PDA

View Full Version : Frued Glue Line Ripping Blade - $23.99 at Amazon



Tim Malyszko
02-21-2007, 10:51 AM
Just to let you know, the Frued 30-T Glue Line Ripping blade is on sale at Amazon.com for $29.99 + the 20% discount, which brings the cost down to $23.99.

Here's the link:
http://www.amazon.com/Freud-LM74M010-10-Inch-Triple-Ripping/dp/B00006XMTU/sr=1-1/qid=1172069055/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-9577702-6857737?ie=UTF8&s=hi

It's not the Perma Shield coated blade, but still one heck of a deal. This is the cheapest I've ever seen this blade and picked one up for myself.

Ken Werner
02-21-2007, 11:10 AM
Where is the 20% discount?

Tim Malyszko
02-21-2007, 11:15 AM
Where is the 20% discount?

Sorry.

Save 20% each on 10" & 12" blades, dados & router bits offered by Amazon.com when you purchase 1 or more. Enter code 2OOFFPTA at checkout

Mike Henderson
02-21-2007, 11:16 AM
Where is the 20% discount?
It showed up automatically when I went to checkout. No need to enter a code.

Mike

Dennis Putnam
02-21-2007, 1:41 PM
Just to let you know, the Frued 30-T Glue Line Ripping blade

OK, stupid question here. Other then what its name implies, what is a glue line ripping blade and why do I want one?

Jim O'Dell
02-21-2007, 1:47 PM
My question is if the price falls below 25.00 because of the discount, does it still qualify for free shipping? I'm not in the market for one, but this question could come into play on other items I might want to order in the future. Anyone know? Jim.

Gary Keedwell
02-21-2007, 1:49 PM
It is supposed to give a glue ready finish after you rip it. No need to run it through a jointer. Alot of quality blades will usually give the same results. IMHSHO

Gary K.:)

Glen Blanchard
02-21-2007, 1:51 PM
Will this blade create a flat bottom if used for a non-through cut?

Tim Reagan
02-21-2007, 1:54 PM
Woohoo! thanks for the update. I missed the price drop a couple of weeks ago.

Robert McGowen
02-21-2007, 1:57 PM
My question is if the price falls below 25.00 because of the discount, does it still qualify for free shipping? I'm not in the market for one, but this question could come into play on other items I might want to order in the future. Anyone know? Jim.

Yes, the shipping is still free. I ordered a 2-blade Dewalt combo yesterday and with the discount it was $23 and some change. Shipping was still free even though the total cost was under $25.

Dennis Putnam
02-21-2007, 2:03 PM
It is supposed to give a glue ready finish after you rip it. No need to run it through a jointer. Alot of quality blades will usually give the same results. IMHSHO

Gary K.:)
Thanks for the reply. I always thought the reason a jointer was needed was because the precision machined table was guaranteed to produce a perfectly flat finish at exactly 90 degrees to the side. A saw blade that can do the same thing? I am just a beginner here but the physics escapes me. How does this blade compensate for rotational imperfections that an ordinary blade can't? Can I take a jointer off my wish list? :)

Hoa Dinh
02-21-2007, 2:15 PM
Will this blade create a flat bottom if used for a non-through cut?
Almost, not quite.

To get a flat bottom, you need a blade with flat teeth. The blade in question has triple-chip teeth. The sides of the groove will be just slightly deeper than the center.

Tom Jones III
02-21-2007, 2:44 PM
Can I take a jointer off my wish list? :)

No. I've got this blade and it does a great job but it is not meant to replace a jointer. If you have milled a board to S3S and you need to cut it to width then glue it up, you can sometimes simply rip it to width with this blade and then glue it up. With most blades taking a light pass over the jointer after ripping would be mandatory.

Noah Katz
02-21-2007, 3:14 PM
"A saw blade that can do the same thing? I am just a beginner here but the physics escapes me."

A jointer by nature makes a curved cut because of its blade trajectory, whereas a TS blade tooth moves in a plane, so if the blade/arbor has no runout it should be a flatter cut.

I was told recently in another thread that an edge sander was used after the jointer, which squares with that.

Dennis Putnam
02-21-2007, 3:43 PM
A jointer by nature makes a curved cut because of its blade trajectory, whereas a TS blade tooth moves in a plane, so if the blade/arbor has no runout it should be a flatter cut.

I was told recently in another thread that an edge sander was used after the jointer, which squares with that.

OK but the key is what happens when you butt 2 pieces together for glueing. The jointer, as I understand it, makes all pieces precisely straight and at 90 degrees so that the seam is nearly invisible (the center relief also helps). What I am missing is how a blade can do this since there is all kinds of small errors in the blade's plane of rotation due to bearing wear, runout, etc. That makes for a wavy edge and 2 pieces will never match up identically as with a jointer. So what is special about this blade that can compensate for that where an ordinary blade cannot?

scott spencer
02-21-2007, 4:50 PM
It is supposed to give a glue ready finish after you rip it. No need to run it through a jointer. Alot of quality blades will usually give the same results. IMHSHO

Gary K.:)

I'm gonna squeeze two points into one post....neither necessarily directed to Gary.

1. I agree with Gary though. There are many good quality blades that will leave an edge clean enough to glue up "as is". I rarely use my jointer to clean up an edge. Some 24T rippers will leave a sufficiently clean edge, while most decent 40, 50 and 60 toofers will do a great job. I'm not saying a GLR is a bad idea, but since it's designed primarily for 1" stock or less, I'm just not sure what it'll do that a comparable quality 40T-60T blade doesn't do. So if you've got a nice LU84, LU83, LU86, P410, WWII, Gold Medal, TS2000, DW7657, etc., what additional capability does a 30T GLR offer and in what applications should be it be chosen in place of one of those blades?


2. No saw blade can replace a jointer. The jointer's primary purposes are to flatten a face of an imperfect board, then make an adjacent edge 90 square to that face. While a good blade can eliminate the need to clean up the edge on a jointer, it can't flatten the face of a non-flat board. A twisted board ripped on a TS will result in a twisted board with a smooth surfaced non-square edge, and it won't mate well to a flat board with a square edge.

Homer Faucett
02-21-2007, 6:42 PM
2. No saw blade can replace a jointer. The jointer's primary purposes are to flatten a face of an imperfect board, then make an adjacent edge 90 square to that face. While a good blade can eliminate the need to clean up the edge on a jointer, it can't flatten the face of a non-flat board. A twisted board ripped on a TS will result in a twisted board with a smooth surfaced non-square edge, and it won't mate well to a flat board with a square edge.

Well put. However, playing devil's advocate here, couldn't you pretty much use a bandsaw with a great fence set up much like a veneer fence to get your face cut close enough to flat so that your planer can do the rest? I know, I know, you meant a table saw, so I'm cheating here! I do agree with your sentiment, though.

With regards to previous posts about needing a jointer for gluing up S3S boards because a saw is not accurate enough, I would have to disagree. If you truly need a jointer when using S3S wood, what you really need is a new saw or saw blade . . . or maybe a good tuning of your old saw. I've glued up boards with no problem right off the saw.