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Thread: My "timber frame" mobile base!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles, Calif.
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    2,007

    My "timber frame" mobile base!

    Having looked all over for a suitable mobile base for my new Grizzly cabinet saw, I decided to make my own out of hardwood. I did this for a couple of reasons. First, I'm about 6'5" tall, so I wanted to get the table height up to 40" without the saw getting too tippy. Also, I wanted something beefy and attractive and thought this might be a good opportunity for me to practice a number of woodworking techniques that I'd not attempted before.

    The four main parts are made of red oak. I used mortise and "stub-tenon" joinery, with bench bolts purchased from Lee Valley. I made the mortises on the drill press with a forstner bit and cleaned them up with a chisel. The stub tenons I made on the tablesaw with a stacked dado. The combination of the M&T joints with the bench bolts is probably overkill, but this thing is solid as a rock.

    I also used 4" double-locking urethane casters from Woodcraft and the angled steel I found at Home Depot in the "Simpson Strong-Tie" rack. They're very thick and were about $10 each. I couldn't believe how pricey they were, but they're perfect! I did have to drill some smaller holes in them for lag screws, however. Each one sits in a small recess created with the dado stack.

    For the finish, I just sprayed 3 thin coats of Cabot spray varnish. Nice and easy, but it did take several days to fully dry.

    Now if I can just figure out how to get my saw onto the base!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Jason, that looks really nice and has given me some ideas for a few pieces of my own equipment. Thanks for posting
    Grant
    GO Buckeyes!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Albuquerque, New Mexico
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    That looks great Jason.
    I'm 6'3 and sometimes wish my TS was a little higher.
    82.7% of all statistics are made up on the spot. -- Steven Wright

    Please help support the Creek.


  4. #4
    Excellent solution...looks great and you know it will last. Fine job!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    It makes a big difference on my back!

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Page View Post
    That looks great Jason.
    I'm 6'3 and sometimes wish my TS was a little higher.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles, Calif.
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    Thanks! I'll post a picture of my saw on the base when I figure out how to get it on there.



    Quote Originally Posted by Grant Davis View Post
    Jason, that looks really nice and has given me some ideas for a few pieces of my own equipment. Thanks for posting

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Kanasas City, MO
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Page View Post
    That looks great Jason.
    I'm 6'3 and sometimes wish my TS was a little higher.
    +1 to that.
    I put a "lift kit" under my jointer as the bending down is a pain in the back.
    That's pretty nice Jason.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Eddington, ME
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    538
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason White View Post

    Now if I can just figure out how to get my saw onto the base!
    A folding 2 ton engine hoist / shop crane is a back saver. Can be had for less than $200 from multiple places. Get the folding one as it takes up little room, and fits through normal doors when folded.

    I unloaded a 450# boiler by myself 2 days ago. I used it to move all my heavy items when we got our new house 2 years ago. It has paid for itself many times over since I have had it.

  9. #9
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    Nov 2006
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    Can you please post a picture of your lift kit? I've often wish my jointer was a bit higher, too.

    Jason

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Cole View Post
    +1 to that.
    I put a "lift kit" under my jointer as the bending down is a pain in the back.
    That's pretty nice Jason.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Western Nebraska
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    2,945
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Cole View Post
    +1 to that.
    I put a "lift kit" under my jointer as the bending down is a pain in the back.
    That's pretty nice Jason.

    6' 4" here, and plus one more on the lift. I have 2" of shims and blocks under my Felder combo to get it up where it should be. Jason, your solution is WAY more elegant.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Vermilion,OH
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    205
    Jason,

    I embarrassed to say that looks nicer than some of my furniture projects.

    Joe

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles, Calif.
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    Mine, too.

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Von Kaenel View Post
    Jason,

    I embarrassed to say that looks nicer than some of my furniture projects.

    Joe

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason White View Post
    Can you please post a picture of your lift kit? I've often wish my jointer was a bit higher, too.
    Jason
    Here was my idea for raising my planer up 5" higher. I raised it so the boards I ran though it went over top of my table saw not into the side of it. I'm considering doing this same setup to my jointer. The boards I run though through my jointer run into the side of my router table. It'd be nice to have them at the same height.

    http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?t=108341
    If a brad nailer shoots brads, and a pin nailer shoots pins, a framing nailer must shoot framers ... right?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Belden, Mississippi
    Posts
    2,285
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason White View Post
    Having looked all over for a suitable mobile base for my new Grizzly cabinet saw, I decided to make my own out of hardwood. I did this for a couple of reasons. First, I'm about 6'5" tall, so I wanted to get the table height up to 40" without the saw getting too tippy. Also, I wanted something beefy and attractive and thought this might be a good opportunity for me to practice a number of woodworking techniques that I'd not attempted before.

    The four main parts are made of red oak. I used mortise and "stub-tenon" joinery, with bench bolts purchased from Lee Valley. I made the mortises on the drill press with a forstner bit and cleaned them up with a chisel. The stub tenons I made on the tablesaw with a stacked dado. The combination of the M&T joints with the bench bolts is probably overkill, but this thing is solid as a rock.

    I also used 4" double-locking urethane casters from Woodcraft and the angled steel I found at Home Depot in the "Simpson Strong-Tie" rack. They're very thick and were about $10 each. I couldn't believe how pricey they were, but they're perfect! I did have to drill some smaller holes in them for lag screws, however. Each one sits in a small recess created with the dado stack.

    For the finish, I just sprayed 3 thin coats of Cabot spray varnish. Nice and easy, but it did take several days to fully dry.

    Now if I can just figure out how to get my saw onto the base!
    Mr. White, looks like that puppy will hold a Abrams. What did ya end up spendin' on that bad boy?
    Bill
    On the other hand, I still have five fingers.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Atlanta , Ga.
    Posts
    3,970
    Excellent idea and execution, Jason.

    Sarge..

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