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View Full Version : Are you happy with Titebond 3?



Mike Vermeil
08-08-2005, 8:39 PM
I'm curious to hear what you all think of Titebond III. I switched to it a while ago due to the advertised claims of longer working times, etc, but I'm not sure I'm sold on it.

I live in the Phoenix area where the temp is over 100 all summer long, so longer working times are a definite plus. But since switching to TB 3, it seems as the difficulty of my glue-ups has actually increased. Specifically, I'm having trouble keeping glued workpieces aligned during clamping. The glue seems to be skinning over very quickly retaining a wet pool of glue underneath that does not so easily "smash" when clamped. This wet pool of glue then allows the glue surfaces to easily slide back and forth across each other during clamping, even with the clamps as perpendicular to the glue surface as reasonably possible. I've been working wood for a long time now, and have never had such difficulty before. The only thing that has changed in my techinque is the glue, although I haven't been in PHX that long, so heat could be at least part of the issue.

Without starting another discussion of "glue creep", which has never been a problem for me, what do you guys think of Titebond III?

Steve Clardy
08-08-2005, 8:44 PM
Not happy with it. I threw my gallon away. I lost ten door panels with #3.
I went back to the original #1

Cecil Arnold
08-08-2005, 8:48 PM
I tried one bottle and gave most of that away much for the same reasons you meantioned. It just seemed to be too plastic-like and the initial holding power didn't seem to be there. Of the three formulations I really perfere TB I, but have changed over to Elmers pro bond after reading the tests in FWW (I think).

Don Baer
08-08-2005, 8:50 PM
Mike,

I got this from the Titebond web site.

<TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=611 border=0><TBODY><TR vAlign=top><TD width=105>Limitations</TD><TD width=5>http://www.titebond.com/images/clear.gif</TD><TD width=486>Not for continuous submersion or for use below the waterline. Not for structural or load bearing
applications. Use when temperature, glue and materials are above 45F. Store product below 75F.
Storage above this temperature may cause product to thicken and reduce the usable shelf life. If
thickened, shake vigorously by firmly tapping bottle on a hard surface until product is restored to
original form. Because of variances in the surfaces of treated lumber, it is a good idea to test for
adhesion. KEEP FROM FREEZING.
KEEP OUT OF THE REACH OF CHILDREN.</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>



it looked like it doesn't like temps in excess of 75 *F
I live in an arid region of Califoria and we've had temps in the high 90's. I use Elmers and have had no problems.

Mike Vermeil
08-08-2005, 8:50 PM
You know Cecil, I used to always use Elmer's ProBond and loved it. I don't know why I ever stopped using it. Thanks for the input.


I tried one bottle and gave most of that away much for the same reasons you meantioned. It just seemed to be too plastic-like and the initial holding power didn't seem to be there. Of the three formulations I really perfere TB I, but have changed over to Elmers pro bond after reading the tests in FWW (I think).

John Miliunas
08-08-2005, 9:34 PM
Not happy with it. I threw my gallon away. I lost ten door panels with #3.
I went back to the original #1

Steve, I'm curious. How did you "lose" 3 door panels? Did the glue fail or what? Thanks!:cool:

Dennis Peacock
08-08-2005, 9:38 PM
Used it...didn't like it and went back to Original and my Liquid Hide Glue. :D

Per Swenson
08-08-2005, 10:00 PM
I have the dissenting opinion.

I use it.

I like it. No, correct that.

I love it.

We buy it by the case. (4gal)

The only time I ever had a problem, I was gluing a emergency deal,

way behind schedual, out side when the temperature took a

dramatic dip. I ran the assembly inside and hit it with a heat gun

and saved it. Now I find it funny that I have no problems

with this glue and so many do. Maybe the glue Guru

could shed some light on this inconsistincy.

Per

Larry Copas
08-08-2005, 10:41 PM
The glue seems to be skinning over very quickly retaining a wet pool of glue underneath that does not so easily "smash" when clamped. This wet pool of glue then allows the glue surfaces to easily slide back and forth across each other during clamping, even with the clamps as perpendicular to the glue surface as reasonably possible.

Ive used TB-3 few times...mostly for the longer open time. Slip & slide in some glue ups get to be a problem with any of the glues. If I suspect there is going to be a problem :eek: I will use, maybe dowels, brads, or baby clamps to control things until I get the main battery of clamps on.

Couple of baby clamps to hold things until I get the big boys on. :)

Michael Ballent
08-08-2005, 10:57 PM
Living in Phoenix as well I know the importance of open time for glue ;) I have tried to do glue ups mostly in the night, just to take advantage of the "cooler" temps... It's still 105 at 10pm some nights. I had a friend that bought a bottle of TB3 and what he did not like was the way it stuck to the metal on some of his clamps... he had a heck of a time removing the excess, unlike original TB1 where it would just pop off. He lives in Phoenix as well...

Keith Christopher
08-08-2005, 11:30 PM
I, like Per love this stuff. I have used it for many of the glueups I've done lately. Poplar, Anigre, maple. Works like a champ.

Joe Blankshain
08-08-2005, 11:43 PM
I too live in the Phoenix area, but have come to appreciate TB3. It is alittle messy, but the bonding power seems to be better and the "open time" is just what I needed in the heat. I found that the only way to save the clamps is immediate wipe off of the drippings with a damp rag. Just my 2 cents.

Peter Pedisich
08-09-2005, 12:04 AM
I have used it in my basement on Long Island (65 degrees) to glue up some 5/4 Mahagony for shelves and it seemed too gummy at first but cleaned up well with invisible dried glue lines.

Drops of it are still on my Bessys, 1 year later.

Effie Lever
08-09-2005, 12:14 AM
I use it and I like it, but I noticed it does tend to stain clamps. I work in my basement so temperature is not an issue.

Effie

Mark Singer
08-09-2005, 1:00 AM
I really like TightBond 3 it seems very strong... Another great glue is Lee Valley 2002GFhttp://www.leevalley.com/images/item/woodworking/adhesives/62k0110s1.jpgIt is very good as well!!!

Robby Phelps
08-09-2005, 1:18 AM
I've been using TB3 for about 6 months now and I like it. Like any glue though it has its limitations and any good woodworker has quite an assortment of different glues as they all are good at different things. I like it for gluing up domestic wood species. It does not work on oily exotics, nor is it 100% water proof. Hope this helps.

Mike Cutler
08-09-2005, 6:21 AM
I have Titebond, Titebond 3, and Titebond extend. I find all of them a little messy to work with but have had no problems, such as you described, or creeping.
I think the temperature may be too high, or humidity too low where you are at, and is having an effect.
I recently began using epoxy to be able to cure the problem of short open times, a little more technique involved, but easy to work thru.

Dale Rodabaugh
08-09-2005, 7:03 AM
Just bought my first bottle of Tightbond III,havent tried it yet.Have used Tightbond II with good results.As for cleanup,there aint no easy glue cleanup.:eek:

Jim Hinze
08-09-2005, 9:23 AM
I did a bandsaw box out of bubinga. I mistakenly left the box in the car during one of the hot days and had a glue line become visible.. very visible. Probably would have happend with any yellow glue, but I was using TB3.

Other than that incident, no problems to report. I like it. Then again, I also like Elmer's pro-bond, much better consistancy.

I started using Unibond 800 for some of my marquetry work and like that even better. I may soon switch to all plastic resin glues... as of right now, I'm undecided.

Steve Clardy
08-09-2005, 10:12 AM
Steve, I'm curious. How did you "lose" 3 door panels? Did the glue fail or what? Thanks!:cool:


I was glueing up raised door panels. Did the usual. Glue, clamp, umclamp in about 30 minutes. Started running them through the planer. First one fell apart.
I took the others and put some slight pressure on the joints and they came apart.
I rejointed them and used my tried and true #1 with no problems.
Salesman seemed to think I got a bad batch. On raised door panels, it isn't worth the chance to have a failure again.

Chris Barton
08-09-2005, 10:15 AM
I used to be a TB fan and have tried just about every variation of their PVA glue line. That said, I use Elmer's Pro Bond almost exclusively for run of the mill glue ups, better consistency, easier control and application, and I seem to get more predictable results. I must say though that gule up time is a great stress evoker with PVA glues and I have been thinking for a while that it is time to make the plastic resin jump for anything more than a rudimentary glue up...

John Miliunas
08-09-2005, 10:34 AM
Steve, thanks for the additional info. Yeah, you may have gotten a bad batch, but who's to say it won't happen again and I can certainly understand your staying away from it!:)

Chris, I've heard of many folks extolling the virtues of the plastic resin glues, but as I understand it, once a batch is mixed, there's virtually no shelf life to the batch. Seems there would be an awful lot of waste, especially if one is just doing smaller projects. Mind you, I've not used the PR glue, as of yet, so this is mainly just a supposition on my part.:) :cool:

Greg Heppeard
08-09-2005, 10:40 AM
I was glueing up raised door panels. Did the usual. Glue, clamp, umclamp in about 30 minutes. Started running them through the planer. First one fell apart.
I took the others and put some slight pressure on the joints and they came apart.
I rejointed them and used my tried and true #1 with no problems.
Salesman seemed to think I got a bad batch. On raised door panels, it isn't worth the chance to have a failure again.

Steve,

I've done this with TB I and didn't have a problem. The problem you were experiencing with the III is that it has a longer set time. I've left the panels in clamps for an hour and haven't had a problem with III. I think you might have gotten them out too early. I know that in a production situation, time is money. I'd stick with the I, unless you had an outdoor project you were working on. When cured, TB III has a higher tensile strength than either I or II, it just takes a little longer curing.

John Hemenway
08-09-2005, 10:42 AM
I was glueing up raised door panels. Did the usual. Glue, clamp, umclamp in about 30 minutes. Started running them through the planer.

Perhaps 30 min. is not enough time for strength to develope? Since working time is longer, I would expect setup and strength of bond to be extended.

I use TB III in the winter when the temps are somewhat lower than the recommended minimum for TB II.

Mark Singer
08-09-2005, 10:52 AM
Steve,

I never start machining until 4 to 6 hours with any glue....Epoxy I usually let set overnight. If the joint moves just a bit you will see the glue line.

Jim Hinze
08-09-2005, 10:55 AM
John,

PR glues have virtually no pot life at all. But you can gauge how much your going to need and mix as desired. If you run out, you can also mix very quickly.



Chris, I've heard of many folks extolling the virtues of the plastic resin glues, but as I understand it, once a batch is mixed, there's virtually no shelf life to the batch. Seems there would be an awful lot of waste, especially if one is just doing smaller projects. Mind you, I've not used the PR glue, as of yet, so this is mainly just a supposition on my part.:) :cool:

Steve Clardy
08-09-2005, 11:07 AM
Steve,

I've done this with TB I and didn't have a problem. The problem you were experiencing with the III is that it has a longer set time. I've left the panels in clamps for an hour and haven't had a problem with III. I think you might have gotten them out too early. I know that in a production situation, time is money. I'd stick with the I, unless you had an outdoor project you were working on. When cured, TB III has a higher tensile strength than either I or II, it just takes a little longer curing.

I left two of the panels clamped up till the next day. They broke also. So thats about 24 hours on those two.

Don Henthorn Smithville, TX
08-09-2005, 11:46 PM
From what I have learned there is little advantage to either Titebond II or III for regular work. Original is good for most furniture.

Bill Fields
08-10-2005, 2:10 AM
Moke:

Thanks--a little eye-opener for us who live most of the year in 100 degree + temps.

NO WONDER I have had to bust up so many drawers that "slipped".

I use Gorilla a lot and no problems.

Bill Fields

Doug Shepard
08-10-2005, 9:23 AM
I recently bought a bottle of TB3 but haven't put any of it to use yet. For almost all of my PVA gluing, I've been using the Titebond II Extend with good results, which has about 5 more mins of open time vs the TB3. It solved most of my racing-to-get-glue-spread-and-clamped-before-the glue-sets-up problems and I haven't had any glue joint failure with it (knock on wood). It has a 5 deg. higher min. working temp, but that shouldn't be a problem for you in AZ. I thought I'd try the TB3 for smaller glue ups, but after reading some of the comments here .....

Jim Marshall
08-10-2005, 11:46 AM
Back when I was able to work, I built a lot of stairs with bending rails and used Elmers glue. When gluing up a bending rail with the Elmers, I had 20 mintues to get the clamps on or the rail was ruined. Some of the rails were pulled on a 3 foot radius and with that much tension you have got to have a good glue and you have to be moving to get it in place in 20 minutes. I have tried TB and several glues over the years and I always came back to Elmers because of the holding strength. A glue with more open time in stair building would be super, but if the strength isn't there it is no good IMHO.

I have had some problems in the past with joints moving even using Elmers and one thing I did to stop some of the movement was to drive a small nail in the joint and cut the nail off at an angle leaving about 1/4 inch of the nail sticking out. When the other part of the joint makes contact the nail is forced into the joint and keeps it from moving.

J.R. Rutter
08-11-2005, 1:40 AM
A furniture maker I worked for at one time told me a story about a bunch of his chairs being in a fire at the client's restaurant. The client complained to him that the joints fell apart (the wood was burned/charred, etc., but the guy was fixated on the joint failure) and asked what glue he used.

"Uh, National Casein"

"Well, you should have used Titebond, because that's the best."

His take away was for a couple of extra bucks in glue, he could piggyback onto their advertising. Now that Titebond III is the "ultimate wood glue" and has done quite well in magazine tests, I use it and have had no problems. If a customer ever asks, they know the've gotten the "best" (as far as they know).

Kevin Brown
08-11-2005, 11:15 AM
I have used TB3 without any problems, but I mostly use pro bond because I like the "flow" better.

Find what you like and use it, I have also used Minwax and Mylands without any problems :rolleyes: