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Tom Godley
11-14-2007, 2:59 PM
I am getting ready to make a new shop table - Years ago I remember my grandfather had this great old table that he worked on - If my memory is correct it was square.

I am not talking about a workbench - this would not have any type of vise - more like an assembly table. I do not want to be hitting a vice when I work!

Does anybody have a one that they find ideal -- I was thinking of something like 50"x50"

Does that sound about right?


Thanks

TAG

Charles Wiggins
11-14-2007, 3:06 PM
I am getting ready to make a new shop table - Years ago I remember my grandfather had this great old table that he worked on - If my memory is correct it was square.

I am not talking about a workbench - this would not have any type of vise - more like an assembly table. I do not want to be hitting a vice when I work!

Does anybody have a one that they find ideal -- I was thinking of something like 50"x50"

Does that sound about right?


Thanks

TAG

Tom,

If I was going to do an assembly table I would do one similar or Marc Spagnuolo's. You can watch video about its' creation at (http://thewoodwhisperer.com/archive). Go to episodes 18 & 19. You'll need Quicktime (http://www.apple.com/quicktime/download/) or another player that will run MP4.

Tom Godley
11-14-2007, 3:12 PM
wow - what a great site.

Thanks ---- work can wait :)

Matt Meiser
11-14-2007, 4:51 PM
Norm made a cool one a few years ago. The episode just ran this past week on DIY. You can see pictures on the NYW web site, and if you have DIY, I'm sure it will run again. It was fairly lightweight and made mobile with casters that swing up when not in use.

Rob Bodenschatz
11-14-2007, 5:31 PM
If I was going to do an assembly table I would do one similar or Marc Spagnuolo's.

Me too. It's on my list of projects. That's a great design. I'm thinking about putting it on casters too.

Bruce Haugen
11-14-2007, 5:38 PM
David Marks produced one (prolly a rerun, but the episode aired over the weekend here) that was remarkably similar to Marc Spagnuolo's. I'd recommend the process. I made a similar one a bunch of years ago that I think isn't quite as good, but I like it better because it's shorter. The height of the table top is 27", 48" L X 36" W. I'd make the top wider but not higher. The ends are not open, but are frame and panel, 3X3" legs with 1/2" plywood panel let in. It is very sturdy.

I don't have a power strip on it, but I do have a 4-plex metal outlet box fed by a custom 12-ga cord. I'm thinking that one on both ends might be a good thing.

The base houses big stuff like my router table and lunch box planer. I have an exceedingly small area for my shop, so everything has to do double duty.

Bruce

Bill VanderLaan
11-14-2007, 6:14 PM
I built the one that Norm built and like it a lot. The best part about it is that it is mobile and you can replace the MDF top.

Eric Gustafson
11-14-2007, 6:45 PM
David Marks produced one (prolly a rerun, but the episode aired over the weekend here) that was remarkably similar to Marc Spagnuolo's.

Marc attended David's workshop and the two are now friends, so it is more than coinky-dinky! I also built Marc's version and it turned out very well. ATM I have only built the top. The cabinet is waiting for other projects to complete.:rolleyes:

Bill Wyko
11-14-2007, 7:24 PM
I will back Eric up on his torsion table. It's been under a patio cover for a few months now and sitting on some saw horses waiting for the room in his shop and it's still dead nuts flat. Great way to go.

Matt Meiser
11-14-2007, 8:27 PM
You could also build Norms table, but put David Marks's top on it. IIRC, the Woodworks episode only covers a top and leaves the base design to the viewer.

Don L Johnson
11-14-2007, 8:50 PM
Mine isn't pretty, nor is it expensive...nor does it take much time to make. I bought 2 of the plastic type saw horses at Lowes...the ones that you can extend the height on and they also have a place to set 2x4's on top.

I built a quick truss on the top, bought a 4' x 8' sheet of melmine and set it on top. I really like it at the high location, as I'm now building a table and the height is a little above the waist, which makes it easy to work with. If I need, I can lower it later, and for that matter, fold it up and get it out of the way.

Like I said, it's not fancy!

Cliff Rohrabacher
11-14-2007, 10:01 PM
Make it a Torsion box and a hefty one at that and you'll always have a flat surface. Top it with pressure laminate.

John Grossi
11-14-2007, 10:46 PM
I just saw NYW last weekend, with Norm building a mobile table . He recommends building it the same height as your table saw. Just wheel it up to the saw, pull the rope up letting the casters flip up and you have a great outfeed table. It is versitile, strong, and lightweight. It will be my next project.

John Crum
11-15-2007, 1:59 AM
Fine Woodworking has plans and instructions for building a torsion box assembly table on their site. I just downloaded the plans and am in the process of building one with a few modifications.

Jim Becker
11-15-2007, 6:25 AM
Tom, seriously consider a shop table that you can have at different heights if you plan on using it for assembly. One common way to accomplish this is to build a torsion box table surface and then build four rectangular "boxes" that can be set in different configurations to vary the surface height. All of this can also be easily stored when you have a large project that is best suited to being on the floor or on a dolly. Flexibility is the key. The issue with fixed height tables is that they don't address comfort and access as well as your project size varies.

Tom Godley
11-15-2007, 10:50 AM
I think I need a shop table to make a shop table!

Matt Meiser
11-15-2007, 11:24 AM
That's not far from the truth Tom. David Marks covers that in the Torsion Box episode of woodworks.

Charles Wiggins
11-15-2007, 12:00 PM
I think I need a shop table to make a shop table!

Spagnoulo covers that in his Assembly Table Torsion Box video as well.

Don Dean
11-15-2007, 7:45 PM
Fine Woodworking has plans and instructions for building a torsion box assembly table on their site. I just downloaded the plans and am in the process of building one with a few modifications.

I just looked at the torsion box article at Fine Woodworking. I noticed that they used staples instead of toe nailing the grid. What is the thoughts of those who have built torsion boxes think about using staples?

Ben Grunow
11-15-2007, 9:22 PM
Got one here made form simple 2x4's and couple layers of ply for the top. Had 2 casters so it has 2 and the other legs rest on the floor making it quite stable. Same height as the other tops in the shop (TS and long bench) so that is convenient. Cheap and simple.

see here

http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?t=48367

scroll down to see several pics where it is visible. I pick up one side and roll it out of the way when using the TS for sheet stock.

Hope that helps.

Ben

Dave Shively
11-15-2007, 10:19 PM
I made this one right after I built my shop. The size is 4 feet by 8 feet and is
the same height as my table saw so it helps as an extension for long stuff.
The top has a full 1/4 inch sheet of UMHW which helps when glue drips and then
dries on the surface. It then just flakes right off. It is on 5 inch casters so I can
roll it around the shop to get it out of the way. I use it more than anything else
in the shop. I had planned to put some doors on it but I never seem to find the
time. I have ample storage space below as you can see.

Dave

http://pic80.picturetrail.com/VOL846/862115/1592586/36139642.jpg
http://pic80.picturetrail.com/VOL846/862115/1592586/36139601.jpg
http://pic15.picturetrail.com/VOL573/3197729/6523784/119969153.jpg
http://pic15.picturetrail.com/VOL573/3197729/6523784/191509401.jpg
http://pic15.picturetrail.com/VOL573/3197729/6523784/155202647.jpg