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Pete Jordan
09-28-2006, 8:13 AM
I have read the threads for tool holders and have a question. I remember someone saying magnetic bars are bad for the tools. Is this the case? It seems like the easiest solution for me.

Thanks!

Mark Pruitt
09-28-2006, 9:40 AM
Pete,

I don't know about it being bad for the tool, but it seems to me that there would be a potential issue with the tool being magnetically drawn toward the tool rest at a point where you're trying to position it for a delicate cut. Also I can imagine a few tools currently in use, sitting on a table adjacent to the lathe, and when you go to pick one up you accidentally drag the other across the table--not dangerous but frustrating at least. Just my two cents.

Mark

edit: I probably should have stated this earlier, but what I'm referring to is the magnetic force that is generated in a piece of steel by virtue of its having made contact with a magnetic surface. Sorry for the lack of clarity.

Tyler Howell
09-28-2006, 10:00 AM
You can often magnatize the tool. This causes it to attract metal filings. This may or may not be a problem depending on its use..

Andy Hoyt
09-28-2006, 10:22 AM
The bar can cause the tool to become magnetized. You then put the tool on the toolrest and will suffer a loss of tool control. That in turn can lead to "unscheduled events".

At the other end of the spectrum there are a lot of folks who wax their toolrests to remove friction and increase glide-ability.

I seem to recall I tried to talk Bernie out of doing this a while back. But he had access to a de-magentizer. Wonder how that's working out?

Scott Donley
09-28-2006, 11:51 AM
I did notice that David Marks on his last show used magnetic bars for his chisel rack, he even took a few seconds of show time to point it out :D

Raymond Overman
09-28-2006, 11:52 AM
Not only being dragged toward the tool rest but during sharpening the filings are attracted to the magnetized tool making it difficult to clean. It's potentially dangerous since the metal filings stick to where you're holding the tool also.

Frank Fusco
09-28-2006, 11:57 AM
Ironwood shavings will stick to them. ;) :D

Gary DeWitt
09-28-2006, 12:18 PM
I saw a pic of one guys' shop where he had screw eyes in the back end of his tool handles and hung them on a board with nails. This seemed like a good idea, so I do the same. Doesn't seem to interfere with the wolverine sharpening system, either.
Just another solution, there must be many.

Joe Melton
09-28-2006, 5:37 PM
I put the screw eyes on the wood end of my tools and hang them from the ceiling. But then, I'm only 4' 10" tall.
Joe

Lloyd Frisbee
09-28-2006, 5:39 PM
I use one of these. I got it at the Borg. Cheap but sturdy. Holds all my turning tools.

Bernie Weishapl
09-28-2006, 5:52 PM
The bar can cause the tool to become magnetized. You then put the tool on the toolrest and will suffer a loss of tool control. That in turn can lead to "unscheduled events".

At the other end of the spectrum there are a lot of folks who wax their toolrests to remove friction and increase glide-ability.

I seem to recall I tried to talk Bernie out of doing this a while back. But he had access to a de-magentizer. Wonder how that's working out?

I haven't had any problems with the tools or using the tools on the tool rest. It doesn't seem to want to stick to the tool rest because it is magnatized. I do run it thru a demagnatizing unit that I use to demagnatize clock springs with before I sharpen. This keeps it clean of filings.

Frank Fusco
09-29-2006, 11:22 AM
I have seen ceramic magnets set into the handles and held to a steel plate that way. Keeps points down too.

Keith Burns
09-29-2006, 6:13 PM
I used the magnets for my tools for a long time. It did cause a certain "lack of control", especially for detail work. I use a wooden rack now. I also wax my rests.