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Thread: PM66 Replaceable-insert Throat Plates

  1. #1
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    PM66 Replaceable-insert Throat Plates

    Good evening, folks.

    I'm sure many of you remember the Wood Dynamics throat plates before the company went out of business:

    http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?t=4833

    I've been toying with the idea of having a few milled by a machine shop to fit a PM66, as this would feasibly be the first and last throat plate you'd ever need. Bruce Page was kind enough to send me the AutoCAD drawing he created for a similar throat plate for his Unisaw. I used this as a guide and designed one to fit PM66s. The rough rendering is attached below.

    Obviously, higher quantity drives the price-per-unit lower, so I'd like to gauge interest from PM66 owners. If I could hit close to the original price point (let's say $125 with a couple of inserts), how many of you would be interested in one? The price for milling only one unit is close to $300, so you can tell why I'd like to make this a group buy

    Just reply to this post and I'll tally the replies in a week or so. I'll then update you all with an estimated cost based on the interest.

    Take care!

    Zayd
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  2. #2
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    Already been done..http://www.woodcentral.com/articles/...cles_893.shtml
    Working non-ferrous is within most woodworkers grasp. Not for the timid or beginner but it's certainly practical. I've been doing it for years as a Metalsmith. There was an article a few years back in one of the hobby mags of cobbling a similar insert out of wood that used replacable dovetailed inserts. There's lots of options for the informed and imaginative person out there and no need to wait on or rely on a machine shop or others for such devices.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Lizek View Post
    Already been done..http://www.woodcentral.com/articles/...cles_893.shtml
    Working non-ferrous is within most woodworkers grasp. Not for the timid or beginner but it's certainly practical. I've been doing it for years as a Metalsmith. There was an article a few years back in one of the hobby mags of cobbling a similar insert out of wood that used replacable dovetailed inserts. There's lots of options for the informed and imaginative person out there and no need to wait on or rely on a machine shop or others for such devices.
    Interesting info, Rick. Thanks for the link.

    While I'd consider myself someone inventive and while I've done a substantial amount of metalwork in my past, there are some endeavors where I'd rather not invest the time. Rather than machine a less-than-perfect one-off for myself, I'd much rather explore an option where I can pay someone else a fair payment to do the work for me... and whoever else would be interested.

  4. #4
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    I'm making one right now for MY Ridgid out of Corian. If you want one out of aluminum, Infinity has them for 79.90 for several different saw models. Inserts screw in and are 9.95 each, or I'm sure you could make your own using the original as a pattern. Here's the web page: http://www.infinitytools.com/products.asp?dept=1400 When I saw the piece, I changed my inserts to screw in instead of dovetailed like the sites above show. I think it will be easier to make new inserts for. I have the template for the inserts, and the recess cuts already made. I have a working unit that has an extra 1/8" hole in it where I drilled the back tie down hole in the wrong end. But it could be made to be used.
    It's been fun building it. And I think Corian is easier to route than the aluminum would be. Jim.

    Edit: I think they give SMC a 10% discount. Put SMC 10 in the comment section and it will be credited before it's charged out and shipped.
    Last edited by Jim O'Dell; 05-05-2009 at 1:24 PM. Reason: ADDED EDIT
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  5. #5
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    I have the one Jim has a link to. I like it. I thought about making one with a dovetail but thought the inserts would be harder to make and might rattle if you couldn't walk that fine line between too tight and too loose.

  6. #6
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    My thoughts exactly on the dovetail. I built my first one in Corian with the Dovetail way, and when I saw the Infinity unit, that's why I changed my design. Glad you like your Infinity unit. Good company to work with.
    Jim.
    Coolmeadow Setters...Exclusively Irish! When Irish Eyes are smiling....They're usually up to something!!
    Home of Irish Setter Rescue of North Texas.
    No, I'm not an electrician. Any information I share is purely what I would do myself. If in doubt, hire an electrician!
    Member of the G0691 fan club!
    At a minimum, I'm Pentatoxic...Most likely I'm a Pentaholic. There seems to be no known cure. Pentatonix, winners of The Sing Off, s3.

  7. #7
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    The wooden inserts are very easy to make with common woodshop tools belt sander or BS for the ends, a planer and TS. Once you have them set up you could make these by the boatload. Youll notice 3 small tapped holes (4-40 unc) in my throat plate. I drilled & tapped them for set screws just in case the wooden insert rattled. I have never needed to use them, the inserts slide in nice & firm with no play.
    Zayd, the only critique I would offer is to ditch the finger hole in favor of the 1/4-20 tapped hole in my drawing (seen near the top of the plate in the pic). I simply use a screw to lift out the plate & reinstall. Every OEM plate that Ive had had that finger hole and its just another place for the sawdust to fly out of.. JMHO
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Page View Post
    Zayd, the only critique I would offer is to ditch the finger hole in favor of the 1/4-20 tapped hole in my drawing (seen near the top of the plate in the pic). I simply use a screw to lift out the plate & reinstall. Every OEM plate that Ive had had that finger hole and its just another place for the sawdust to fly out of.. JMHO
    Good advice, Bruce. Good dust collection certainly takes precedence over convenience.

    Do you happen to remember what you paid to have yours milled? Both shops I've asked have come back with quotes near $300.

    Thanks!

    Zayd

  9. #9
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    I made one very similar to the one in the WoodCentral article with just a few minor changes. I added some brass 1/4-20" countersunk screws to one side to adjust the fit in the opening, and 4 more in the corners to adjust the height level with the table .. works great.

    As to the wood inserts .. I make them the proper thickness and just a tad wide and drive them into place with a rubber mallet (gently). It peels away the excess material, and they fit in the dovetail like they were poured there.
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  10. #10
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    I have some solid phenolic inserts I plan on trying this out with. I have a sawstop and the last thing I need is a metal throat plate to trip the break.

    I have some 1/4 MDF I may use, hopefully more stable, for the inserts. I also have plenty of scraps lying around I can experiment with.

    I'm thinking one for dados, and one for regular blades that I can still use my riving knife with.
    anybody seen my tape measure?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by zayd alle View Post
    Interesting info, Rick. Thanks for the link.

    While I'd consider myself someone inventive and while I've done a substantial amount of metalwork in my past, there are some endeavors where I'd rather not invest the time. Rather than machine a less-than-perfect one-off for myself, I'd much rather explore an option where I can pay someone else a fair payment to do the work for me... and whoever else would be interested.
    Less than perfect???? It's not like building a space shuttle. Tolerances of a five thousandths are easily maintained, even using your basic woodworking tools. It's the operator that's the key and you could easily make a dozen in one batch. The dovetailed inserts are very fast an easy to make. The zero dynamics insert was the best designed of the zci. Some guys pay for push sticks too! Non-ferrous works very easy. I find brass to be even nicer to work than aluminum. Think hardware. I've made knife hinges and handles with brass, a table saw and silver brazing.

  12. #12
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    I am interested. wosags61@aol.com

  13. #13
    i'd take one.
    Rob

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by zayd alle View Post
    Good advice, Bruce. Good dust collection certainly takes precedence over convenience.

    Do you happen to remember what you paid to have yours milled? Both shops I've asked have come back with quotes near $300.

    Thanks!

    Zayd
    Zayd, I made it myself. As I recall it took about 3 hours on my conventional (non cnc) mill.
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  15. #15
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    After reading this thread I went to the shop to make some ZCI's for my PM66. I've been putting this off for much longer than I should have.

    I ran the material(oak) through the planer to the proper thickness, rough cut the profile on the bandsaw, use a pattern bit on the router table, driller the two finger holes on the drill press and cut the slot for the Sharkguard splitter on the bandsaw and DONE. They fit flat on the tabs and didn't even need leveling screws.

    I made four of them in a half an hour.

    It would take me that long to make the slotted inserts.

    Just one opinion.

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