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Allen Bookout
07-13-2006, 10:22 AM
I am building a cabinet for use on a covered patio. Am using 1 1/2 x 3 with mortise and tenon for the frames with 3/4 plwood in dados. The humidity is usually very high here. Never gets below freezing. I need some working time as the largest panel is 3' x 8'.

What is the best glue to use in this situation?

Later on I am going to build one that will be subject to getting wet and some sun exposure. I am thinking for this one epoxy would be the only suitable choice. Any other suggestions for this one?

Allen

Carl Eyman
07-13-2006, 10:57 AM
I've probably spelled it wrong. It is an ugly purple color, but it holds like crazy and lasts forever. I made a cutting block with it 30 years ago that is still going strong.

Steve Wargo
07-13-2006, 11:02 AM
I would probably use epoxy.

Jerry Olexa
07-13-2006, 11:50 AM
A few years ago, I built 2 cedar outdoor garden benches. I used Gorilla glue or the PL that Woodcraft had on sale @ time. Had held up v well. Its suited for outdoors and I had tons of M/T joints. BUT it is messy and it expands so must be trimmed, cleaned up after it dries. It is strong and waterproof and a bit pricey....HTH Frankly, I'd probably look @ alternatives...

Aaron Beaver
07-13-2006, 1:39 PM
A few years ago, I built 2 cedar outdoor garden benches. I used Gorilla glue or the PL that Woodcraft had on sale @ time. Had held up v well. Its suited for outdoors and I had tons of M/T joints. BUT it is messy and it expands so must be trimmed, cleaned up after it dries. It is strong and waterproof and a bit pricey....HTH Frankly, I'd probably look @ alternatives...
Like Jerry I have used Gorilla Glue and it works great. I have started using a glue called Sumo by Loctite, it does not expand as much as Gorilla.

Cliff Rohrabacher
07-13-2006, 2:18 PM
I hsave trtied various adhesives for full exposure. So far the best ones are those that are used in marine apps such as Geocel.

The problems I have are almost always related to the dynamics of wood when exposed to high humidity. It moves so much that conventional products like paint and glues simply let go.

When building full exposure wood things I prefer to avoid relying on any adhesives at all and go with joinery that allows the wood to move while holding it snug with screws. If you are building for apps that will be submerged some of the time you might think about a bolt together frame and forget other options.

If you were building a boat things would be different all around.

Hoa Dinh
07-13-2006, 2:28 PM
Titebond III.

It's not just weather-proofed. It is water-proofed.

It's easy to apply, easy to clean up, requires no mixing, and has relatively long shelf life.

I stay away from PL glue. It has short shelf life and clean up is a chore.

Epoxy requires mixing - just too much hassle for me.

Allen Bookout
07-13-2006, 2:47 PM
Thanks for the choices!

I have built a couple of small boats and used bronze fastners and glued and encapsulated with West Epoxy but I did not want to build a $700 cabinet just for the patio. The epoxy is great except that you have to mix it up and you have a short time to use it in this heat. Also if I do not thicken the epoxy it is not a very good filler in case I have some spots that are not as tight as I hope for. I would not mind a little expansion or filling qualities. For these reasons I might try one of the other suggestions. I knew that there were some good options but have never used anything other than epoxy, Loctite Wood Worx and Titebond II. The Titebond II says that it is ideal for exterior aplications but have never use it in outside so do not know if I should trust it or not.

I appreicate the information that I am receiving.

Allen

P.S. Thanks Hoa! I was typeing when you posted so did not see your post. Titebond III looks like that it would be a better choice than Titebond II if I go that route.

Chris Padilla
07-13-2006, 3:52 PM
Titebonds are great...if you can assemble/adjust/clamp your project in under 10 minutes. :)

Open times are something to consider as well.

Vaughn McMillan
07-13-2006, 5:49 PM
What Chris said.

For longer open times, I'd think plastic resin glue (DAP/Weldwood) would be a workable choice. It's a relatively inexpensive powder mixed with water...I've had good success with it.

- Vaughn

Kent Parker
07-13-2006, 7:54 PM
[QUOTE]
For longer open times, I'd think plastic resin glue (DAP/Weldwood) would be a workable choice. It's a relatively inexpensive powder mixed with water...I've had good success with it.


Vaughn, Weldwood, makes a urea resin glue that is water resistant, not water proof. It is a great glue when your joints are tight, not so if you have a gap. We use to use it exclusively for building spars (which do stay outdoors) however the masts need to be varnished or painted for the glue seams to survive. Contact with moisture eventually softens it. This is a light brownish power mixed with water.

Dap/Weldwood also makes Resorcinal which is a two part power/catalyst that is a water proof glue that creates a thin purple glue line. Great outside, even below the waterline. This is a temperature critical glue during use.

Cheers,

Kent

Vaughn McMillan
07-13-2006, 8:20 PM
Vaughn, Weldwood, makes a urea resin glue that is water resistant, not water proof. It is a great glue when your joints are tight, not so if you have a gap. We use to use it exclusively for building spars (which do stay outdoors) however the masts need to be varnished or painted for the glue seams to survive. Contact with moisture eventually softens it. This is a light brownish power mixed with water.
Thanks for the correction, Kent. Good to have the information, since I mistakenly thought it weas waterproof. I've used it in some of my end grain cutting boards to combat creep, but I don't think they'll be subjected to the potentially continuous moisture exposure that an outdoor cabinet might. (Knock on Corian, to coin a phrase.) ;)

- Vaughn

Jesse Cloud
07-13-2006, 8:25 PM
I've had good luck with it. Used it for outdoor furniture that stays out in the snow, dust-storms, and 100 degree plus weather, not to mention New Mexico mountain UV.

Have to confess, though, that on the heavy load bearing parts, I'll use screws, but I would do that indoors, too.