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Thread: Delta Jointer DJ-15 Question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Chatsworth, CA
    Posts
    9

    Delta Jointer DJ-15 Question

    Yesterday I was checking to make sure the tables (outfeed and infeed) were square to the fence. I was only able to make the infeed table square to the fence. The outfeed table was a little off...just a hair. I don't have a feeler gauge so I do not have an exact measurement. I have the manual and do not see an adjustment for the tables. Is there a way to make this adjustment?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI
    Posts
    20
    The DJ-15 is a parallelagram setup, basically a smaller version of the DJ-20. Each corner of the table is adjustable by rotating the cam on the pivot arms. Chances are there are 2 set screws securing the cam, so you'll have to remove one, then loosen the one underneath. You'll have to make a spanner wrench of some sort to turn the cam, or 'invent' some method of turning it. It's actually pretty straightforward once you see how it works...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Easthampton, MA
    Posts
    819
    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Levine View Post
    Yesterday I was checking to make sure the tables (outfeed and infeed) were square to the fence. I was only able to make the infeed table square to the fence. The outfeed table was a little off...just a hair. I don't have a feeler gauge so I do not have an exact measurement. I have the manual and do not see an adjustment for the tables. Is there a way to make this adjustment?
    You haven't done enough investigation to prove your theory. The fence could be twisted. I wouldn't adjust anything until you understand all the fine points of a jointer. As simple as it seems a jointer is more complex in it's adjustment. I have been repairing machines professionally for many years. One of the primary tools is a good straight edge about 2/3 the length of the overall bed. A good level will suffice if you know how to verify it's accuracy. A feeler gauge is a must and a dial indicator is useful but not necessary, but seeing as they are about $12 at the metal supply places it's a nice thing to have. There is a logical progression to check a jointer. John White has a book on Taunton Press on machine adjusting. Haven't read it, but it would be a good start.

    Also a twisted fence can be straightened. Cast iron can be flexed. You clamp one end to a solid bench and clamp a 2 x 4 to the other end and slightly over bend it.
    Last edited by Rick Lizek; 06-23-2009 at 5:20 AM.

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