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View Full Version : Router Table Fence.. Why?



Scott Hildenbrand
09-03-2009, 12:01 PM
I was just sitting here thinking and wondered to myself, why are router table fences floating, unlike table saw fences? Is there a reason? Or is it simply for convenience or that it's not needed to be fixed?

John Harden
09-03-2009, 12:37 PM
I'm not sure I fully understand what you're asking. Are you wondering why router table fences are not of a T square design like on a table saw where it is always parallel to the edge of the table?

If this is what you're asking, I think it relates to the nature of the spinning bit and in keeping the design simple and inexpensive. You can skew a router table fence at whatever angle you want relative to the edge of the table and it makes no difference to the spinning bit due to its geometry.

Table saw fences need to be parallel (or nearly so) to the blade due to the blade geometry. Skew a table saw fence and you get either a tapered board or kick back if the fence is skewed in the direction of the blade. Not good.

It wouldn't hurt anything to use a rigid T square fence approach on a router table, but why go to the trouble and expense when locking cams or knobs at each end make it plenty rigid?

That's my .02

Regards,

John

Chuck Isaacson
09-03-2009, 12:46 PM
I just ordered my new router fence and it is of the T-fence style. It is a Kreg. It will be here today. I know that they are advertising its usefulness for accuracy of measuring. But what John said makes a lot of sense. Kickback is not of a major concern with the router table like the table saw.

CHuck

Scott Hildenbrand
09-03-2009, 1:04 PM
That's what I was figuring as well. Guess they figure it doesn't need to be, so why bother. Only thing it needs is a strong rest to the right to keep the cut from skewing because of the right hand force.

Ah well.. Just made me wonder why, is all.. ;)

Jason White
09-03-2009, 5:35 PM
My router table is mounted in my tablesaw's extension wing, so I use the tablesaw's fence (a Biesemeyer).

Jason


I was just sitting here thinking and wondered to myself, why are router table fences floating, unlike table saw fences? Is there a reason? Or is it simply for convenience or that it's not needed to be fixed?

Myk Rian
09-03-2009, 6:11 PM
A 2x4 and 2 clamps is all you need for an RT fence. But most people want their fence to look nice. :)

Chris Tsutsui
09-03-2009, 6:19 PM
I dunno what fence we are talking about, but I have the rockler fence, and you can adjust the gap between the two fence halves.

If I wanted to dado a lot at an angle, it will be easy to move the fence at an angle and route away...

Often times I don't even use a fence, and use a bearing on the bit as an edge guide so I can attack the bit from any angle I choose.

Russ Kay
09-03-2009, 7:56 PM
A saw cuts in a straight line; therefore you need the fence to be parallel to the blade.

A router has a spinning bit. As long as you set the fence the proper distance from the edge of the bit, the angle on the table doesn't matter one little bit.