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View Full Version : Cake Pans - inexpensive hand engraver?



Laura Zaruba
04-27-2012, 1:49 PM
Hello all!


I had pretty good success several years ago so I'm thinking about doing cake pans again for a fundraiser and craft show this summer. Previously some people would request personalization on the side or bottom of the pan but I only have a laser. Wondering if any of you have tried using an inexpensive hand-engraver tool to engrave on aluminum? Thoughts? Ideas?

I REALLY wish DoughMaker pans were still an option =( but looks like NordicWare is the only option out there that I know of. Has anyone found another supplier?

Thanks!

Laura

Dee Gallo
04-27-2012, 3:06 PM
I use Mirro pans...they are cheapo but once you put some paint and engraving on them, they look like a million bucks (it's all about the lid anyway). I use Cermark to mark the name on the bottom for ID (please return to _____) but I've also done the inside of the lid for an inscription too. I use automotive paint since it is very hard and permanent and comes in lots of colors. I recently did some using hammered copper (Krylon) and it came out very well. I use primer underneath for extra colors or just plain paint for silver to show through. When I get some playtime, I'm going to do more with masking the spray paint for different looks. There's a lot of potential in this technique.

Laura Zaruba
04-27-2012, 3:17 PM
Very nice Dee!! Thanks for sharing. I'll have to look into that. I never had great luck with Cermark in the past but maybe I should give it another try.

Martin Boekers
04-27-2012, 3:43 PM
Dee, do you have any concerns about these paints being food safe? Not being much of a cook
I'm not sure what to say if someone asks. :)

Joe Hillmann
04-27-2012, 4:00 PM
How many pans are you looking for? On ocassion I have sold pans to other companies.

Michael Hunter
04-27-2012, 4:13 PM
I don't understand why the paint doesn't bubble up or burn off in the oven.

If the paint is just on the outside, then it should not give any food-safe concerns (unless people start licking spillages off the outside!).

Laura Zaruba
04-27-2012, 4:14 PM
Hi Joe.

I'm not real sure right now; the minimum order for NordicWare is 24 pans (4 each of 6 colors) so I figured I'd need at least that many to start and get some samples made up. If you could PM me more info I'd definitely be interested.

Thanks!


How many pans are you looking for? On ocassion I have sold pans to other companies.

Martin Boekers
04-27-2012, 4:25 PM
I don't understand why the paint doesn't bubble up or burn off in the oven.

If the paint is just on the outside, then it should not give any food-safe concerns (unless people start licking spillages off the outside!).

Again, not being a cook, I don't know of a posiblitity of a pan getting heated and giving off a gas. :)

Laura Zaruba
04-27-2012, 4:29 PM
I don't understand why the paint doesn't bubble up or burn off in the oven.

If the paint is just on the outside, then it should not give any food-safe concerns (unless people start licking spillages off the outside!).

I don't know how often people actually keep the lid on when baking?? I know I never have, not to say some people do...? I think the DM & NW lids are oven/food safe so I suppose this is a good question. If I painted lids I'd probably include a disclaimer that they are not meant to be used in the oven, only the pan. (?)

Dee Gallo
04-27-2012, 4:29 PM
You do not put the lids in the oven, they are for carrying and storage. I imagine you could use high heat paint, such as the kind used for auto engines and tractors... but I usually just do the outside of the lids and tell people not to put them in the oven. They are dishwasher proof, though. Cars spend a lot of time in the hot sun and they don't seem to mind... but it does not say anything on the can about temperatures, other than the can of paint itself.

Dee Gallo
04-27-2012, 4:43 PM
I just googled high heat paints and found:
Rust-Oleum 4200/4300 System High Heat Coating Green (<650 g/l VOC High Temp)

Prevents moisture from reaching the primer. Excellent resistance to general weathering, salt air, mild chemicals, fumes and light abrasion. No heat cure required. Modified silicone coating protects surfaces subject to temperatures 300-800 F (149-427 C).

Now, I wonder if the laser can burn it!

Anthony Welch
04-27-2012, 10:28 PM
Very nice Dee.

Dee Gallo
04-27-2012, 10:49 PM
TCP Global has the best I've found so far, lots of colors:

VHT 550F (288C) Engine Enamels™ are available in a wide range of colors, including exact match factory colors. All colors have excellent durability and superior heat and chemical resistance. They are specially formulated to withstand corrosion, rust, salt spray, chemicals and additives of today’s gasoline blends and degreasers. VHT 550F (288C) Engine Enamels™ are a unique blend of urethane and ceramic resins, which produce a tough and long-lasting finish for engines, engine accessories or wherever a tough durable heat or chemical resistant finish is needed.Temperature: 550F (288C)
Applications: Headers, Engine Blocks, Starters, Brackets, Water Pumps, Valve Cover, Transmissions, Differential Covers
Finish: Flat, Satin, Gloss and Metallic
Dry Time: Dries to the touch in 30 mins. Dries thoroughly overnight.
Curing & Coating: (see more details (http://www.tcpglobal.com/spraypaintdepot/VHT-curing/curing_VHT-EE.html#curing))

Choose a color below. Each can is $6.98.

Curing Engine Enamel™
VHT Engine Enamel only attains its unique properties after correct curing.


Bake at 200F (93C) for 20 minutes.

Anthony Welch
04-27-2012, 11:15 PM
Dee, what do you use to bake it in? I have a small toaster oven to cure small power-coated parts I use for my pens.
But you can't use it for food items. Thinking your using something as big as an oven.

Dee Gallo
04-27-2012, 11:56 PM
Dee, what do you use to bake it in? I have a small toaster oven to cure small power-coated parts I use for my pens.
But you can't use it for food items. Thinking your using something as big as an oven.

I have a small toaster oven I use for bending acrylic too, but I would just use a regular oven for this paint... so what do you do? Get a used junker of an oven at some yard sale for cheap? Take it to a ceramic place for a low cone firing? I don't know, I haven't tried it. I just don't put the covers in the oven. You don't need to, nobody bakes with the covers on things unless they are using a dutch oven or similar... not a baking pan.