Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 33

Thread: Jet 1642 VS NOVA 1624-44 Wood Lathe

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Ithaca, New York
    Posts
    202

    Jet 1642 VS NOVA 1624-44 Wood Lathe

    Just considering picking something up to work with. I am a total beginner, but I like getting quality, middle of the road priced equipment. I am curious about the pros and cons of each. Any input from you folks between the two of them would be greatly appreciated. Opinions are welcome.

  2. #2
    Rick:
    I don't think you will go wrong with either of these lathes. It is a matter for you to decide on cost , shop space, and what you intend to do. I have the Nova and I really like it. I've had some problems but Teknatool and Craft Supply (retailer) have been great to fix the problems. It is less expensive than the Jet but does not have variable speed. You must change the belt to different pulleys.
    Both are very capable lathes and I think you will be happy with either. Tell us more what you plan to do with the lathes and many others will comment.

    All the best.

    Don

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Ithaca, New York
    Posts
    202
    Not even really sure really. Turning bowls, banjo rims, chair parts ect. Really though I am curious...how often do you need more than 24" of length? Even when doing chair legs?

  4. #4
    Rick - like Don said - it really depends on what you want to turn. I have the Jet 1642 EVS and I use the entire length of the bed more times than not because I turn mostly hollow forms and use a captured system - which takes up a lot of room.
    Steve

    “You never know what you got til it's gone!”
    Please don’t let that happen!
    Become a financial Contributor today!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    torrance, Ca
    Posts
    2,071
    keep in mind with the nova you will probably have to make a stand. Just a thought.

  6. #6
    Actually the Nova 1624-44 comes with a good stand - cast iron top sections and heavy steel tube legs with leveling feet.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kapolei Hawaii
    Posts
    2,196
    I think either of these two lathes is NOT middle of the road. They both are solid lathes, and should be servicable for a good long while. To me, the Minis or Midis are more middle of the road stuff. You should not to have to upgrade to anything, unless you really get into turning. I would like to move UP to either of those lathes.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Ithaca, New York
    Posts
    202
    That is a question...does the Nova tend to 'walk' more than the Jet? Seems like the stand on the Nova is a bit less sturdy than the Jet.....

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Eureka, Mo.
    Posts
    2,363
    I've spoken with a number of folks who own that Nova and never a bad word about it. As far as walking around with a big off balance piece just put some bags of sand under it and that will help a bunch. I have a jet 1442 and would take the 1642 over the Nova anytime. The VS and mass of the Jet bring that machine real close to top of the line. Not and 800 pound $6K monster machine but it is a "wannabe" for that class. Either will serve you quite well...Bill...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Detroit, MI
    Posts
    1,593
    I have the Jet 1642 and absolutely recommend it very highly. It's a solid performer at a good price. I think it is a nicer machine than the Nova. Variable speed is not optional in my opinion, and I wouldn't consider a lathe without it. I would opt for the 2HP motor if you can afford it. That said, you can get by quite well with the Nova too.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    New Port Richey, FL
    Posts
    197
    take it from me, ive owned both of the lathes.

    i started with the nova, and it is awesome, but the jet is much beefier, longer bed, seems to run quieter, and the most important thing..... VS

    the nova is great like i said, but a couple months on it and you'll want a little beefier machine, at least i did, now a bonus to the nova is the outboard tool rest, i turned an18 inch bowl on my nova, cant do that on the jet without an standalone tool rest. anyways, my vote is the Jet. pm me with any specific questions.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Benton City, WA
    Posts
    1,465
    I have the Nova because at the time the VS wasn't worth the extra money to me. And it still isn't. However if money is easier for you to come by, go with the VS. Changing belts isn't bad but it would be nice to not have to. The Nova Is a great lathe and I'm sure the Jet is also.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Wimberley, Texas
    Posts
    2,828
    Rick,
    As a beginner, electronic variable speed would be your best friend, enabling you to turn at modest and controlled speeds while you learn. As you work your way up the learning curve, your turning speed will increase and EVS will help that happen as gradually or as fast as you need it to.

    A great feature of a 42" bed (am I the only one who has noticed this?) is that you will not be whacking your elbow on the tailstock all the time. My right elbow has permanent divots from the tailstock of my previous (36" bed) lathe.

    And finally, a year from now you will never miss the extra $$, and you will have had the pleasure of using a 1642EVS for a year. For ref. have never seen a Nova, but am sure it is a fine machine also, as many owners have praised it highly.
    Richard in Wimberley

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    torrance, Ca
    Posts
    2,071
    true, it does come with a stand, it just never seemed as sturdy as the one that the jet comes with. You would definitely have to modify it to add a ballast. Modding the Jet for a ballast will be much easier also. My vote is the jet.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Madison View Post
    As a beginner, electronic variable speed would be your best friend, enabling you to turn at modest and controlled speeds while you learn. As you work your way up the learning curve, your turning speed will increase and EVS will help that happen as gradually or as fast as you need it to.
    I have to agree with Richard on his recommendation of EVS. A lot of folks will tell you that it is no big deal to change the belts to regulate speed - and they are right, it is no big deal and it doesn't take very long. The one major advantage that EVS has over fixed speed lathes is that you can adjust the speed a few rpms and eliminate any vibration problems you may experience. You can not do that with a belt drive lathe. Now that I have been using an EVS system for a little over 2 years - I believe it is that ability to eliminate vibration which makes the EVS so important!
    Steve

    “You never know what you got til it's gone!”
    Please don’t let that happen!
    Become a financial Contributor today!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •