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Anthony Whitesell
10-09-2009, 10:54 AM
Normally when I build something for outdoor use I just cheap out and swing by the lumberyard (not the big box stores) to pick-up some PT lumber. My MIL wants me to rebuild their "trash can shed". The current one has all kinds of really nice (probably pine) quarter round and cove trim on it. It looks really nice, other than it's rotting apart. As I mentioned, I would just grab some PT and have at it, but I have a feeling that sending pieces of a PT 2x through the router table to make coves and roundovers would probably destroy the bits.

What woods are good, sturdy, and cheap for outdoor use? Keep in mind that this will be painted, so grain and the like don't really matter.

What kind of plywood is rated for outdoor use? (ie., what do I ask for at the lumber yard)

Cody Colston
10-09-2009, 11:08 AM
I'd go with Cypress or Western Red Cedar but I don't know how available or affordable they are in your neck-'o-the-woods.

Neal Clayton
10-09-2009, 2:10 PM
cypress, any type of cedar, white oak.

cypress and cedar we get locally down south for 1-3 bucks a foot depending on length and quality. i suspect you could get it up north for around 5 since it's that cheap here? maybe someone else from your area can confirm or deny that.

Bob Lloyd
10-09-2009, 2:56 PM
Cedar would work. Have you considered a man made board like Azek or Koma. You can get pressure treated plywood but I think it is usually CDX.

Anthony Whitesell
10-09-2009, 3:08 PM
Cypress is running 4.20/bf rgh
Red Cedar is 7.05/bf S4S
(from the the only local supplier that carries them)

Spanish Cedar 6.15/bf

White Oak $3.60/bf

If those are the best choices, I think I stick with the oak. It will be painted anyway.

Anthony Whitesell
10-09-2009, 3:09 PM
How made are the man made boards to run through the router table?

Neal Clayton
10-09-2009, 3:11 PM
well they're mixed with PVC, i surely wouldn't want to breathe that dust...

but i haven't cut them personally, seen them used around here a bit for exterior trim.

Walter Plummer
10-09-2009, 3:36 PM
The pvc boards saw and rout well but produce a LOT of static charged sawdust. The edge has more of a texture to it than the pressed faces. Everything we have done with it did not get painted, just left it white and it still looks good. Use stainless nails and screws.

Howard Acheson
10-09-2009, 5:06 PM
>> but I have a feeling that sending pieces of a PT 2x through the router table to make coves and roundovers would probably destroy the bits.

No, pressure treating does not change the character of the wood. The only problem is that the chemicals can cause your cast iron tooling and surfaces to become rusted and stained.

I've routed lots of PT and just used kerosene or mineral spirits to wipe off the bits and the surface of the tools. Never had a problem.

Is this item going to be painted or clear coated? Painting is much preferred for something like this.

Jerry Olexa
10-09-2009, 5:28 PM
I'd go with Cedar IMHO

Rick Moyer
10-09-2009, 6:50 PM
You could probably get Koma (poly) board for about $4.50 -$5.00/bf. I don't know if it comes in other colors but I've made adirondack chairs from it in white.

Dave Dionne
10-09-2009, 9:22 PM
Anthony

Where in New Hampshire are you? I may be able to help you out, how much lumber are you looking for? I have a fair amount of White Cedar on hand it is rough so you would have to mill it.

Let me know if you may be interested in it? Where where you getting your other wood prices?

Dave Dionne

Dave Dionne
10-09-2009, 9:27 PM
Sorry forgot to mention that the Woodcraft store in Newington is having a truckload sale for lumber tommorrow, or so I was told there last week, they had some nice cypress there last week but not sure of the price

Hope this helps Dave

Robert Chapman
10-09-2009, 9:30 PM
Use cedar. It's friendly to work and it will last longer than you will.

jim hedgpeth
10-10-2009, 5:28 AM
Not real experienced in this topic but I would be careful of the dust if you use a router on pressure treated stuff. Older stuff had arsenic in it, the newer stuff has copper and other not good to breath stuff. Personally I only work pressure treated stuff outside, with the wind at my back to blow the dust away from me.

Of the woods you listed, I would go with white oak. Usually cheaper than cypress, and the "picnic" table I have at my lake lot is 15-20 yr old and fine. Grandad and an Uncle I think built it, built heavy too, to deter "kids" from borrowing it for a party a few lots down. The leg ends were soaked in motor oil, but otherwise its got no finish on it, just sanded every year or two to keep splinters down. It has worn a lot better than our P.T. deck.

Jim

Jason White
10-10-2009, 1:09 PM
Try a cellular PVC product like AZEK, KOMO, KLEER, etc. They rout perfectly and don't require paint. Home Depot also has a cheaper version called "tuff board."

Jason


Normally when I build something for outdoor use I just cheap out and swing by the lumberyard (not the big box stores) to pick-up some PT lumber. My MIL wants me to rebuild their "trash can shed". The current one has all kinds of really nice (probably pine) quarter round and cove trim on it. It looks really nice, other than it's rotting apart. As I mentioned, I would just grab some PT and have at it, but I have a feeling that sending pieces of a PT 2x through the router table to make coves and roundovers would probably destroy the bits.

What woods are good, sturdy, and cheap for outdoor use? Keep in mind that this will be painted, so grain and the like don't really matter.

What kind of plywood is rated for outdoor use? (ie., what do I ask for at the lumber yard)

Rob Hermann
10-10-2009, 1:37 PM
I used the AZEK for the console on my boat. I loved it. Easy to work with and has held up great. I used pocket screws and the glue to assemble it. It's solid and so far, 3 years, no problems at all, looks like the day we installed it. (no painting or maintanence either!) I would really recommend you look into this stuff for outdoor apps.

Kent A Bathurst
10-10-2009, 3:35 PM
Don't use PT if you plan to paint it, unless you are willing to (a) wait a year+ before painting, or (b) scrape + paint each year for a couple years. The PT has a lot of moisture in it (water is the carrier for the chemical used in the treating process), and as it dries, the moisture WILL escape, and take the paint with it.

One exception to the above: there is a PT product called KDAT - Kiln Dried After Treating. They take the lumber from the mill - that has been dried to <19% MC and is "KD" - then run it through the PT process, then kiln dry it again - hence KDAT. THis would be fine to paint, except it is very difficult to find, and be careful talking to the folks in the retail stores, because they will say "all our lumber is kiln dried", which is true - they just don't generally know about KDAT because it is carried only be a few specialty locations. PLUS - it is definitley more $$$. But, if I could find it, I would use only KDAT for any + all PT projects, painted or not (because of stability).

BTW - AFAIK, any plywood that is sold as "fire retardant" has to have gone through the KDAT process. While you are not looking for the fire retardant properties, you would still get the KDAT properties. But, again, $$$.