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Thread: Paint stir sticks in bulk??

  1. #1
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    Paint stir sticks in bulk??

    Where can I get a box of wooden paint stir sticks for relatively cheap?

    I'm talking about the ones you get for free at the paint store, but it seems that every time I need one I'm out.

    Jason

  2. #2
    automotive paint supply store will have them

  3. #3
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  4. #4
    I seem to have piles of long, thin strips that I've ripped off edges of boards. They're too narrow to use for anything, so I cut them about a foot long and use them as paint sticks.

  5. #5
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    I'm far too lazy to deal with that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Friedrichs View Post
    I seem to have piles of long, thin strips that I've ripped off edges of boards. They're too narrow to use for anything, so I cut them about a foot long and use them as paint sticks.

  6. #6
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    Google with "paint stir sticks" yields http://www.jamestowndistributors.com...ct.do?pid=2436

    Eleven cents each in quantities of 1000.

  7. #7
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    I am in the building supply business. If you go into your local hardware, lumberyard and talk to the person in paint, they will get you a box, or as many as you want.

    They likely have to pay for them, and will likely charge you for them..

    It may be different in the US. I dunno.

    We always have extra cases of them around and could easily look up the cost .. they are cheap.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason White View Post

    I'm talking about the ones you get for free at the paint store

    Jason
    I think you just answered your own question

    HD has galv pails full of them. Buy a pint of touch up paint and take 100 stirrers

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Friedrichs View Post
    I seem to have piles of long, thin strips that I've ripped off edges of boards. They're too narrow to use for anything, so I cut them about a foot long and use them as paint sticks.
    Me, too. I've got a lifetime supply of stirring sticks already.
    Cody


    He is no fool who gives up what he cannot keep for that which he cannot lose.

  10. #10
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    Wooden paint paddles are for amateurs... electric stirrers,,well,,

    Hello,
    If you go to a paint store - and look in the back room - you'll notice a lack of paddles being used.

    The two main reasons are:
    - Cost
    - They shed small particles.

    What most good paint store employee's (and ex-employee's such as myself) use is a metal spatula.
    They run ~ a buck or two at most stores.
    A kitchen supply store will have real heavy duty ones for about 10 times more.

    Wooden paddles will put a lot of crud into materials - dust, small splinters, etc.

    With a metal spatula, you can easily clean them both prior to use and after use.

    Water based just flushes off w/water.
    Solvent based just wipes off on the edge of a cardboard box & when it dries, a single edge razor blade strips it clean.

    Tip - cut the rounded end of the spatula off square w/some snips. That way you can get into the edge of the round cans and work all the settled material.

    Tip 2 - for "5's", go electric.
    Last edited by Rich Engelhardt; 05-17-2009 at 7:34 AM.
    try to remember that the very first step in finishing a project is choosing the material. You want to select wood that has the color and grain pattern than best suits your requirements as "covering up" those things after the fact makes your work much, much harder - Jim Becker

  11. #11
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    They're getting stingy with them lately. Used to be they'd give me 20 if I wanted. Now just one or two per customer.



    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Scoma View Post
    I think you just answered your own question

    HD has galv pails full of them. Buy a pint of touch up paint and take 100 stirrers

  12. #12
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    I've never had any problem with the wooden ones.



    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Engelhardt View Post
    Hello,
    If you go to a paint store - and look in the back room - you'll notice a lack of paddles being used.

    The two main reasons are:
    - Cost
    - They shed small particles.

    What most good paint store employee's (and ex-employee's such as myself) use is a metal spatula.
    They run ~ a buck or two at most stores.
    A kitchen supply store will have real heavy duty ones for about 10 times more.

    Wooden paddles will put a lot of crud into materials - dust, small splinters, etc.

    With a metal spatula, you can easily clean them both prior to use and after use.

    Water based just flushes off w/water.
    Solvent based just wipes off on the edge of a cardboard box & when it dries, a single edge razor blade strips it clean.

    Tip - cut the rounded end of the spatula off square w/some snips. That way you can get into the edge of the round cans and work all the settled material.

    Tip 2 - for "5's", go electric.

  13. #13
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    Com'on Jason, a block of scrap and five minutes at your new table saw and you could make a years supply. The time you spent running this thread and you could have made a life time supply.

    Richard
    Richard

    Wooden Railings by Richard & Son

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason White View Post
    I'm far too lazy to deal with that.
    He's lazy. Why discuss it further!

  15. #15
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    When I used Sears paint many years ago they gave out plastic stir sticks. I have been using them off and on for the past 30 or more years. All you have to do is not be lazy , clean them after each use and they will last forever.
    David B

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