PDA

View Full Version : Biesemeyer/T-square type fence question...



Jason White
08-26-2007, 12:54 PM
Since the Biesemeyer/T-square style fence only locks to the front rail and not the rear, how does one keep the fence from lifting if using featherboards or jigs that push down on the stock?

Anybody experience this "lift" and how do you deal with it?

JW

Jim Heffner
08-26-2007, 2:23 PM
Jason, I have the Delta T-2 fence which is a Biese clone, it has a small metal clip that hooks over and around to the bottom side of the rear fence rail....it may help in the area you described about lifting up at the rear...but I don't think it does much good in that respect. I have never had any trouble with the rear of my fence lifting up when using any featherboards or any attachments to it. The weight of the fence pretty much takes care of that problem as I see it. Jim Heffner

Greg Peterson
08-26-2007, 2:49 PM
Jason - the Biesmeyer is a pretty heavy duty fence. It is relatively heavy and the front rail that it clamps to is substantial. The combination of the weight of the fence, the locking mechanism used to secure the fence to the rail and the sheer beef of the rail go a long way towards preventing the fence from lifting.

In my experience, the Biesmeyer is not prone to 'lifting'. I'm sure it could be done, but by the time enough force is being exerted to create this condition I think there may be more pressing concerns occurring, albeit rather quickly.

Also, the performance of the blade needs to be considered. Feather boards merely assist in keeping stock flat against an opposing surface as it is fed through the blade. Not much opportunity for the blade to lift the stock (if you're using a riving knife or splitter). With proper technique having a fence lift off the table top isn't a problem.

Seumas McCombie
08-26-2007, 3:28 PM
macduff uses the fixed or stationary fence which eliminates lift and or deflection of the fence.

Jason White
08-26-2007, 5:21 PM
That's what I was hoping. Thank you.

JW


Jason - the Biesmeyer is a pretty heavy duty fence. It is relatively heavy and the front rail that it clamps to is substantial. The combination of the weight of the fence, the locking mechanism used to secure the fence to the rail and the sheer beef of the rail go a long way towards preventing the fence from lifting.

In my experience, the Biesmeyer is not prone to 'lifting'. I'm sure it could be done, but by the time enough force is being exerted to create this condition I think there may be more pressing concerns occurring, albeit rather quickly.

Also, the performance of the blade needs to be considered. Feather boards merely assist in keeping stock flat against an opposing surface as it is fed through the blade. Not much opportunity for the blade to lift the stock (if you're using a riving knife or splitter). With proper technique having a fence lift off the table top isn't a problem.

Jason White
08-26-2007, 5:22 PM
Huh? Sorry, I don't know what you're talking about.

JW


macduff uses the fixed or stationary fence which eliminates lift and or deflection of the fence.

Ken Shoemaker
08-26-2007, 5:40 PM
I second the weight of the fence counteracting any lifting force. In fact, I'd think that if you had a fetherboard toqued down enough to lift a properly engadged fench, you probably wouldn't be able to push your wrok thru. That's my thought but franky, I don't have the fuzz on the kiwi's to test the theory. Good luck..

Seumas McCombie
08-26-2007, 7:42 PM
Huh? Sorry, I don't know what you're talking about.

JW
In Manufacturers Forum
under Eureka Zone
(EZ-Smart System)
see table saw safety- The Jimmy Jig

Gary McKown
08-26-2007, 10:26 PM
I agree that under "normal" use the fence will not raise much if at all. That said, if I am dealing with substantial lumber and want to make sure, I just clamp the rear end to the rear of the saw or to the back end of the outfeed table. On my Shopfox with outfeed, , just insert a 2X3-ish in the end of the tube and clamp it down.