Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 21

Thread: installing 7/16" OSB on ceiling, ok to cut into 4'x4' squares?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Topeka, Kansas
    Posts
    311

    installing 7/16" OSB on ceiling, ok to cut into 4'x4' squares?

    in the process of installing 7/16" OSB on my shop ceiling by myself and the 4x8 sheets are a bit unruly to handle. i was wondering if there would be any negatives (besides visual which i am ok with) to cutting the sheets in half and installing them as 4'x4' squares? i have 24" OC joists

    i think this would really help me get this done faster (and safer) having a 4x8 sheet of OSB fall on your head kind of hurts!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Mid Michigan
    Posts
    3,514
    Rent a sheet lifting dolly (can't remember the correct name)even if you do 4x4 sheets, it will be a back saver and will cut the installation time in half. The 4x8 sheets may help strengthen the ceiling if they are offset so the seams don't line up.
    David B

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    West of Ft. Worth, TX
    Posts
    5,799
    In my shop, I mounted the florescent lights between and recessed into the ceiling joists. Made my own reflectors out of white glassliner material. So I cut my sheets into 2 X 8 sections. Used a ladder to hold one end up, then a dead man to hold the other into place and started screwing it down. It was a little tricky, but it worked. Not sure I'd want to do 4 X 8s that way though.
    The drywall lift that David is referring to would be the safest way to do it. Other than that, nothing wrong with using 4 X 4 sections. Jim.
    Coolmeadow Setters...Exclusively Irish! When Irish Eyes are smiling....They're usually up to something!!
    Home of Irish Setter Rescue of North Texas.
    No, I'm not an electrician. Any information I share is purely what I would do myself. If in doubt, hire an electrician!
    Member of the G0691 fan club!
    At a minimum, I'm Pentatoxic...Most likely I'm a Pentaholic. There seems to be no known cure. Pentatonix, winners of The Sing Off, s3.

  4. #4
    I made four fingers with stand-offs that I mounted to each side of where the sheet was going to go. I would slide the sheet under two of the fingers on one side of where the sheet was going to go, push the other side up with one hand, and turn the finger to hold the other side of the sheet up. I was able to move the sheet around and get it tight before I put in the screws. I also glued OSB scraps over the seams from the top to keep the heated air from escaping into the Attic space before I blue in the insulation. A sheet rock lift would be better if you have room to maneuver which I did not. I think that I would put 5/8 12 foot sheet rock on the ceiling if I had to do it over again.
    Scott

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    2,964
    Before lifts, or back when I was young enough to want to do that work I hung a lot of drywall ceilings with T props. You make a 2x4, the top being about 3', the leg to the floor being slightly more than the distance to the ceiling joist overall, leg and T. Make two. Lean one against the wall to start and the other out of the sheets path but where you can grab it. Stick the end of the sheet on the one on the wall, raise the other end, grab the other prop and pull it into place so it is supporting the sheet. Not too tight just yet, you need to first snug up the one at the wall and get the sheet positioned perfectly. Then give the legs of the prop a kick to tighten them up.

    Worked for me and I was hanging 16" sheets back then.....

    Now I can't even pick up a 16' sheet, and I have a lift......

  6. #6
    I wonder how it would work to make a jig by screwing up a 2x at the end of the pc just installed leaving a gap to slide the end of the next pc under to hold that end while you lifted the other end into placed and secured it - ??

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Evanston, In
    Posts
    239
    I did mine couple weeekends ago. Had the daughter and her boyfriend hold the sheets up. Figured it was better than watching them lay on the floor and watch TV.

    You can cut them into 4x4 pieces. Make sure you nail/ screw them up good. I was going to do it that way, until I volunteered my helpers.

  8. #8
    couple things to think about. First, for strength, you want to stager your joints. If you cut the sheets in half, then start with a 2' piece then run your 4 footers. One option for running the 8 footers is to screw a piece of wood to the end of each sheet, then slide the next sheet up and allow the added piece of wood to suport the end of your sheet so you can handle it easier. I also will start a few screws in the sheet so I only need to support with one hand while operating the gun with the other. Since it is OSB you could snap lines on the sheets and use a nail gun.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Topeka, Kansas
    Posts
    311
    when you guys mention strength what exactly are you referring too? currently the garage has no ceiling just open rafters


    what i ended up doing on the one sheet i put up is made a dead man thing out of 2x4s and propped it against the wall then slid the end of the sheet on top of it and raised the other end. i used my 1/4" crown stapler (a $14 harbor freight gem) to tack the sheet in place and then once it was holding i secured it with screws. this worked but by this point i was so drained i gave up for the night and called it quits. i didnt go out there today though cause i had some other stuff to do. will likely work some more on it tomorrow and give the 1/2 sheet thing a try and see how it goes

  10. Quote Originally Posted by Steve Southwood View Post
    I did mine couple weeekends ago. Had the daughter and her boyfriend hold the sheets up. Figured it was better than watching them lay on the floor and watch TV.

    You can cut them into 4x4 pieces. Make sure you nail/ screw them up good. I was going to do it that way, until I volunteered my helpers.
    Had the exact same problem and I find that kind of laziness irritating as well. Used the bandsaw and nail gun on the boyfriend but just sent my daughter to her room.

  11. Using the "T" supports like Larry and others mentioned are the key to doing it yourself if you don't have a lift. I would add to that by screwing a cleat to the wall to slide one end in, then use the T to support the other.

    One thing to consider besides staggering the joints if you decide to go with 4x4 panels is how easily 7/16 OSB will blow out screwing into the edges. I am a bit of a perfectionist....but I HATE 7/16" OSB for that reason.....ends up looking like a warzone unless you countersink all the edge screws. You could always run some pine 1x2's over the joints...or just live with it.

    Just curious why you decided on the OSB for the ceiling VS drywall?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Topeka, Kansas
    Posts
    311
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Stricker View Post

    Just curious why you decided on the OSB for the ceiling VS drywall?
    was cheaper!

  13. #13
    Mike... I did the entire interior of my 20x28 shop with the 7/16 OSB. I ran into the same problem as yours when it came time to do the ceiling. Take the previous advise and go rent a drywall jack. I rented one on a Saturday and it didn't have to be back until Monday and it was a one day rental... $30. I too tried the "t" bar method and gave up after two sheets. At the time I did my shop, the OSB didn't cost that much more than drywall... and with OSB, I could mount nearly anything, anywhere... and I didn't have to worry about knocking a hole in the wall if I accidently forgot how close to the wall I was while turning a board or something...

    We sold the house I built that shop at and now I have a 25x80 shop that is all brick covered with stucco... talk about creating problems for mounting stuff to walls!!!

    Bill (in OK)

  14. #14
    Here's another thing I found that may interest you. If you plan on putting a batten strip over the joints for some reason the pressure treated lattice found in the local HD was like .80/strip where as the finished stuff was a couple dollars.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Topeka, Kansas
    Posts
    311
    this is probably a dumb question but how do i go about cutting holes for the outlets? i have a spiral saw that cuts drywall but it wont work on the osb.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •