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View Full Version : Now THIS is woodworking!



Scott Loven
05-18-2005, 2:49 PM
I would like to do work like this some day!

http://www.nt.sakura.ne.jp/%7Egarakuta/wood/mftr/skep/indexe.htm

Scott

Ted Shrader
05-18-2005, 2:51 PM
That is very interesting. Thanks for the link.

Ted

Jim Stastny
05-18-2005, 3:12 PM
Really incredible to see that done with hand tools, and to think he found the lumber!

Jim Becker
05-18-2005, 3:54 PM
Very instructive and wonderful woodworking technique. He has some good subtle humor, too! Thanks for sharing!

Robert Mayer
05-18-2005, 4:39 PM
I think he needs to sell some lumber to us. 1bf for cherry?

Scott Loven
05-18-2005, 5:49 PM
I paid $.60/a BF for mine!

I saw that he built it for SWAMBO, what does the A stand for, Always? I know the rest.
Scott

Vaughn McMillan
05-18-2005, 6:19 PM
This guy does remarkable work, and it's a kick reading his narrative. I support my WW habit as a tech writer for a software company, and I deal with several contacts in Japan, and most of them break English in much the same way. All I know is this gentleman writes much better English than I do Japanese. ;)

- Vaughn

John Hart
05-18-2005, 7:13 PM
I think it's funny that he asked for advice at the end....Like he needs any!

Beautiful....Nice presentation too.

Steve Beadle
05-18-2005, 7:17 PM
Fascinating and very charming. I will have to check it out several times to let it soak in, I think. I love the way his personality comes through!

Dev Emch
05-18-2005, 8:11 PM
Very Nice! Clearly he understands woodjoinery. No kreg pockets here.

Couple of observations. He was considering using raised panels and then opted not to. Is it me or have others noticed that the use of panel raising has gotten a bit out of control. That even the classical straight cut raised design is getting a bit over the top not to metion the multitude of curved patterns available. Seems everyone has the same shaper cutters and so hobby projects resemble furniture store items which resemble home depot kitchen cabinets. It all looks the same. This guy chose a simpler pattern not because of a lack of tooling but rather for simplicity. Simplicity which emphasizes the wood. I have had a long standing rule. I never use complex patterns for either the cope and stick mouldings nor the panel raising profiles when i am using figured woods and veneers. Its just too hard on the eyes even though most folks dont quite see why its hard on the eyes. And the shakers did away with the panel raising as well. Here, this gent is doing the same. Doesn't this look good? Very simple. Very clean. Very elegant. Notice how the larger than normal number of panels are not over-competeing for attention?

Another thing I noticed that is relativly new is the cope and stick profile. Its a simple bevel. Now when it comes down to the joints, he is using fully coped tenon cuts. This is actually correct in that no stub tenon is being used. But I just like how that simple bevel flows into the greater scheme of things. It offers just a bit of paazzzz but in no way attempts to overpower the design. It offers a simple frameing of the panel which sits flat within its grooves. Also note the size and angle of the bevel. Home Depot had some cabinet doors that were sporting a type of moulding edge bevel. This is not the same. It appears larger and more prominent. Very nicely done.

Lastly, notice his use of cross members. This works at keeping lateral migration a bit under control. Did you guys notice the use of those large prominent dovetails? Locking the joint in the direction(s) of migration. Very nicely done.

Ian Abraham
05-18-2005, 8:32 PM
I navigated back to his home page and had a look at his other stuff also.

http://www.nt.sakura.ne.jp/~garakuta/wood/english/index.htm

He has a set of pages on sawing the logs using his shop bandsaw. I like the extra feeed table that sticks out the shop window for loading logs:) . "Sawmill is not open if it is raining or snowing" :D

http://www.nt.sakura.ne.jp/~garakuta/wood/english/esawmil/sawmill.html

Thanks for posting that Scott, I too like seeing how other people around the world do things.

Cheers

Ian

Bobby Hicks
05-19-2005, 9:38 AM
Creekers,

Here's another Japanese woodworker site. I really enjoy looking at these. It gives you a different perspective.

This guy makes a lot of his own tools from stuff people are getting rid of or things he finds.

<http://homepage3.nifty.com/manasan/english/english.htm>

Ole Anderson
05-19-2005, 1:38 PM
My goodness, now that IS woodworking.

What really caught my attention in this:
http://www.nt.sakura.ne.jp/~garakuta/wood/english/index.htm

is the background music (Bach and his Jesu Joy...) anyone know how to capture that for my future enjoyment?

Takeshi Uchida
05-25-2005, 12:38 PM
Hi creekers. Thank you for many compliments for my shoe cabinet.

I'm glad to know some of Western woodworkers like simple design. I was afraid if the simplicity may give somewhere shabby impression.
I like hand tools as I know I'm not good at operating power tools. and It's too powerful for me . and I cannot have enough time to understand and talk with wood. I'm a hobby woodworker and I like and enjoy the time with wood.

BTW, this forum is really great. Livery, earnet and instructive. I added this site to favorite in my browser.

Christian Aufreiter
05-25-2005, 12:54 PM
Thanks for this link, it's a great and very informative site.

Regards,

Christian

Peter Gavin
05-25-2005, 12:55 PM
Takesha,

Thank you for sharing your work with us. It is beautiful. And welcome to the creek!

Peter

Scott Coffelt
05-25-2005, 1:07 PM
I really enjoyed it. I have saved the site and will review it again. I especially liked the joints and may have to sample some of those at a point.

Erin Raasch
05-25-2005, 1:44 PM
Hi creekers. Thank you for many compliments for my shoe cabinet.

I'm glad to know some of Western woodworkers like simple design. I was afraid if the simplicity may give somewhere shabby impression.
I like hand tools as I know I'm not good at operating power tools. and It's too powerful for me . and I cannot have enough time to understand and talk with wood. I'm a hobby woodworker and I like and enjoy the time with wood.

BTW, this forum is really great. Livery, earnet and instructive. I added this site to favorite in my browser.

Welcome to the Creek, Takeshi-san. I must say that I really enjoyed browsing your site. You capture what is, to me, the essence of working with wood - understanding and appreciating the wood and where it comes from, and transforming it from something of natural beauty to something of a different kind of natural beauty.

I hope you visit often, as I think many of us can learn a lot from you and your joinery techniques. I know that I certainly intend to study the information on your website!

BTW, you might also want to visit the Neanderthal Haven - it's where we talk about woodworking with hand tools.

Erin

Bob Smalser
05-25-2005, 11:54 PM
Sorry, I don't know English name of this side frame joinery.Inside of frames were not routed yet....

http://www.nt.sakura.ne.jp/%7Egarakuta/wood/mftr/skep/skep6.jpg

http://www.nt.sakura.ne.jp/%7Egarakuta/wood/mftr/skep/skep7.jpg

If I'm seeing it correctly, and the front rail faces are mitered at the tenon shoulder on both sides...

...then the joint is a "bridled mortise and tenon."

If your tenon shoulder end grain is just mitered on the front face of the door, then it's a "half-bridled mortise and tenon." Your mitered bridle serves the same structural function as a western tenon haunch but is more attractive.

If you wedge or pin those tenons, then the name of the joint can quickly become a mouthful, depending on how you do it.

I'd probably just call it a "bridled mortise and tenon" and leave it at that. ;)

Nice work.

Vaughn McMillan
05-26-2005, 1:51 AM
Takeshi, I would also like to welcome you to The Creek. Please visit us often...we all like to share and learn from each other. Your woodworking is excellent. Much of the beauty in your work comes from its simplicity. Simple does not mean shabby at all, especially when it is so well-crafted.

I'm looking forward to studying your website more. I'm sure many of us will be adding your website to our favorites, too.

- Vaughn

John Lubeski
05-26-2005, 8:35 AM
Absolutely beautiful cabinet Takeshi! I have only one concern, and since I am far from being an expert, maybe other here can help explain.
http://www.nt.sakura.ne.jp/%7Egarakuta/wood/mftr/skep/skep5.jpg

Wouldn't the wood movement cause problems with the mitered corners of the cabinet top?

John L.

Steve Kubien
05-27-2005, 12:52 PM
Konnichiwa Takeshi-san,

"Migoto ni dekibae!" which should translate into 'beautifully done workmanship'. (I am trying to teach myself Japanese to compliment my jodo training).

Arigato gozaimasu!

Steve Kubien
Ajax, Ontario

Takeshi Uchida
05-30-2005, 10:39 AM
Hi John
I was anxious about the problem too.
If I intended to sell or present, I didn't assemble the top like that.
It was a trial to control warp and shrink.
I pressed the top boads firmly with clump for weeks.
and lock the horizontal lumbers (both end was frame with tenon) with side frame (frame with motise)
so the outside of tenon was tight and inside was
rather loose.

When assemble joinery, most of woodworkers strike tenon with hammer
to press the fiber. I did same with clump for the top.

I checked the shoe cabinet today. It has no problem and no gap.
I felt the end of tenon when I stroked the side of the top board, the frame was shrinked slightly)
In another project(Cup board, made with castor aralia ), I applied almost same pattern for the top.
(tenon is hidden in this project)
Castor aralia is light and soft wood and shrinks and warps badly so I used thick (1 1/6") lumber for the top,
almost same thickness as the wood had been dried for years.
(Refer to attached pics. please)

Hi Vaughn
and sorry. I don't remember but I heard I kicked you many time, and soryy again ,
I don't want but I will kick you in the future too. :D

Hi Bob
Thank you very much. Woodworking terms are few in dictionery and your advice helps me
for talking on woodworing with foreign woodworkers.
'mouthful' is good expression for joinery with wedge.

Hi Erin-san, it took few minutes to make out what Neanderthal means. and I had good laugh.
Sure, I'm a Neanderthal.So I have to visit Neanderthal Haven with chisel and hand plane...and stone axe?
I appreciate your comment 'transforming it from something of natural beauty to something of a different kind of natural beauty'.
very much. Your comment is just what I want to make.

Kelly C. Hanna
05-30-2005, 11:06 AM
Cool site! Thanks for sharing that...