PDA

View Full Version : Best way to get square End Cuts on long boards



tim walker
12-21-2005, 3:14 PM
I am building a cabinet that the face frames will be (stiles) 4" wide x 1 1/2" thick x 84" long. I plan on using loose mortise and tenon to attach the the rail which will be 4' x 1 1/2' x 60"?

What is the best way to assure the ends are square and a successful joint is achieved? My chop saw (cheap Delta) is too short to adeqquately support the longer stock. Would a Skil saw and a square be better here? Or should I set up my table saw (Powermatic 64) and attempt it there?

Thanks in advance,

TIm in Houston

Larry Crim
12-21-2005, 3:23 PM
I would cut the waste as close to the finished length as you can then use a router on a squared fence to finish it square. I'm sure someone has a better way but thats how I do it
Larry

Scott Loven
12-21-2005, 3:56 PM
Do you care about tear out? If so I would probably use a circular saw and a guide. Try a few test cuts. You could make a zero clearance template for the saw to improve the cut, a new blade would help. The miter saw would be my next choise. You could do zero clearance on this also. It would be hard to push an 84 inch board safely on a table saw even with a BIG sled.
Scott

aaron allen
12-21-2005, 4:16 PM
Tim,

As a cabinetmaker I would ask why you want to make T & M joints. If this some high end piece that you are making, I wonder if it is worth it. I'm trying to say this nicely, maybe you have over thought this.
4" wide on both pcs. right? Put a #10 biscuit in the middle and a pocket screw in above and below and call it a joint. It will be strong, flush and done quicker. Its the lengths that call for something other than T & M.
If you have to have a T & M joint after all this. Woodworkers supply had a jig that attached to the router, now the wood stays still and the router makes the tenon. I also seem to remember a article in FWW that you could build your own router setup for such a joint.
Scott is right, don't try to push it through a TS.

Brian Hale
12-21-2005, 4:28 PM
I'd go with the TS and a crosscut sled. You'll need to support the opposite end with a saw horse or something.

Brian :)

Alan Tolchinsky
12-21-2005, 4:55 PM
Something that long I'd go with a well tuned miter saw and only pocket screws for the joints. They should be plenty strong especially after you attach the face frame to the carcass.

Don Baer
12-21-2005, 5:11 PM
cut is slightly over on your CMS then use a hand plane and a shooting board...:D

tim walker
12-21-2005, 5:18 PM
Thanks all, this will be the front face for a wine cabinet and needs to be furniture quality joints. The thickness is due to the unit being refrigerated, so that is needed for insulation in front, just like a solid wood door on your house.

My next question would be how to effectively attach it to the carcass. The base of the carcass is 2x4 cypressI was thinking about biscuit joints for that.

Here is a pic of my ultimate goal.

Don Baer
12-21-2005, 5:22 PM
I would use dowles for joining the face to the carcase.

Steve Clardy
12-21-2005, 6:20 PM
Simple effective cutoff. Framers speed square. Nice quality saw blade.
I have the smart base on my saw, no chipout.

tim walker
12-21-2005, 7:11 PM
Steve, hate to show ignorance here but what is a smart base and is it made or bought?

Steve Clardy
12-21-2005, 7:25 PM
It's a guided saw system, produced by Eureka Zone.
PM me for details, as this is usually a heated subject around here.
E vs F

Roger Everett
12-21-2005, 7:58 PM
Tim:
This is an excellent opportunity to add a good miter saw to your shop, as it would be the best tool to use. For good support take a little time and whip up a table top base w/ extensions. I think your choice of a loose tendon and mortice would be the best joint to use for the size R&S you are using , I would also tend to pin the tendons, to add a pinch more strength.

Since you are building a wine cellar cabinet, you might find interest in a post I did a short time ago about a wine cellar cabinet I build for a client.
http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?t=26797 check this out and if I can be of any assistance e-mail me.
Roger

Richard Wolf
12-21-2005, 9:25 PM
I agree with Rodger. This is the job a miter saw or SCMS. It doesn't take long to tune them. All finish carpenter on site use them to do high end finish work. Making a square cut on a 1X4 is a piece of cake.

Richard

tim walker
12-21-2005, 9:41 PM
Roger, thanks for the input. I am designing from scratch after having seen a locally made wine cellar. It will ahve insulated glass doors and is pretty much all cherry. It should hold 350 bottles. (If I can move it after building). Two questions for you: What design did you use for the racks and what type of insulating gasket did you use (Source?) Oh and one more question, if your cabinet had 5 ft tall doors, what type of hinge system would you reccommend?

Thanks


Tim:
This is an excellent opportunity to add a good miter saw to your shop, as it would be the best tool to use. For good support take a little time and whip up a table top base w/ extensions. I think your choice of a loose tendon and mortice would be the best joint to use for the size R&S you are using , I would also tend to pin the tendons, to add a pinch more strength.

Since you are building a wine cellar cabinet, you might find interest in a post I did a short time ago about a wine cellar cabinet I build for a client.
http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?t=26797 check this out and if I can be of any assistance e-mail me.
Roger

Jim Kountz
12-21-2005, 9:43 PM
I agree with Brian here. This is a very simple operation with the right table saw setup. A crosscut sled and outrigger to support the end. Couldnt be easier. Same setup can be used to make the tenons on the ends as well, in lieu of loose tenons. I made a bed once with 8' rails and used this setup to mortise and tenon the frame together. Simple.