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Thread: Does anyone have a Tormek T3?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Bradenton, Fl
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    Does anyone have a Tormek T3?

    I have decided to buy a Tormek but I'm not sure which one I should get, the T3 or T7. The T3 has a small wheel and a plastic case which makes it lighter to move around the shop. One of my concerns would be the plastic case and vibration. Has anyone had a problem with the T3?

  2. #2
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    Apr 2009
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    Crossville, TN
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    Hello Robert, I cannot answer your questions about the T3 but I do have the T7 and will give you my opinion. The majority of my sharpening is on chisels, plane irons, turning tools, knives and scissors, in that order. I would not want to be without the Tormek. That being said, it is not convenient for me to pull it out and set it up each time I need to sharpen a small number of tools as I do not have room for a dedicated station for it. However, I believe it does an outstanding job.

    What I am using more and more since beginning to use a lathe is an idea I got from a turner on another forum. I also have a Grizzly 2 knife grinder that I adapted to hold the Tormek jigs on, which provides the same control as when using the Tormek. There is no setup time for me as it does have a dedicated space and in I believe it offers some substantial benefits. Good belts are reasonably inexpensive, it takes only a few seconds to change from one grit to another, all with the same settings and if one desires to buff, a cloth belt with buffing compound can be used and again, with no need for readjustment of any kind. For me, the variety of tools I need to sharpen makes this a no brainer. For a turner, if 80 or 120 grit grind is preferable, put that grit on, make a pass and its done. OTOH, if you like your chisels and plane irons buffed so you can see your nose hair, as I do, then take a few seconds and step through the grits and buffing. Another advantage, small as it may be, there is never any dressing of the wheel needed.

    This is nothing more than another idea and if I find time to do as much turning as I would like, perhaps I will try the Wolverine systems that most turners seem to prefer. However, for the present time, I use the Tormek if I have many tools to sharpen and the knife grinder if I need fast and only a few.

    If you find this interesting, I will be happy to answer any questions if I can and, I can provide pictures if desired.

    Good luck with your decision, the Tormek is very expensive, in my opinion, but it is a quality tool that does an excellent job, plus being very versatile.

  3. #3
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    Jan 2008
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    Loudonville, NY
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    488
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Parrish View Post
    I have decided to buy a Tormek but I'm not sure which one I should get, the T3 or T7. The T3 has a small wheel and a plastic case which makes it lighter to move around the shop. One of my concerns would be the plastic case and vibration. Has anyone had a problem with the T3?
    I have not used the T3, but do own the T7. Honestly, you do sacrifice speed for easy repeatability of sharping and with nil risk of bluing your edges. I know that Tormek machines are well built and would likely last you a long time as a hobbiest turner. With that said, I would point out that the largest difference I know about (whether they are important to you is another issue): smaller wheel = more hollower grind, wheel is not as wide, and less power. Again, would any of this matter to you?

    The other thing I have discovered is that it is a little messey with some drips and splashes, but I find that I prefer that to having buring metal dust flying all over me and my shop (bigger mess and fire hazard).

    I hope I was of some help.

  4. #4
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    Jan 2008
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    Loudonville, NY
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    One more note - I do use my dry grinder for sharpening scrapers and my roughing gouge.

  5. #5
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    Jan 2008
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    Ted, what model Grizzly do you have? I have the Wolverine system, but I still have trouble getting my turning tools sharp and the correct bevel. I guess I must be sharpening challenged!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Crossville, TN
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    It is the G1015 and can be seen here.

    http://www.grizzly.com/products/g1015

    I do not see any reason that the Wolverine system would not work with the belt grinder but have no experience so really cannot say.

    I have never used the Wolverine system but getting tools sharp with the Tormek jigs is a piece of cake. A couple of easily made jigs ensures repeatability of angles and speed.

    I have an 8" grinder but have not seen the need at this time to invest in the Wolverine, perhaps later but I'm not convinced I need it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Boise, Idaho
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    Robert,
    I have the T7. I originally bought it to sharpen my kitchen knives with the understanding that I could also use it to sharpen every edge in my shop. As a testament to the Tormek, I have no hair on my hands and arms. When I test an edge I dry shave where ever there is hair. No, I haven't tried a face shave yet but because the edges I get are so sharp I'm considering trying a straight razor for face shaving.

    Sharpening on a dry grinder is a devil's trick. You try and try and end up with blunt stumps. Then someone shows you the trick. Usually only takes 60 seconds. After that, all of your tools come out sharp.

    Trent Bosch showed me the trick in a class. I brought all my stumps to the class. He brought me to the grinder, had me do the setup and zip, zip. Razors. This is something that really needs to be done face-to-face. You can read all the posts in the world but it won't really help. Take a class with a reputable turner, even if you have to pay for a private lesson.

    As to the T3 vs T7, I wanted the bigger wheel for the mass and angle.

    Keep asking, keep questioning,
    Burt

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Nehalem, Oregon
    Posts
    206

    Go larger

    I have about every sharpening system known to man -- at least my wife thinks so. Actually I do have allot, since it is a part time income for me. The T7 is the way to go if you are going to use the Tormek. The most frustrating part of the Tormek system is a re-shaping of the tool takes forever! Sharpening isn't long, and honing less, but if you wish to try a new grind like adding sharp wings to the bowl gouge then the Tormek can take a couple of hours to do what another system will whip out in minutes. The smaller wheel will wear out sooner than the larger, and take longer to finish the reshaping job. If you are doing turning tools only (which is rare) go with the Wolverine or some other dry system. I say rare because your wife will think up a ton of stuff to sharpen and on and on and . . . The Tormek will give you a wider variety of options, jigs, and capabilities than any other set up out there. For the home sharpener the jigs that come with the Tormek system is worth it. I can not live with inconsistent product and the Tormek jigs assure consistency.

    I have about 12 other pieces so PM if you have a question specific to a need.
    Good luck.
    Phil B.

  9. #9
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    Jan 2008
    Location
    Bradenton, Fl
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    Philip, Your not alone, I has several sharpening systems including the Wolverine and a 20 year old Makita wet system (horizontal stone) stored in the shop. I bought a Cusinart sharpener for my kitchen knives but it never work right. I am leaning toward the T7 at this point.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Nehalem, Oregon
    Posts
    206

    For Knives

    For knives I use the- Edge Pro -- made in Hood River Oregon. I bought it an love it. I can do any type of chef knife made and scissors to. I am not part of the company in any way just love em. I like much better than anything else on the market.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Goodland, Kansas
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    22,603
    I would go with the T-7. I bought mine and sharpened all my wife's kitchen knives, all of her scissors and her gardening tools. She thinks it is the greatest thing since apple butter and I am not telling her any different. I use the wolverine jig to shape my turning tools if I have to but when shaped I sharpen on the T-7 and hone. They seem to last a lot longer.
    Bernie

    Never put off until tomorrow what you can do the day after tomorrow.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.



  12. #12
    I heard from my friend that works at Rockler, the Jet grinder that works like the tormek is almost just as good for a lot less. but the Tormek jigs are better.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Kapolei Hawaii
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    You can find a lot of Jet/Tormek comparisons. There is no right answer, just what you would want to spend. I have a T-7, and would pass on the T-3. It seems too small, and wheel speed is important. The T-7 grinds slow enough as it is, a smaller wheel would take even longer.
    I think the T-7 is awesome.
    I do know a guy that owned both, and the reason I got the Tormek is the support arm on the Tormek is much stronger than the Jet. The Jet's support arm moves a lot more than the Tormek. More movement = more error.

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