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Thread: Delta Scrollsaw. Is this worth picking up?

  1. #1
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    Delta Scrollsaw. Is this worth picking up?

    I have been on the lookout for a used scrollsaw. I don't see using it much but would like to include some marquetry on some upcoming projects. I've found a used Delta 15" for $75. I believe it's a model Model#40-150 and was made in '89. I don't know much about scrollsaws so I guess what I would like to know is if this would be OK for occasional use or would I regret the purchase.

  2. #2
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    I do not if your scroll saw is the same as the older model that has the chrome plated cylinder at the top of the blade. If so,beware the pot metal internal part that a cam runs inside of to make the blade go up and dow. Delta several years ago wanted $215.00 for this junky part. They call them 'Historic Parts". That part frequently fails. I let a young man make one out of steel in my shop. It wasn't hard to make,and is infinitely superior to the original.

    Maybe yours is the newer "walking beam" type of action,which is quite a different machine.If so,any of the walking beam type saws have a flaw: the blade goes backwards and forwards a little bit as well as up and dow. It bothers me,because I tend to do small work,and the blade files the side of the cut,enlarging the kerf. At least the old style machines had a true straight up and down motion.

    I have an expensive Hegner German scroll saw. Cost $1200.00 in the 80's. I got it so cheap that I couldn't say no. But,it also has the walking beam action. I don't know of a recent model that doesn't have the same action.
    Last edited by george wilson; 03-12-2009 at 9:57 PM.

  3. #3
    I picked this one up for $40.00 at a yard sale more than a year ago and have used it a lot since then:

    http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?t=77241

    Pics of the saw are at the bottom of the thread. Having used it for more than a year now, knowing what I now know about it, I would have paid $150-200 for it. That may sound foolish when you can get a new one for about the same price. But, it ain't the same saw!

    If the one that you're considering buying is like this one, my two cents says go for it.
    Stephen Edwards
    Hilham, TN 38568

    "Build for the joy of it!"

  4. #4
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    Ok John... the key here is you say you are wanting to use it for marquetry.

    Truth be known...not a good saw for marquetry.

    The Henger that has been posted above is a great saw but not cheap $1,200 is a lot. Especially these days.

    Download a program called SNARFER and set it up to search CL for a Dewalt 788. The action on this saw was modeled after an Excalibur and has the blade action you need to do marquetry and has a 20" throat providing the clearance needed for larger marquetry pieces. You won’t be disappointed. With scroll saws...just get a good model rather than trying to bargain shop for a low quality (I guess it will do) type saw. It will not pay off in the long run even for "occasional use".

    Folks have been finding this saw for 300-400 bucks easy here of late!
    Dewey

    "Everything is better with Inlay or Marquetry!"


  5. #5
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    Thanks for the input guys. Guess I'll pass on this one.

    Stephen, this is a 40-150 not a 40-601 like you got. Thanks for the input though, if I see a 40-601 I will jump on it.

  6. #6
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    South Windsor, CT
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    Another option to consider is a jigsaw. Jigsaws will be older, but because of that you may be able to find one inexpensively.

    The difference between a scroll saw and a jig saw is that the arm on a jigsaw is fixed. The motor is under the table. The blade moves straight up and down unlike a scroll saw where the blade actually travels in an arc. You can actually do a tighter curve on a jigsaw because of the way the blade moves, although scroll saws typically cut faster.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Bob and Dewey,exactly what I was trying to explain. The saw goes back and forth as well as up and down,and it abrades the saw cut,making it wider. I got my Hegner so cheap that I couldn't turn it down. It runs very smooth,and has variable speed,and is good for some purposes,but not for very fine scroll work. However,it is a real pain to change the blades on.The Delta type is much better on blade changes.I need to someday make better blade chucks for the Hegner,or get rid of it and fix up a proper jigsaw.

    I have some machines called die filers. They work like jigsaws,but propel files straight up and down,for filing dies in metal. I have 3,and modified 1 to serve as a jigsaw. I can make the blade go straight up and down,and have installed variable speed so I can get it to saw like a hand powered jeweler's saw,or fret saw.

    I'd use a jeweler's saw,or fret saw like I used to,but neck surgery has resulted in constant pain,so I prefer to not have to remain in that posture. I really feel that hand sawing of scroll work is the most accurately controllable way to go.

    If someone could get the old model Delta,Powermatic,or Walker Turner jig saw,they have true up and down motion. The Delta has weak pot metal parts,though,as I said.And,they want ridiculous prices for their"historic" parts.I don't know what metals the other 2 saws used internally. I used to own a nice Walker turner,and it was a better saw than the Delta.
    Last edited by george wilson; 03-13-2009 at 8:46 AM.

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