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View Full Version : Work Shop 3000, Wow!



Jerome Hanby
09-14-2011, 9:46 AM
Finally broke out my Work Sharp 3000 and set it up last night. Worked on the blade of a Simmonds block plane I bought off the bay a few years ago. Ran through the four grits that were mounted out of the box to flatten the back, then installed the wide blade fixture and ran the bevel through the same four grits. then conditioned the leather wheel, mounted it, and charged it with buffing compound (actually think I over charged it,it was a little messy) and ran the back and bevel. Wow, was that blade sharp. I took a very wispy shaving off of some poplar. From reading here and elsewhere, I've come to the conclusion that my Simmonds block plane is so-so at best, but it was cutting good last night. Think my record block plane will be amazing once I sharpen it! I noticed that I had packed my dad's crappy Craftsman block plane in my air hammer bag last time I was doing some work up there, think I'll run it through and see how it works before I take it back.

I'm impressed with this thing. I'll be buying some of the Klingspor abrasive packs, a couple of more glass disks, and building a stand with some storage. Thinking I want the Work Sharp to always be setup and ready to go. If I discount the setup time, my initial fumbling around, reading the instructions, and did the back and bevel on each grit before changing to the next, I think I could run the whole blade in less than five minutes!

I'm sure a skilled sharpener and dedicated neanderthal could get a better edge with stones and know-how, but for someone whose use of hand tools supplements his normal power tool usage (is that a hybrid woodworker?), the Work Sharp is easy and convenient enough to use that I'll always have sharper tools.

Noticed that my dad had a wet grinder sitting on the shelf that hadn't seen use in a long time and was thinking of permanently borrowing it, think there is any place for that if the Work Sharp is going to be the go to tool for sharpening? I already have dual speed grinders, a Wolverine, and vari-grind for my wife's lathe chisels.

Prashun Patel
09-14-2011, 10:37 AM
I agree with you Jerome. Look into the DMT Worksharp discs. THey last a lot longer and they have magnetic backings, so you don't have to unscrew the wheels to change. I can't find any reviews of those though. How about YOU try it out and tell me what you think? ;)

glenn bradley
09-14-2011, 10:49 AM
This is just the type of response that hand sharpening fans hate to hear ;). Used properly as you describe, I get a completely finished edge off the Worksharp for 99% of my work. Although I've made jigs for curved surfaces, they get the hand treatment before being called done. Chisels and plane irons do well right off the machine for the most part. Congrats.

Jerome Hanby
09-14-2011, 11:30 AM
I saw those on the Woodcraft site before I left work last night and it took a supreme effort of will not to swing by and nab them on the way home. Kept telling my self, try what you already have first. Glad you haven't tried them, a good review might have been more than my will power could stand. The magnetic deal explains the picture on Woodcraft. maybe I didn't read thoroughly, but I didn't get that from the description and was wondering about the metallic looking disk.

Just looked back, I didn't read thoroughly and I guess the Magna in the name was a big clue! Says you get two disks, 325 and 600 grit. The slightly cheaper honing kit has one 1200 grit disk. How do those grits compare to the sandpaper disks? I went through four grits last night, do the two diamond grits do the same job?


I agree with you Jerome. Look into the DMT Worksharp discs. THey last a lot longer and they have magnetic backings, so you don't have to unscrew the wheels to change. I can't find any reviews of those though. How about YOU try it out and tell me what you think? ;)

Peter Aeschliman
09-14-2011, 2:20 PM
The more I look into sharpening equipment, the more I think the Worksharp is a fantastic value. One Shapton water stone costs more than the Worksharp! Obviously the worksharp has a higher on-going cost since you have to replace the discs over time, but even then it would take a lot of sharpening before you'd get anywhere close to the cost of high end water stones.

Dave Gaul
09-14-2011, 3:52 PM
I've posted this on WS threads before, but you gotta try these: http://www.woodworkingshop.com/cgi-bin/020F233E/mac/additmdtl.mac/showItemDetail?item=SD06199&qtyA=0&phsO=N&desc=6%22X1%2F2%22%20CENTER%20HOLE%20STEARATE%20PS A%2025PK&drpshp=N&alOrd=Y&iQty=.000&oQty=.000&initQty=1&assortParent=K&itemForSale=Y&styleName=&fixD=&face=.00&gftc=&stck=Y&prefS=&calledFrom=DS&ordInfo1=&ordInfo2=&ordInfo3=&ordMan1=N&ordMan2=N&ordMan3=N&persCode=&persReqd=&persLink=%20&shipRemaining=0&daysBetween=0&daysBetweenFix=0&monthsBetween=0

Just started using them myself and they are so much better than the WS brand papers.

John Coloccia
09-14-2011, 4:18 PM
Why is the Worksharp so effective?

Hand tool users should take note...I'm a big hand tool user and I DID take note.

The key is repeatable bevel angle...always. The hardest thing to do with stones (which I have and love), and grinding jigs like the Tormek (which I also have and love) is REPEATABILITY. Sharpening is a chore because if you're off a bit on your angle....even just a smidge...you are regrinding an enormous amount of metal that you DON'T NEED TO TOUCH. The Worksharp cracked the code, so to speak. The angle is easily repeatable, so every step, from rough grinding to final grinding, is precise and consistent. Precise = speed. Speed = not a chore anymore.

The leather hone, IMHO, is a failing. It should go upside down and be repeatable as well. It's too easy to round over and edge. The felt buff is the same. With technique, they both work amazingly well, but it takes a bit of touch. No biggie. I can sharpen and hone by hand but I'm practiced from years of hand sharpening. There's really no reason, though, why this should require practice. It's 2011. Sharpening should be a no-brainer. We have much better things to do with our time.

Anyhow, the same level of repeatability can be had with standard jigs and stones if you take the time to make some "projection jigs". I could give instructions here, but just check out some of the Lie Nielson videos on sharpening and you'll see how to make some simple jigs.

Freehand sharpening works fantastically well also, IF you have a very steady and practiced hand OR you have a hollow grind from your grinder.

Bottom line is that I really like my WorkSharp. I've had it for a while and for anything that fits into the port, it is an absolute time saver, especially if you're not a sharpening guru. Personally, I wish they would make a few, simple modifications so that I could simply and easily use it to hone EVERYTHING I own. Honestly, I would sell off all of my stones if they did.

They could even incorporate a honing jig on top of the Worksharp, and incorporate a simple projection jig there too (a'la Drill Doctor that's been doing this for MANY years) and turn it into the ultimate sharpening station for all of our chisels and planes. I don't really know why the haven't done this yet.

The Worksharp is really one of a handful of tools that I really love and recommend to lots and lots of people. It's just a no-BS tool that will get your chisels and block planes sharp with very little effort and fuss.

Jerome Hanby
09-14-2011, 4:31 PM
I've got a couple of packs of those on my short list.

[QUOTE=Dave Gaul;1775192]I've posted this on WS threads before, but you gotta try these:

Jerome Hanby
09-14-2011, 4:39 PM
Repeatability is definitely a major point, but so is speed. I know myself well enough that if it takes more than a few minutes to sharpen up a blade, then those sharpening sessions are going to be few and far between. I'm just not interested enough in the process to devote that kind of time, even if it is one big investment in time for the initial sharpening and much less to keep it touched up.

Maybe I wasn't supposed to, but I used the wide blade sharpening jig to do the bevel on the leather wheel, then did the back free hand. I have zero confidence in my ability at holding that angle without mechanical assistance, I found that out trying to touch up the edge on my wife's Thompson bowl gouge. Yea, Wolverine and Vari-grind! (preliminary yea, I don't have them mounted yet, but I have high hopes)


Why is the Worksharp so effective?

Hand tool users should take note...I'm a big hand tool user and I DID take note.

The key is repeatable bevel angle...always. The hardest thing to do with stones (which I have and love), and grinding jigs like the Tormek (which I also have and love) is REPEATABILITY. Sharpening is a chore because if you're off a bit on your angle....even just a smidge...you are regrinding an enormous amount of metal that you DON'T NEED TO TOUCH. The Worksharp cracked the code, so to speak. The angle is easily repeatable, so every step, from rough grinding to final grinding, is precise and consistent. Precise = speed. Speed = not a chore anymore.

The leather hone, IMHO, is a failing. It should go upside down and be repeatable as well. It's too easy to round over and edge. The felt buff is the same. With technique, they both work amazingly well, but it takes a bit of touch. No biggie. I can sharpen and hone by hand but I'm practiced from years of hand sharpening. There's really no reason, though, why this should require practice. It's 2011. Sharpening should be a no-brainer. We have much better things to do with our time.

Anyhow, the same level of repeatability can be had with standard jigs and stones if you take the time to make some "projection jigs". I could give instructions here, but just check out some of the Lie Nielson videos on sharpening and you'll see how to make some simple jigs.

Freehand sharpening works fantastically well also, IF you have a very steady and practiced hand OR you have a hollow grind from your grinder.

Bottom line is that I really like my WorkSharp. I've had it for a while and for anything that fits into the port, it is an absolute time saver, especially if you're not a sharpening guru. Personally, I wish they would make a few, simple modifications so that I could simply and easily use it to hone EVERYTHING I own. Honestly, I would sell off all of my stones if they did.

They could even incorporate a honing jig on top of the Worksharp, and incorporate a simple projection jig there too (a'la Drill Doctor that's been doing this for MANY years) and turn it into the ultimate sharpening station for all of our chisels and planes. I don't really know why the haven't done this yet.

The Worksharp is really one of a handful of tools that I really love and recommend to lots and lots of people. It's just a no-BS tool that will get your chisels and block planes sharp with very little effort and fuss.

John Coloccia
09-14-2011, 4:53 PM
Repeatability IS speed. I think you did just right using a jig to hone on the leather wheel. The only problem I have honing the back freehand is that it's very easy to introduce a back bevel. This is no big deal on plane irons (until you run into clearance issues....but if you're close, you're good). On chisels, a back bevel will absolutely kill you and make the chisel all but useless for precision work. I'm very cautious honing the back of my chisels on the Worksharp. There's some serious potential for problems there...you need to be awake.

This is also why I removed the sandpaper from the sharpening port. That will slowly introduce a back bevel on your chisels unless you're very vigilant. I hone the back of my chisels on a Spyderco UltraFine stone (a stone highly recommended to me by George Wilson, and frankly it's the only stone Spyderco makes that actually comes reasonably flat. He's 100% on the money, as usual).

Anyhow, I think you're echoing my sentiments. Clearly I didn't explain myself well. I agree with you 100%. It's all about SPEED.

Prashun Patel
09-14-2011, 4:53 PM
Yea, Wolverine and Vari-grind! (preliminary yea, I don't have them mounted yet, but I have high hopes)

Um, if you think the WS is good at flat tools, just wait until you get yr turning tips on the Vari-grind. Now THAT's what I call easy.

Jerome Hanby
09-14-2011, 5:05 PM
I was embellishing not disagreeing, if it's not repeatable (or requires some dexterity on my part) then it's not going to happen. Thanks for the heads up on the chisels. That stone is about $72 bucks at WC, but that may be going on my short list...


Repeatability IS speed. I think you did just right using a jig to hone on the leather wheel. The only problem I have honing the back freehand is that it's very easy to introduce a back bevel. This is no big deal on plane irons (until you run into clearance issues....but if you're close, you're good). On chisels, a back bevel will absolutely kill you and make the chisel all but useless for precision work. I'm very cautious honing the back of my chisels on the Worksharp. There's some serious potential for problems there...you need to be awake.

This is also why I removed the sandpaper from the sharpening port. That will slowly introduce a back bevel on your chisels unless you're very vigilant. I hone the back of my chisels on a Spyderco UltraFine stone (a stone highly recommended to me by George Wilson, and frankly it's the only stone Spyderco makes that actually comes reasonably flat. He's 100% on the money, as usual).

Anyhow, I think you're echoing my sentiments. Clearly I didn't explain myself well. I agree with you 100%. It's all about SPEED.

Jerome Hanby
09-14-2011, 5:07 PM
Thank god. It's bad enough when I mess up my tools, no way I want to mess up her turning chisels...especially after I took two years to get her lathe stand built.


Um, if you think the WS is good at flat tools, just wait until you get yr turning tips on the Vari-grind. Now THAT's what I call easy.

Stan Mitchell
09-14-2011, 7:53 PM
The WS3000 has made chisel and plane work so . . . ooo much more enjoyable for me.

I used to put off sharpening my chisels until they just wouldn't cut at all - that's how much I hated sharpening them.

Now I get kind of giddy when cleaning up a mortise because my chisels are so stinking sharp all the time. A total pleasure.

Randy Dutkiewicz
09-14-2011, 8:29 PM
I've posted this on WS threads before, but you gotta try these: http://www.woodworkingshop.com/cgi-bin/020F233E/mac/additmdtl.mac/showItemDetail?item=SD06199&qtyA=0&phsO=N&desc=6"X1%2F2" CENTER HOLE STEARATE PSA 25PK&drpshp=N&alOrd=Y&iQty=.000&oQty=.000&initQty=1&assortParent=K&itemForSale=Y&styleName=&fixD=&face=.00&gftc=&stck=Y&prefS=&calledFrom=DS&ordInfo1=&ordInfo2=&ordInfo3=&ordMan1=N&ordMan2=N&ordMan3=N&persCode=&persReqd=&persLink= &shipRemaining=0&daysBetween=0&daysBetweenFix=0&monthsBetween=0 (http://www.woodworkingshop.com/cgi-bin/020F233E/mac/additmdtl.mac/showItemDetail?item=SD06199&qtyA=0&phsO=N&desc=6)


Just started using them myself and they are so much better than the WS brand papers.
Thanks Dave. This is now on my short list also!!! I LOVE a great deal:)

David Larsen
09-14-2011, 8:44 PM
Follow up the sharpening and leather hone with the felt polishing wheel. Makes 'em look pretty and sharp!

Jerome Hanby
09-15-2011, 10:03 AM
I may pick up that felt wheel next time I'm in WC. Also think I'm going to pick up enough glass wheels so I can have each grit on it's own wheel top and bottom. That way when I start doing my chisels I can do the backs on top and the bevels through the port without flipping the wheel. Is doing both the backs and bevels at a particular grit at the same time a viable plan or should I completely get the backs flat before touching the bevels? I know I did the back first on the block plane blade I sharpened and just hit the back quickly after the bevel on each grit to do away with any wire edge (think that's the correct term).

Thanks everyone for al the great information. If I keep sharpening I'm not going to have any hair left on my arms at all :D.

One more thing, I'm going to sharpen up a clunky block plane I brought home form my folks place before I return it. Haven't examined the plane yet, but I anticipate the sole needing some work. I've got a granite block, is my best bet using automotive w/d sand paper on that block and flattening the sole through progressive grits? I'm assuming I work it over good with the coarsest grit until it's flat and has an even scratch pattern then work my way up... Or do I fire up the belt sander, use a coarse belt, and work it as close to flat with that before I move to the granite and sandpaper? That would give me an excuse to try out the Shopsmith Belt Sander I bought and have never fired up...

Prashun Patel
09-15-2011, 10:07 AM
If the block is small enough, you can flatten it on the Worksharp - at least roughly. I've used 80 grit on several block and shoulder plane soles.

Jerome Hanby
09-15-2011, 10:12 AM
It not a miniature plane, about block plane sized :rolleyes:. Plus it an old crapsman model so what could I hurt!


If the block is small enough, you can flatten it on the Worksharp - at least roughly. I've used 80 grit on several block and shoulder plane soles.

Dave Gaul
09-15-2011, 9:24 PM
I've got a couple of packs of those on my short list.

[QUOTE=Randy Dutkiewicz;1775340]Thanks Dave. This is now on my short list also!!! I LOVE a great deal:)

You're welcome!
I found them from another creeker at some point. I had them on my list for a long time, got sick of the WS papers and place the order. Had them in my shop for quite a while before I finally tried them. Should have tried them MUCH sooner!

Harold Burrell
09-15-2011, 11:01 PM
OK...now I want one...

Where's the best place to get one and are they ever on sale???

Jerome Hanby
09-15-2011, 11:53 PM
I bought mine during some Woodcraft sales event. Not sure it was much reduced in price, but it had some extras (The leather honing wheel and an extra glass disk if IIRC). Think a lot of 'creekers got good deals at sears when they were clearing them out... I've seen other sales, but nothing that seems to be a pattern. Seems to be a love or hate kind of item, bet some 'creeker might be willing to sell you theirs...


OK...now I want one...

Where's the best place to get one and are they ever on sale???

Harold Burrell
09-16-2011, 9:02 AM
...bet some 'creeker might be willing to sell you theirs...


oooh...now there's a thought...

Jeff Monson
09-16-2011, 10:27 AM
I'd never part with my worksharp. I dropped mine a few months ago, it broke the under wheel sharpening assembly : (
I called worksharp, sent it in and for $15 they went through it and replaced the broken parts! Customer service was outstanding. I use mine for plane irons and chisels and it does a very nice job at that. Just wish they would come out with a "card scraper system" I really stink at getting a good edge on a card scraper.

Stan Krupowies
09-16-2011, 10:36 AM
OK...now I want one...

Where's the best place to get one and are they ever on sale???

Coastal Tools in West Hartford, CT has it on sale now for $179 and I think they charge $8.50 for shipping.

Bill White
09-16-2011, 2:57 PM
DANG!!!
You guys almost make me wany to pitch the old and trusty Makita. Notice I said ALMOST.
Bill

Peter Aeschliman
09-16-2011, 3:40 PM
Okay... this thread along with Mr. Coloccia's video review a while back have convinced me to buy a Worksharp this weekend. I'm too impatient to learn the art of sharpening and it's really not something I have any interest in being an expert in. All I want is for my tools to be sharp!!

Jerome Hanby
09-16-2011, 3:41 PM
I picked up a 4 legged sheet metal grinder stand from HF a while back. Seems pretty sturdy, I'm going to mount some plywood on the top and setup a dual speed grinder and the Wolverine stuff for my wife's turning tools. Think I'm going to pick up another one and build a fairly tall drawer into it with slots for the glass disks and storage for the accessories and supplies for the WS3000. Saw a cool setup another 'creeker built and posted, but his solution basically filled the role that my wide blade attachment serves and I've already got that. Think this stand has a small enough foot print that it won't be in my way and the drawer will serve to keep all my WS stuff organized and in one place. Here is a picture of the stand I bought. For $25, it's plenty good enough for this task...

207789

John Coloccia
09-16-2011, 3:44 PM
Okay... this thread along with Mr. Coloccia's video review a while back have convinced me to buy a Worksharp this weekend. I'm too impatient to learn the art of sharpening and it's really not something I have any interest in being an expert in. All I want is for my tools to be sharp!!

They should start sending me royalties.

Jim Laumann
09-17-2011, 10:10 AM
John

Could you point me in the right direction to your review....the royalty check will be in the mail.....soon....I promise.....really....;)

Thks

Jim

John Coloccia
09-17-2011, 7:40 PM
John

Could you point me in the right direction to your review....the royalty check will be in the mail.....soon....I promise.....really....;)

Thks

Jim

Sure. For whatever reason, it's ended up under Lathes and Accessories.

http://www.sawmillcreek.org/content.php?131-Review-Worksharp-3000-Henry-Taylor-Paring-Chisels

Jim Neeley
09-18-2011, 5:31 AM
I had a number of old tools to "initiate" (lots of sanding with coarse paper) so I tried picking up a box of 6" plain PSA disks. It was about $25 for 100 (a lifetime supply). I stuck them to the glass plate and used a boxcutter to cut the hole, using the glass as a reference. It worked like a champ!

My next stop will be an automotive paint supplier for some fine disks.

I have my shaptons for the wide blades but for the chisels, you gotta be mighty good to beat the WS3000!! It makes it so quick that you can easily sharpen between uses and not "put it off" until it's like a butter knife. <g>

Don Wurscher
09-18-2011, 12:30 PM
For you WorkSharp fans like me, check out page 6 of the latest Woodsmith
for a simple jig for sharping plane irons

Jerome Hanby
09-19-2011, 9:50 AM
I saw that and it reminded me of a dumbed down version of a jig/housing someone posted on SMC. I couldn't see that it added anything that the wide blade attachment from Work Sharp didn't provide. The unit the 'creeker posted provided the same added functionality of the wide blade attachment plus storage!


For you WorkSharp fans like me, check out page 6 of the latest Woodsmith
for a simple jig for sharping plane irons

John Coloccia
09-19-2011, 10:03 AM
I saw that and it reminded me of a dumbed down version of a jig/housing someone posted on SMC. I couldn't see that it added anything that the wide blade attachment from Work Sharp didn't provide. The unit the 'creeker posted provided the same added functionality of the wide blade attachment plus storage!

The WS's wide blade attachment has taken some flak for not being level. They may have fixed this by now, but some made a separate platform to get around that.

Jerome Hanby
09-19-2011, 10:21 AM
I bought mine right after it was introduced (it was the newest add-on to the Work Sharp at the time). I had to use a straight edge to get mine level on both sides as I tightened down the screws, but I figured that was SOP, never thought twice about it other than duh, I should have realized that when I was attaching it the first time. Now that I think about it, there was nothing in the installation instructions telling me to do that. Wonder if that's what the caused the original flak?


The WS's wide blade attachment has taken some flak for not being level. They may have fixed this by now, but some made a separate platform to get around that.

Jim Rimmer
09-19-2011, 3:06 PM
I picked one up Saturday at WoodCraft. They had them for $199 and gave me a pre-sale discount for a sale that is coming up so I got 10% off - enough to cover the sales tax and toll road fees. Can't wait to try it out.

John Coloccia
09-19-2011, 4:06 PM
I bought mine right after it was introduced (it was the newest add-on to the Work Sharp at the time). I had to use a straight edge to get mine level on both sides as I tightened down the screws, but I figured that was SOP, never thought twice about it other than duh, I should have realized that when I was attaching it the first time. Now that I think about it, there was nothing in the installation instructions telling me to do that. Wonder if that's what the caused the original flak?

I believe the exact complaint was that it was either impossible or extremely difficult to level it for some reason.

Erik France
09-19-2011, 4:39 PM
I believe the exact complaint was that it was either impossible or extremely difficult to level it for some reason.I found it to be a big pain to level and get aligned. I should have made a bigger wide blade table than purchased the WS kit. I prefer my MK-II jig over the WS guide too.

I wanted to use the top bar on mine recently, but I decided to sharpen the tool by other means since I was very reluctant to remove the wide blade table. I wasn't really looking forward to putting it back on.

Peter Aeschliman
09-19-2011, 6:37 PM
I picked mine up this weekend too... man, it sure beats sharpening by hand. I will definitely make one of those wide blade tables- thanks for the tip on that guys.

Question for you guys though- I bought the leather and felt wheels for the machine. The felt wheel comes with a longer "arbor bolt" if you will (you know, the thing you screw in to fasten down the sanding disks). The instructions say to use the the felt wheel on top of the transparent slotted wheel... but even though the "arbor bolt" they provided with the felt wheel is longer than the one that came with the machine, it's not long enough to go all the way through the felt wheel and the slotted wheel. It doesn't engage the threads. I stared at for a few minutes and couldn't come up with any logical way to make it work.

Am I an idiot, or has anybody else run into this problem?

John Coloccia
09-19-2011, 6:43 PM
I always use the buff on the leather wheel. Maybe I ran into the same problem and improvised. I don't really remember anymore. Regardless, it's more convenient than keeping the slotted wheel around (which I have absolutely no use for anyway).

Peter Aeschliman
09-19-2011, 6:52 PM
Alright, sorry to clutter this thread. I got the novel idea to call tech support. They were super helpful. He went into their sample room and immediately saw the issue. The instructions with the felt wheel are incorrect- you're supposed to put the felt wheel on top of a glass wheel.

Not sure why I didn't think of that... lol

David Larsen
09-19-2011, 7:24 PM
The end of last year the BORG with the orange roof had WS3000 online. WS3000, Shipping and tax came to $75. First they honored the first few out, then back ordered, then canceled. There was a customer service stink in the air. The BORG with the orange roof worked with Worksharp to secure enough units to honor the original orders. Mine came a month or so later. I am extremely pleased with the WS and the orange roof BORG customer service after they came through for us on that one. That was a great deal!

I picked up some extra leather hone wheels on clearance awhile back. They were cheap. I have more than enough of the leather hones now, so a took the leather off one of them, tossed it, and use the glass wheel to mount additional grits to it as the glass wheel is the same.

Dave Gaul
09-20-2011, 10:10 AM
I picked mine up this weekend too... man, it sure beats sharpening by hand. I will definitely make one of those wide blade tables- thanks for the tip on that guys.

Question for you guys though- I bought the leather and felt wheels for the machine. The felt wheel comes with a longer "arbor bolt" if you will (you know, the thing you screw in to fasten down the sanding disks). The instructions say to use the the felt wheel on top of the transparent slotted wheel... but even though the "arbor bolt" they provided with the felt wheel is longer than the one that came with the machine, it's not long enough to go all the way through the felt wheel and the slotted wheel. It doesn't engage the threads. I stared at for a few minutes and couldn't come up with any logical way to make it work.

Am I an idiot, or has anybody else run into this problem?

You are not an idiot, unless I am too! I emailed WS about this very problem, and turns out the directions were mis-printed. I use the buffing wheel under a spare glass wheel I bought, and the longer bolt fits perfectly.

Peter Aeschliman
09-20-2011, 1:19 PM
Thanks man. Yeah, I called them and they told me the same thing.

I think I'm going to just slap it on top of one of the glass wheels that have sand paper attached to them (instead of buying a new glass wheel).

Jim Rimmer
09-20-2011, 2:34 PM
HOLY SMOKE!!!! I fired mine up last night and cleaned up a chisel I got from my Dad's tools when he passed. What a great way to sharpen. Then I tackled a block plane that I have used (actually, struggled with) and sharpened it. Planing is great when your plane is sharp. :D Thank you, Jerome for your original post and John C. for your videos.

Jerome Hanby
09-20-2011, 2:45 PM
This is kind of funny. I started this post to basically say I sure was dumb to leave this thing on the shelf so long before trying it. Glad it helped out some other folks. It's got me fired up enough to drag out all those junky planes I've picked up over the years and start rehabing them. First victim is a very old Stanley 60 1/2. It looks like it's still solid, but does have rust problems. Going to soak it a day or so in Evaporust and work the parts over good with a wire brush and see what I end up with. I think I actually have a hock blade that will fit this thing. I also bought some Asphaltum quite a while back, I may take a shot at re-japanning this plane. Wonder how hard my wife will hit me when I try to bake it in her oven?

Jim Laumann
09-20-2011, 4:11 PM
I saw that and it reminded me of a dumbed down version of a jig/housing someone posted on SMC. I couldn't see that it added anything that the wide blade attachment from Work Sharp didn't provide. The unit the 'creeker posted provided the same added functionality of the wide blade attachment plus storage!

Don, Jerome

Could you provide the issue number please? I looked at the lateset Woodsmith at the local bookstore - didn't see it - or if'n I did, it didn't sink in....

Thks

Jim

Jerome Hanby
09-20-2011, 4:27 PM
I don't have it in front of me (I'm still at work) but it came in the mail within the last few days. Pretty sure the cover is something about cutting small parts. They've changed their website so it no longer shows you each issue along with its table of contents. Major mistake in my book. So, I can't tell the volume and issue number. I'll try and think to look and post when i get home tonight,


Don, Jerome

Could you provide the issue number please? I looked at the lateset Woodsmith at the local bookstore - didn't see it - or if'n I did, it didn't sink in....

Thks

Jim

Erik France
09-20-2011, 4:40 PM
Going to soak it a day or so in Evaporust and work the parts over good with a wire brush and see what I end up with.Watch out when leaving stuff in the Evaporust too long, the metal will discolor to a soft grey. I left a brace and an old Seargent plane in the stuff overnight. I didn't like the results.

Jerome Hanby
09-20-2011, 4:43 PM
Thanks for the advise. Maybe I'll bring it in the house with me so I can check it periodically.

Jerome Hanby
09-20-2011, 11:44 PM
Latest issue Vol 33, No, 197, page 6.

But Glen's post here (http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?172256-Any-experience-here-with-either-WorkSharp-sharpening-tool&highlight=Worksharp) is a better implementation!


Don, Jerome

Could you provide the issue number please? I looked at the lateset Woodsmith at the local bookstore - didn't see it - or if'n I did, it didn't sink in....

Thks

Jim

Jim Laumann
09-21-2011, 10:16 AM
Latest issue Vol 33, No, 197, page 6.

But Glen's post here (http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?172256-Any-experience-here-with-either-WorkSharp-sharpening-tool&highlight=Worksharp) is a better implementation!

Jerome

197 explains it, the local bookstore still has #196 on the shelf.....

Thks

Jim

Jacob Nothstine
09-21-2011, 12:02 PM
Can you sharpen a Corner chisels on the WS3000.

Dave Gaul
09-21-2011, 12:38 PM
Can you sharpen a Corner chisels on the WS3000.

I don't see why not. With some trial & error I think it could be done.

Erik France
09-21-2011, 1:08 PM
Corner chisels would be pretty tough. I didn't even consider putting mine on there. There would be too much of a chance for me to damage the other side of the chisel. It would have to be sharpened on top. The WS only spins one direction, doing both bevels on the corner chisel would be problematic.

Dave Gaul
09-21-2011, 1:23 PM
Corner chisels would be pretty tough. I didn't even consider putting mine on there. There would be too much of a chance for me to damage the other side of the chisel. It would have to be sharpened on top. The WS only spins one direction, doing both bevels on the corner chisel would be problematic.

Oh yeah... I didn't think about doing both sides of the corner chisel. I was picturing being able to do one side on the edge of the wheel, on top as you said. And the wheel would have to be elevated to have room to hold the chisel on the edge of the wheel. Didn't think about the other side of the chisel though!!

Jerome Hanby
09-21-2011, 1:29 PM
Should work well to flatten both outsides, but that's the easy part anyway.

Guess that raises the question, how the heck do you sharpen the bevel on a corner chisel anyway?


Oh yeah... I didn't think about doing both sides of the corner chisel. I was picturing being able to do one side on the edge of the wheel, on top as you said. And the wheel would have to be elevated to have room to hold the chisel on the edge of the wheel. Didn't think about the other side of the chisel though!!

Dave Gaul
09-21-2011, 1:37 PM
Should work well to flatten both outsides, but that's the easy part anyway.

Guess that raises the question, how the heck do you sharpen the bevel on a corner chisel anyway?

Have yet to try it myself, don't use one too often. Guessing with files, or maybe a version of the scary sharp method?

Erik France
09-21-2011, 1:54 PM
I have't tried sharpening mine yet either, it's a little over due now. I was going to try some paper on glass. I've also got an auger bit file, but I don't think it'll get it sharp enough.

Ben Cadotte
09-27-2011, 8:45 PM
I have had my WS 3000 for a couple years now. And I do not regret it one bit. When I first bought it, I caught a bunch of accessories on Amazon for a big discount. I bought extra glass plates so each grade of paper has its own side. No changing of paper at all. I use an abrasive cleaner on the paper and the WS brand has lasted a long time. Though I did also buy spare paper. Have yet to use it though.

I made a simple wooden jig to hold my 6" jointer knives. I did my jointer knives on the WS and you could not believe how well they cut. I took a piece of 2x pine and cut a slot in the edge. I then beveled the end of the 2x to the jointers blade angle. When I cut the bevel I did it so the blade was just slightly longer than the depth of the slot. I use the guide bar on the WS and move the blade back and forth across the wheel. Since the jig is wood. The paper sands it just like the blade. Works like a charm. I have used it 3 times now (3 blades each time). I thought of a couple ways to make a better guide system for doing wide blades like this. But each time I have used my ol' Piney, it has worked just fine. I have not done it yet but was thinking of trying a 12" planer blade the same way.

Dave Zellers
09-28-2011, 12:02 AM
I've had the WS 3000 in my peripheral vision for a while now and this thread forced my hand given that we are just finishing up a white ash kitchen and are a week or so away from installing in an out of level, out of plumb, post and beam 2nd floor kitchen that has to rise up and meet the out of everything roof.

Gonna need some seriously (scary?) sharp chisels and planes.

So I pulled the trigger and it arrived yesterday. After two evenings, I already feel like I've had this tool for months if not forever. It's very user friendly. After years of freehand grinding, my angles were way off and of course, off on the too shallow side as that is the quickest way to a new edge. So I Have worn out the two 120 grit discs that come with the WS but more will arrive tomorrow.

It can take a lot to regrind to a new (correct) angle, but after that, a few quick touches to the next higher grit has you on your way to the next higher one after that.

I've got 100 disks each of Mirka 6" psa 120, 220, and 320 arriving tomorrow. Plus the 400, 1000 and 3600 discs I already have.

Too many? Don't think so- I've got 40 years of dull and inaccurately ground chisels and plane irons to be brought up to specs. Looking forward to it.

This tool is everything good that everyone has said. Did I determine that in the two days I've had this thing?

No. 40 years and two days.

Dave Gaul
09-29-2011, 11:04 AM
I have had my WS 3000 for a couple years now. And I do not regret it one bit. When I first bought it, I caught a bunch of accessories on Amazon for a big discount. I bought extra glass plates so each grade of paper has its own side. No changing of paper at all. I use an abrasive cleaner on the paper and the WS brand has lasted a long time. Though I did also buy spare paper. Have yet to use it though.

I made a simple wooden jig to hold my 6" jointer knives. I did my jointer knives on the WS and you could not believe how well they cut. I took a piece of 2x pine and cut a slot in the edge. I then beveled the end of the 2x to the jointers blade angle. When I cut the bevel I did it so the blade was just slightly longer than the depth of the slot. I use the guide bar on the WS and move the blade back and forth across the wheel. Since the jig is wood. The paper sands it just like the blade. Works like a charm. I have used it 3 times now (3 blades each time). I thought of a couple ways to make a better guide system for doing wide blades like this. But each time I have used my ol' Piney, it has worked just fine. I have not done it yet but was thinking of trying a 12" planer blade the same way.

That is a great idea... I just might have to try that!

Harold Burrell
09-29-2011, 12:43 PM
I have had my WS 3000 for a couple years now. And I do not regret it one bit. When I first bought it, I caught a bunch of accessories on Amazon for a big discount. I bought extra glass plates so each grade of paper has its own side. No changing of paper at all. I use an abrasive cleaner on the paper and the WS brand has lasted a long time. Though I did also buy spare paper. Have yet to use it though.

I made a simple wooden jig to hold my 6" jointer knives. I did my jointer knives on the WS and you could not believe how well they cut. I took a piece of 2x pine and cut a slot in the edge. I then beveled the end of the 2x to the jointers blade angle. When I cut the bevel I did it so the blade was just slightly longer than the depth of the slot. I use the guide bar on the WS and move the blade back and forth across the wheel. Since the jig is wood. The paper sands it just like the blade. Works like a charm. I have used it 3 times now (3 blades each time). I thought of a couple ways to make a better guide system for doing wide blades like this. But each time I have used my ol' Piney, it has worked just fine. I have not done it yet but was thinking of trying a 12" planer blade the same way.

Would you be so kind as to taking some pictures of your jig?