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View Full Version : Drill bit & countersink sets--recs?



Rob Blaustein
02-18-2007, 7:02 PM
I'm looking for a pretty simple (like for #6, 8, and 10 screws) drill bit/countersink kit of better quality than the 3 included in my Costco $29 megacombo set, but I would also like one that will let me me drill and countersink a 2-3 inch pilot hole. Most of the kits I see at the Borg only include shorter bits. But there are times when I've needed to attach something to a wall/stud using 2 1/2 or 3 inch screws, countersunk, and I need to drill a pilot hole through 3/4" ply, then wallboard, then another say 1-2 inches into the stud. I would think this would be a stock item for a contractor or someone who makes/installs built-ins, but I never seem to find this sort of thing. Any recommendations?

Roy Bennett
02-18-2007, 7:13 PM
I don't have an answer for you, but I do have a similar question which may prompt some Creekers to answer both.

I would like to see a combo bit that would drill deeper passage holes. Most of the pilot-passage-countersink bits are adjustable for pilot hole depth, within the limit of the bit length, but only have a very short (1/8 or 1/4) length of the passage hole section. I commonly have to change to a passage hole size twist bit to drill through the top thickness of material and prevent crossthreading. This defeats the purpose of the combo bit!:mad:

David G Baker
02-18-2007, 7:15 PM
Rob,
I pre drill with the countersink drill and finish with a standard drill bit. It is a pain if you don't have two drivers but it will work in a pinch. I keep breaking the small sized bits so I make them as short as the countersink set will let me and finish up with the standard sized drill and that way they last much longer.
I also use Dawn dish soap as a lube for the long screws.
David B

Jeff Wright
02-18-2007, 7:15 PM
Fuller makes some high quality countersinks and bores, along with plug cutters. Maybe they have what you need. Woodcraft has a kit (pricey at $92.50) that includes sizes 6,8,10,12 and 14 wood screws.

Rob Blaustein
02-18-2007, 7:37 PM
Rob,
I pre drill with the countersink drill and finish with a standard drill bit. It is a pain if you don't have two drivers but it will work in a pinch. I keep breaking the small sized bits so I make them as short as the countersink set will let me and finish up with the standard sized drill and that way they last much longer.
I also use Dawn dish soap as a lube for the long screws.
David B
That's what I've been doing, but I figured I could use some better bits anyway, so why not spring for a nice kit. The soap does help. I guess an impact driver would too, but I haven't made that investment yet.


Fuller makes some high quality countersinks and bores, along with plug cutters. Maybe they have what you need. Woodcraft has a kit (pricey at $92.50) that includes sizes 6,8,10,12 and 14 wood screws.
I've seen those and have heard good things. I think they're tapered. For going into typical studs (fir I think) with 2 1/2 or 3 inch deck screws or #8 or #10 wood screws (I use square drive from McFeely's) would it matter?

Rob Blaustein
02-18-2007, 7:37 PM
I don't have an answer for you, but I do have a similar question which may prompt some Creekers to answer both.

I would like to see a combo bit that would drill deeper passage holes. Most of the pilot-passage-countersink bits are adjustable for pilot hole depth, within the limit of the bit length, but only have a very short (1/8 or 1/4) length of the passage hole section. I commonly have to change to a passage hole size twist bit to drill through the top thickness of material and prevent crossthreading. This defeats the purpose of the combo bit!:mad:

Roy--excuse my ignorance, but what's a passage hole?

Joe Unni
02-18-2007, 7:50 PM
Rob,

This is the best $60 I've spent. I messed around with several sets before (i.e. Dewalt, Makita, Instly/Rockler - all junk!) You can buy direct or from NYW. As far as 1"-2" further into a stud, I bet you won't find one. From my experience, I've never found it to be an issue as long as you get through (drill and counter) the top work piece. Even 1/2" into a stud goes a long way for making sure the screw goes in straight. After that, let the screw do the work.


http://www.newyankee.com/tool_photos/JRDLX-1.gif

I hope that helps.

-joe

Per Swenson
02-18-2007, 7:59 PM
Thats why I like this place,

I have the complete Fuller/Lee Valley set, couldn't be happier.

I also cringe when I take it out on a job site.

The Jack Rabbit looks like just the ticket for me and the road.

I'm sold.

Per

Rob Blaustein
02-18-2007, 10:56 PM
Thanks Joe, that looks great. When I searched Google for it, I hit upon a review (http://sawsndust.com/r-jackrabbit.htm) of the Jack Rabbit by our very own Jim Becker.

Per, do you like the LV set? I see that LV does have a longer bit (http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=40392&cat=1,180,42240) that can be used with their kits--do you use something like that for securing pieces to studs, or do you not worry about it, as Joe suggests.

Rob

Dan Forman
02-19-2007, 4:39 AM
Rob---Keep in mind that the Fuller set has a taper to the bit so that the hole conforms to the taper of the screw, something you wouldn't necessarily want with McFeely's screws, as they are not tapered like standard wood screws are.

I have a couple of the Fuller bits, but get annoyed with the way the countersink blades get impacted with wood fibers. Since I use mostly the Mcfeely screws, the taper doesn't work either. For regular wood screws the tapered bits are the cat's meow.

My favorite countersink now is this one, though it requires an extra step, the countersinks are VERY clean, and the extra time spent changing bits is balanced by the time saved by not having to disimpact them. With these, i can also use bradpoint bits. http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=32308&cat=1,180,42240,42281&ap=1

I tried the Snappy bradpoint set from McFeely's, but find the countersink holes are not very clean in hardwoods. They have quite short drillbits too.

One other possible choice to look at would be tha Amana set, can't remember what the bits look like, but the cutters for the countersink are carbide, stay sharp a lot longer. Don't know if they clog up as easily as the others.

Dan

Dan Forman
02-19-2007, 4:50 AM
Rob---I think a passage hole would be a wider hole in the first of two pieces being screwed together. The idea is that you don't want your threads to engage the first piece, the screw should turn easily within the first piece so that when the threads enter the second piece, the screw head pulls the first piece to the second, which cant really happen if threads are engaged in both pieces.

Dan

Rob Blaustein
02-19-2007, 11:04 AM
Rob---Keep in mind that the Fuller set has a taper to the bit so that the hole conforms to the taper of the screw, something you wouldn't necessarily want with McFeely's screws, as they are not tapered like standard wood screws are.
Dan
Thanks Dan-yes I wondered about the tapered bit issue for the screws I tend to use. Looks like the Jack Rabbit is the way to go. I did notice that countersink in the LV and will probably pick one up. Would the 3/8" one handle most of the sizes of wood screws that one would typically use (#6-10)?

Dan Lee
02-19-2007, 12:05 PM
Ive used the Jack Rabbit for years, best set I've ever had.
Thing I didn't like about Rockler taper bit/counter sink is the counter sink would would always get clogged

Don Bullock
02-19-2007, 1:13 PM
Are the drill bits in the jack Rabbit Kit tapered?

Dan Lee
02-19-2007, 1:32 PM
Are the drill bits in the jack Rabbit Kit tapered?

No they are not

Dan Forman
02-19-2007, 5:58 PM
Rob---I don't have any #10's, but I suspect they might require the 1/2" bit. A #8 pretty much fills up the smaller one. When I got mine, I just ordered the set of two, you save a couple dollars on the set.

Dan Lee---Same problem I had with the Fuller's, so the Jackrabbit's don't clog? How clean are the countersinks right at the surface, any tearout or chatter? Can you use a bradpoint bit with them?

Dan