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Christopher K. Hartley
04-23-2007, 4:04 PM
I am certain that no one else ever did this so I'll just tell a tail on myself. A little over a year ago I started turning after 40 + years of being (AWOL) "Absent With Out Lathe". Come to think of it I'm AWOL now! Ouch!:eek: Anyway, not being a woodworker type and being ignorant of all the things most of the guys here take for granted.:o I thought the best way to get a fine finish was to rely on out of the can type stuff. Now I know, that those things have their place but for me this buffing stuff was just something that I thought I could live without. Then I began to see some of the works displayed here and slowly began to realize that there must be something I was missing.:confused: A couple of the Vets here sent me a, so kind but straight forward chastising comment about finishes. I wanted to know what the heck they were getting at but I had no frame of reference to fully understand what they were saying. Well, to make a long story short, I got my Buffers hooked up over the weekend and thought I'd toy around just a bit with them on an unfinished bowl. The bowl has just a coat or two of Danish Oil and that is all. Wow! Now I can see the light at the end of the tunnel!:cool: What a beautiful luster.:p I have a growing anticipation of what is going to happen when "Beauty" gets here and not just my lathe has gone to the next level. Color me EXCITED!!:D an thanks for all your patience. I know I don't hail from Missouri but sometimes a 2 X 4 and a ten penny nail through the end applied smack between the eyes is just what I need to get the point. So, if you're new and as ignorant as I was, take heed. Don't waste a year trying to figure out how to get a great finish. Good Cutting followed by good sanding and a nice oil finish with a good buffing and you may find yourselves miles ahead of where I was.:)

Neal Addy
04-23-2007, 4:14 PM
:D :cool: :D :cool: :D :cool: :D :cool:

Roy McQuay
04-23-2007, 4:40 PM
Thank you Christopher. When I see the pics posted on here, I think you guys were born turners.

Steve Schlumpf
04-23-2007, 4:51 PM
Been turning for almost 2 1/2 years now but until 6 months ago I rubbed everything out by hand. Picked the buffing equipment when I got the new lathe this past Nov and what a MAJOR difference buffing makes. Now when I get finished with a project - the form may still be in question but the finish sure looks good!

Christopher K. Hartley
04-23-2007, 4:57 PM
Thank you Christopher. When I see the pics posted on here, I think you guys were born turners.I'm in the same boat as you!:)


Any day I wake us is a good day!Had to chuckle...In my business we say, 'Any day above ground is a good one!' And 'we're the last folks that will ever let you down!':D

Neal Addy
04-23-2007, 5:00 PM
Christopher, your post got me to thinking...

Looking back from a perspective of hindsight, the two biggest judgment errors I made as a new turner were:

1) I don't need a Beall buff, I'll save money and just buff with a T-shirt.
2) I don't need a Wolverine. I can do just as good of a job sharpening by hand.

HA!!! Wrong on both counts!

Hmmm... I'm still in denial about a hollowing rig. Wonder if it will be #3?

Mike Vickery
04-23-2007, 5:10 PM
I agree 100%. I got a buffing setup about 3 or 4 months ago and the difference is night and day. I used to be ashamed of my finish and now I am proud.

Paul Zerjay
04-23-2007, 5:13 PM
You got something against Missourians? :D

Craig Zettle
04-23-2007, 5:17 PM
Thanks for the heads up Christopher, as I am new to turning and that is EXACTLY the kind of advice I want and need. I don't frequent SMC to throw 2 worthless cents down any time I can, I come here for advice, and if I happen to have some, I'll gladly give it away. For free, no less.

Mark Pruitt
04-23-2007, 5:19 PM
The bowl has just a coat or two of Danish Oil and that is all. Wow! Now I can see the light at the end of the tunnel!:cool: What a beautiful luster.:p
Hey Chris, if you think that DO plus Beall is awesome, try Seal-a-Cell on top of the DO then buff the Seal-a-Cell. Looks like a piece of glass.:eek: Not speaking from any vast amount of experience; I've only SAC'd six pieces. (I'll post 'em if I ever get around to setting up my photo tent.)

Christopher K. Hartley
04-23-2007, 5:21 PM
You got something against Missourians? :DNo! just me!:D :D

Christopher K. Hartley
04-23-2007, 5:24 PM
Hey Chris, if you think that DO plus Beall is awesome, try Seal-a-Cell on top of the DO then buff the Seal-a-Cell. Looks like a piece of glass.:eek: Not speaking from any vast amount of experience; I've only SAC'd six pieces. (I'll post 'em if I ever get around to setting up my photo tent.)Thanks mark, I'll try that. I appreciate the help. One question, is it yellow?:D :D :)

Mark Pruitt
04-23-2007, 5:28 PM
One question, is it yellow?:D :D :)
Only if the piece is yellowheart.:D (And yes that's one of the six I SAC'd.)

Paul Zerjay
04-23-2007, 5:37 PM
I discovered the Beal system awhile back and use it regularly. One thing I've learned is if you have a porous grained, dark wood (Walnut) skip the white diamond. BTW Chris I think the term "show-me" was coined directly for me! :D

Christopher K. Hartley
04-23-2007, 5:43 PM
Christopher, your post got me to thinking...

Looking back from a perspective of hindsight, the two biggest judgment errors I made as a new turner were:

1) I don't need a Beall buff, I'll save money and just buff with a T-shirt.
2) I don't need a Wolverine. I can do just as good of a job sharpening by hand.

HA!!! Wrong on both counts!

Hmmm... I'm still in denial about a hollowing rig. Wonder if it will be #3?No doubt neal I just got mine.:)

Christopher K. Hartley
04-23-2007, 5:45 PM
Christopher, your post got me to thinking...

Looking back from a perspective of hindsight, the two biggest judgment errors I made as a new turner were:

1) I don't need a Beall buff, I'll save money and just buff with a T-shirt.
2) I don't need a Wolverine. I can do just as good of a job sharpening by hand.

HA!!! Wrong on both counts!

Hmmm... I'm still in denial about a hollowing rig. Wonder if it will be #3?No doubt Neal, I just bought mine.:)

George Tokarev
04-23-2007, 5:50 PM
Always a choice as to whether you want to buff the wood or the finish.

If you buff the wood, you sacrifice some iridescence. Don't do it to curly figure. Instead, apply the clearest finish you can and buff the finish, though it's tough to buff a smoother surface than good flow can give.

As the boys on the flat side can tell you, and any number of articles and photomicrographs can testify, the most lively surface is a cleanly cut one. We see it when the first grit dulls our cut and burnished surface all the time.

Careful what you do, lest you get something you didn't want.

Christopher K. Hartley
04-23-2007, 5:57 PM
Always a choice as to whether you want to buff the wood or the finish.

If you buff the wood, you sacrifice some iridescence. Don't do it to curly figure. Instead, apply the clearest finish you can and buff the finish, though it's tough to buff a smoother surface than good flow can give.

As the boys on the flat side can tell you, and any number of articles and photomicrographs can testify, the most lively surface is a cleanly cut one. We see it when the first grit dulls our cut and burnished surface all the time.

Careful what you do, lest you get something you didn't want.Great advice George. Thanks:)

Aaron Hamilton
04-23-2007, 9:25 PM
Can someone expound on the buffing system? I see the name Beall used several times. Is this a handheld buffer? Do you use a compound? etc...

Corey Hallagan
04-23-2007, 10:39 PM
Chris, how durable are these finishes that have been buffed out like that. Are they somewhat temporary and with handling the glassy look will go away? Just curious on this.

Corey

Pete Jordan
04-23-2007, 10:53 PM
No doubt neal I just got mine.:)

Say What?:eek:

You bought a hollerin system for your alleged lathe!:D

Which one did you buy?

Alex Cam
04-23-2007, 11:16 PM
What do the majority of people use? Looks like you can pick the "on-lathe" system up for about $90. Is there a drawback to not having a dedicated station?

Ken Fitzgerald
04-24-2007, 1:45 AM
Alex..........I have the on the lathe system......drawback....the different buffs are about 5" apart and thus when your buffing you can polish your knuckles on one buff while buffing on the other buffs....Of course you can wax them too!:rolleyes: That's the only drawback I've noticed.

George Tokarev
04-24-2007, 8:43 AM
Can someone expound on the buffing system? I see the name Beall used several times. Is this a handheld buffer? Do you use a compound? etc...

Brand name. Cotton wheels and the compounds you remember from metal working. Lots of people let their lathe do double duty as the buffer rather than using a dedicated motor or their grinder or sander motor. I spin my wheels on the same motor that does my pneumatic and mop sanding, but I think only one muslin wheel is a Beall. Bought it to see if there were a difference, and found there wasn't.

Seems there's a particular cachet associated with the brand which means it's mentioned rather than simply saying buffed finish or buffed surface.

Dale Bright
04-24-2007, 9:23 AM
The buffing system at this site, http://www.donpencil.com/, looks good. I am thinking about geetting this one. Dose anyone have experience with it?

Thanks

Brodie Brickey
04-24-2007, 10:04 AM
I've used the Wood N Things system. Works good. The best part is that you have individual wheels for the buffing instead of three in a row.

The bowl buffs are nice too.

Christopher K. Hartley
04-24-2007, 3:03 PM
Chris, how durable are these finishes that have been buffed out like that. Are they somewhat temporary and with handling the glassy look will go away? Just curious on this.

CoreyCheck with some of the others as I'm just learning this, but it looks pretty good for lasting.:)

Christopher K. Hartley
04-24-2007, 3:12 PM
Say What?:eek:

You bought a hollerin system for your alleged lathe!:D

Which one did you buy?
She's in pain! I hear her Hollerin from the storage shelves, "Brent. Assemble me...Brent, ship me!!!:D :D :eek: Let me dress up with my Kelton!":)

Christopher K. Hartley
04-24-2007, 3:15 PM
What do the majority of people use? Looks like you can pick the "on-lathe" system up for about $90. Is there a drawback to not having a dedicated station?Off Lathehttp://www.sawmillcreek.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=62208&d=1176329888

Mike Vickery
04-24-2007, 4:15 PM
The buffing system at this site, http://www.donpencil.com/, looks good. I am thinking about geetting this one. Dose anyone have experience with it?

Thanks

I actually like the way that system attaches to the lathe a lot better than the beall ( I am talking about the bowl buff not the three on the lathe). I have the Beall. With the Beall lathe adaptor I have to use a draw bar since it goes in the Morse taper. With their adapter you just screw it onto the spindle. Sometimes little stuff can make a big difference.

Bill Wyko
04-24-2007, 4:17 PM
To become great at what you do you must first listen to those that are better than you....... Then become better than them:eek: :D I hear you Christopher, finish is my weakest point. To me it's like watching grass grow.:cool: Hey did you happen to get the segmented design I sent you?

Christopher K. Hartley
04-24-2007, 4:23 PM
To become great at what you do you must first listen to those that are better than you....... Then become better than them:eek: :D I hear you Christopher, finish is my weakest point. To me it's like watching grass grow.:cool: Hey did you happen to get the segmented design I sent you?Yes I thought I sent you a PM on it Thanks. I told you in it i would probably be bothering you quite a bit. Boy did you walk into that door!:D :)

David Little
04-24-2007, 9:51 PM
I just bought the Beal on-lathe system over the weekend. The instructions that came with it don't go into much detail. For example, what speed do you typically use while you're buffing? Do you use different speeds with the different applications?

Mark Pruitt
04-24-2007, 9:54 PM
I just bought the Beal on-lathe system over the weekend. The instructions that came with it don't go into much detail. For example, what speed do you typically use while you're buffing? Do you use different speeds with the different applications?
The instructions with my Beall say 1725 RPM, which is what I use. That's for the wheels. I also have the ball-shaped buffs which I run at a higher speed.