PDA

View Full Version : David Marks - Woodsniffer



Joe Petersen
02-10-2008, 1:47 AM
I love this show because of the IMPOSSIBLE projects he makes. My wife gives me a hard time about how weird he is and we call him the Woodsniffer. I don't have the heart to tell her I sniff wood too.

Anyone ever notice when he drills a hole he seems to have a third hand. He has both hands on the project and the drill quill magically lowers to drill the hole.

Aaron Dunham
02-10-2008, 2:24 AM
I've tried for a long time to figure out his accent - can't quite pin it down.

Jason Koon
02-10-2008, 2:49 AM
Anyone ever notice when he drills a hole he seems to have a third hand. He has both hands on the project and the drill quill magically lowers to drill the hole.



I noticed that too. I figured out, as i'm sure you did, that he has a foot pedal for his drill press.

The first time I saw that though I thought I was seeing things.. It looked like he had 3 hands.

Rich Schneider
02-10-2008, 9:15 AM
I dunno if he sniffs wood or not, but from the few times I've met him and interacted with him through classes I've taken I can say he is a humble down to earth person. From what I recall he was raised on the east coast (Boston area), then moved to the west coast as a young guy. The drill press was a metal working drill press he bought used and is foot operated...pretty nifty. One of his former apprentices is known as the Wood Whisperer however...

Cliff Rohrabacher
02-10-2008, 9:57 AM
Norm beat him up and chased him to the west coast.

Jim Becker
02-10-2008, 10:30 AM
David is a very warm and engaging fellow. I had the pleasure to meet him a few years ago at the AAW symposium in Orlando.

John Hain
02-10-2008, 10:37 AM
I met David at last year's Vegas show. Great guy; very down to earth. Considering he was "royalty" as the show, he took time to speak with everyone who came up to him. I had the impression he still cannot believe so many people know him.

Gary Keedwell
02-10-2008, 10:43 AM
Norm beat him up and chased him to the west coast.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v196/evsac/Video/Laie_67.gif Sorry...I got a chuckle from that one.

Gary

Michael Gibbons
02-10-2008, 10:53 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v196/evsac/Video/Laie_67.gif Sorry...I got a chuckle from that one.

GaryLeave Bahstan, Dave, and don't return.

Carroll Courtney
02-10-2008, 10:58 AM
Joe,he has a foot operated drill press.He can use his foot or the hand to lower the quilt.

Art Mann
02-10-2008, 11:02 AM
I don't have the heart to tell her I sniff wood too.

You better be careful! Judging from some of the dust collection threads I have read, that practice is deadly. :eek:

Peter Quinn
02-10-2008, 11:24 AM
I wish DIY would film new edpisodes of his show and release the old ones on DVD. At one point I had the whole series on my DVR, DVR broke, I cried for days. He presents such a comprehansive array of advanced woodworking techniques over the course of the series its like a complete basic education. Each time I watch one of his shows, even the ones I have seen 10X, I pick up something new. No other national woodworking broadcast even comes close (sorry Norm). Don't actually care for much of the furniture made on the show but the inspiration he gives through making it is invaluable.


Found myself bidding on a 16" Northfield jointer once on e-bay after watching him skew some figured wood on his jointer, realized getting a 2400# machine down my steep bilco stairs would present a serious mechanical challenge! Next episode he used a card scraper and a smooth plane to do the same work, much easier to carry!

keith ouellette
02-10-2008, 11:26 AM
I like watching David Marks but most of the things he makes I find a little to exotic for my taste. Great show though.

Pat Germain
02-10-2008, 12:02 PM
I wouldn't say DJM's projects are impossible. Most of them are definitely challenging. Personally, I think he's great and I thoroughly enjoy his show. I think there are a total of 96 episodes that finished up in 2005. I haven't seen nearly all of them. I keep falling asleep when he's on at midnight (like last night). I'm seriously considering buying a DVR just to record Woodworks and New Yankee Workshop because I can rarely catch them and I learn so much from both shows.

I did catch an episode of Woodworks recently where David used his table saw to cut a cove. He clamped a wooden fence diagonally on his Uni-Saw. He then ran the stock over the top of the blade at a sharp angle. I literally sat up and took notice when I saw this. I could imagine a hundred people giving a hundred reasons why it shouldn't be done. But you know what? It worked beautifully!

The only woodworking style I'm not keen on is the "ultra-modern" look. Even some of those examples I can appreciate. I kinda like the exotic, Egyptian flare of David's designs. I'm scheduled to attend his inlay class this month. I'm really looking forward to it!

Toney Robertson
02-10-2008, 12:25 PM
I just finished watching DM build a cherry corner table. It had a solid wood top with an ebony inlay. A couple of things bothered me on that project.

First, with the ebony long grain going across the grain of the cherry, wouldn't that cause a problem with expansion and contraction? Wouldn't the ebony crack in the summer when the cherry expands?

Second, he used figure eights to secure the top. The long grain of the top was parallel to the front apron. He put figure eights on the 2 90 degree aprons which makes sense but he also put one on the front apron. It would appear to me that the expansion and contraction force would be totally opposed to that figure eight.

He is the expert but those things did make me wonder. Did anyone else see that episode? What did you think?

Toney

Fred Voorhees
02-10-2008, 12:36 PM
Second, he used figure eights to secure the top. The long grain of the top was parallel to the front apron. He put figure eights on the 2 90 degree aprons which makes sense but he also put one on the front apron. It would appear to me that the expansion and contraction force would be totally opposed to that figure eight.

He is the expert but those things did make me wonder. Did anyone else see that episode? What did you think?

Toney


Toney, I have wondered about this figure eight deal myself. I can see putting the fasteners on the sides of the table where the side to side expansion and contraction will make the figure eights move back and forth to the right and left, but to put them on the front and back aprons confounds me. In my way of thinking, the expansion and contraction are in direct conflict with the action of the figure eights. The only way I would think that they might possibly work in that configuration would be to install them so that they ARE NOT at a 90 degree angle to the aprons so that they MIGHT move with the expansion and contraction. I would love to hear anyones explanation of how I am wrong in this thinking.

Pat Germain
02-10-2008, 12:36 PM
Shoot! That's the where episode I fell asleep.

Isn't an inlay similar to a veneer and thus would have minimal movement? Dollars to doughnuts, David knew what he was doing. He has learned the hard way.

I saw an interview with him where he described some clocks he made in his younger years. He had a contract to sell them to a department store. The order was suddenlty cancelled because the clocks broke. He had framed a solid, square clock face with hardwood. Of course it broke, but he didn't know why back then. He sought the advice of an old timer who explained how the wood moved. His reaction was, "Wood moves?" :D

For anyone with an interest in David Marks' show or projects, I highly recommend viewing this interview. It's on the Wood Whisperer web site. Funny, in the interview he doesn't speak at all like he does on Woodworks. I get the impression he had a kind of nervous speach habit while he was doing that show.

Mark Singer
02-10-2008, 12:53 PM
David,
Is a super talented woodworker! He is very diverse in his talents, turning, exotic finishes, and fine furniture. He uses a practical approach with new and traditional techniques and without compromising the final work. I attended a design seminar he gave with my son , Ryan a few years ago. David is a an outstanding person , really down to earth.

Ken Fitzgerald
02-10-2008, 1:13 PM
I was able to watch David Marks shows for about 3 months before DIY pulled them ( I still haven't forgiven DIY). David Marks is in my opinion a very talented woodworker. He and Norm have different styles, both are excellent IMHO.

Ben Rafael
02-10-2008, 1:25 PM
Toney, I have wondered about this figure eight deal myself. I can see putting the fasteners on the sides of the table where the side to side expansion and contraction will make the figure eights move back and forth to the right and left, but to put them on the front and back aprons confounds me. In my way of thinking, the expansion and contraction are in direct conflict with the action of the figure eights. The only way I would think that they might possibly work in that configuration would be to install them so that they ARE NOT at a 90 degree angle to the aprons so that they MIGHT move with the expansion and contraction. I would love to hear anyones explanation of how I am wrong in this thinking.

He lives and works in California, wood doesn't move out here. Not much at least.
I have stuff in my home that should've exploded, but years later there are no gaps, nothing that would signify wood movement.
California is great: Beautiful weather, beautiful women, no wood movement. What else do you need in life.

Jack Vines
02-10-2008, 1:49 PM
http://www.djmarks.com/woodworks.asp

Jeffrey Makiel
02-10-2008, 2:29 PM
I was able to watch David Marks shows for about 3 months before DIY pulled them ( I still haven't forgiven DIY). David Marks is in my opinion a very talented woodworker. He and Norm have different styles, both are excellent IMHO.

Ken, his show is still on DIY on Friday and Saturday evenings with the New Yankee Workshop reruns. However, the shows are repeats if that's what you mean.
-Jeff :)

Pat Germain
02-10-2008, 2:56 PM
I'll bet Woodworks is among the most popular shows on DIY. Maybe they haven't realeased Woodworks on DVD because they're afraid people will stop watching it on DIY.

I'm pretty sure I've seen DIY promos which have mentioned NYW is the most popular show on DIY.

Ben Rafael
02-10-2008, 3:47 PM
They haven't released it on DVD because either there is some kind of dispute(contractual or otherwise) or the management of DIY(or whoever owns the rights) is incompetent.
I do not have cable TV and never will, I would gladly buy some or all of the episodes on a DVD, I am certainly not the only one. Someone is dropping the ball on a moneymaker.

Mark Singer
02-10-2008, 4:12 PM
The figure eight fasteners allow movement so the wood can expand without transferring or being constrained by other components. So if one part moves more than another it does not matter, the figure eights will rotate. You should position them at an angle to the top so it can move either way

Keith Spaniel
02-10-2008, 4:14 PM
He presents such a comprehansive array of advanced woodworking techniques over the course of the series its like a complete basic education. Each time I watch one of his shows, even the ones I have seen 10X, I pick up something new. No other national woodworking broadcast even comes close (sorry Norm). Don't actually care for much of the furniture made on the show but the inspiration he gives through making it is invaluable.

I must agree with that quote. I almost think that I could do one of those projects, than he goes to the vacume press or the horizonal boring machine and its all over for me. Would like to see a tour of D.M. shop . Yea thats all I need to catch up with him is all his tools and 50 more years.
I think Norm could build anything, but DM is more artsy and uses the exotic woods and.... keith

Pat Germain
02-10-2008, 5:06 PM
They haven't released it on DVD because either there is some kind of dispute(contractual or otherwise) or the management of DIY(or whoever owns the rights) is incompetent.
I do not have cable TV and never will, I would gladly buy some or all of the episodes on a DVD, I am certainly not the only one. Someone is dropping the ball on a moneymaker.

I still think it's because DIY doesn't want to lose viewers.

I'll ask David about this when I see him in two weeks. I'm sure it's a very common question. In fact, it's part of the FAQ on his web site. The answer there is vague stating only that the shows haven't been released on DVD. No reason is provided.

David was recruited to do the show. I expect the producers own and control the Woodworks shows and David has nothing to do with it.

Phil Thien
02-10-2008, 5:53 PM
Has anyone else noticed that he seems to use ordinary twist bits rather than brad-point bits?

Joe Petersen
02-10-2008, 6:28 PM
I have the DVR set to record all of Woodworks and NYW. Sometimes I get to watch before .the kids delete them. Most are repeats even for a latecomer to the show such as myself. Plus the DVR deletes the oldest when it reaches 5 episodes.

I have never seen a foot pedal quill control. I assumed it was an assiatant off-screen. Now that I think of it I do remember and auto down stroke in a Shopnotes once.

The most amazing piece I have seen made was the "Turtle Toybox". Interesting that the Wood Wisperer was his apprentice. Make sense I guess.

Pat Germain
02-10-2008, 7:05 PM
The turtle toybox is one of the few DJM projects I didn't like. I think that thing would scare a lot of kids. :eek:

Marc Spagnuolo, aka The Wood Whisperer, has mentioned a lot of his internship with David dealt with things not directly woodworking. He said David asked him a lot of questions about what he wanted out of life and about his goals. Apparently, David Marks is a very spiritual person. His last newsletter featured a picture of him atop a mountain in New Zealand playing a drum; very "guru" like.

Al Willits
02-10-2008, 7:39 PM
I enjoyed the 2 day seminar he gave last year here in Mpls, got to talk to him briefly and he definitely is much more personable in real life.

I'd love to get his programs, had a friend who was supposed to copy the ones he had but his DVD collection got stolen, along with his HT system.

Al

Mike Langford
02-10-2008, 8:31 PM
Has anyone else noticed that he seems to use ordinary twist bits rather than brad-point bits?

You also don't see any of them expensive newfangled parallel clamps in his shop........just bar and pipe clamps! :D

Al Willits
02-10-2008, 9:58 PM
You also don't see any of them expensive newfangled parallel clamps in his shop........just bar and pipe clamps! :D


Doesn't appear to be much festool or sawstop either....:D


I'm betting he started with the older stuff and see's no reason to change..maybe?

Al

Scott Rathburn
02-10-2008, 11:00 PM
I'm a little late on this thread, but someone asked in the beginning where David was from. I've taken several classes with him and he is originally from New Jersey. Also a great instructor and very down to earth guy.

George Bowen
02-10-2008, 11:09 PM
The turtle toybox is one of the few DJM projects I didn't like. I think that thing would scare a lot of kids. :eek:

Marc Spagnuolo, aka The Wood Whisperer, has mentioned a lot of his internship with David dealt with things not directly woodworking. He said David asked him a lot of questions about what he wanted out of life and about his goals. Apparently, David Marks is a very spiritual person. His last newsletter featured a picture of him atop a mountain in New Zealand playing a drum; very "guru" like.

I enjoyed the drum table episode.

He is truley an artist at heart, and simply expresses through wood, which is a beautiful medium, and quite functional.

Toney Robertson
02-10-2008, 11:38 PM
The figure eight fasteners allow movement so the wood can expand without transferring or being constrained by other components. So if one part moves more than another it does not matter, the figure eights will rotate. You should position them at an angle to the top so it can move either way

IMO that's the problem with how DM positioned them on this particular project.

The grain was running parallel to the front apron. He installed a figure eight on top of that apron component so the expansion and contraction of the top would be at 90d to the front apron and therefore straight in line with the figure eight. It would appear to me that as the top would change it would bow the front apron since the figure eight would not be able to pivot.

Obviously I must be missing something.

Toney

Pat Germain
02-11-2008, 12:34 AM
^^ Here, here!

john dennis
02-11-2008, 12:40 AM
I had a third hand once... scared me to death!!! Now I miss it.

Pat Germain
02-11-2008, 12:46 AM
Doesn't appear to be much festool or sawstop either....:D

I'm betting he started with the older stuff and see's no reason to change..maybe?

Al

David does use some Festool power tools on Woodworks. But most of his stationary tools are indeed old, big-iron. (His giant lathe may be new.)

Now if I could just figure out what that thing is in the triangle shaped cage against the wall... A heater, maybe?

You know, I recall one Woodworks episode where David made some small, hollow vases. On that particular episode, he seemed a lot more relaxed and personable than other episodes. Maybe it was one of the later ones. It seems that persona is more true his nature.

Alan Tolchinsky
02-11-2008, 12:48 AM
just tell from his shows what a nice person he is. And that's backed up from what others who have met him personally have said.

Jason Koon
02-11-2008, 9:19 AM
Doesn't appear to be much festool or sawstop either....:D


I've seen him using the festool dust collectors attached to his biscuit jointer.. I may be mistaken but I believe I've seen him use a festool sander and/or driver too.

Matt Meiser
02-11-2008, 9:35 AM
Now if I could just figure out what that thing is in the triangle shaped cage against the wall... A heater, maybe?

IIRC it is a vent fan. I seem to remember it being featured in one of the workshop books in a chapter about his shop (before he became famous.)

Bill White
02-11-2008, 11:28 AM
Hair coloring like a certain woodworker on tv.

If he finished his WWing projects like his head........

I enjoy the show too.
Bill

Chris Padilla
02-11-2008, 11:55 AM
I've been capturing all his repeats on DIY and recording them to DVD but for whatever reason, there are some episodes that DIY are simply not repeating but I keep hoping they'll show up one day.

I may have to shoot DIY an email and ask them why they aren't repeating some episodes....

Jason Scott
02-11-2008, 12:48 PM
I had a third hand once... scared me to death!!! Now I miss it.
LOLOLOLOL:D:D

Greg Robbins
02-11-2008, 1:34 PM
I did catch an episode of Woodworks recently where David used his table saw to cut a cove. He clamped a wooden fence diagonally on his Uni-Saw. He then ran the stock over the top of the blade at a sharp angle. I literally sat up and took notice when I saw this. I could imagine a hundred people giving a hundred reasons why it shouldn't be done. But you know what? It worked beautifully!

This is a standard method of making coves.