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Thread: How Do I Route a Rectanguar Hole

  1. #1

    How Do I Route a Rectanguar Hole

    I am toying around with the idea of routing a rectangular pattern into a gun grip blank. I want to set a burl inside the rectangle, glue up and then shape for a gun grip.

    I am at a loss as how to build a jig to do this.

    Any thoughts?

  2. #2
    There is really no way to rout a square inside corner with a round bit. You can make a template to rout a rectangle but you will need to make the inside corners square with chisels or a small saw.
    David DeCristoforo

  3. #3
    Because router bits are round, you cannot route a square hole. It will have rounded corners. They make a template bit for inlays that does a good job for making mating sized parts for inlays however you still need to trim corners to square.
    Lee Schierer - McKean, PA

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  4. #4
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    Well, 'suppose this is obvious, but you cannot rout a completely rectangular hole - the best you can get is a rectangular shape with rounded corners that you will then have to chisel square by hand.

    There are a couple of easy routes to your goal that I can think of. If you want to use a router to do it, you'll probably need to build a fixture to hold the gun stock firmly and to give the router a flat surface to ride on. Then one uses a plywood template and a pattern bit to get the shape you want. Another route to the same thing is a pattern and a pattern sleeve that mounts in the hole in your router's base plate.

    Another way to do this would be with a hollow chisel mortiser, though again, you will likely have to build a fixture to hold the complex shape of the blank still while you use the mortiser to create a rectangular/square hole.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by David Keller NC View Post
    There are a couple of easy routes to your goal that I can think of. If you want to use a router to do it, you'll probably need to build a fixture to hold the gun stock firmly and to give the router a flat surface to ride on. Then one uses a plywood template and a pattern bit to get the shape you want. Another route to the same thing is a pattern and a pattern sleeve that mounts in the hole in your router's base plate.
    I have an accessory that came with my router. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00..._ya_oh_product I wonder if this could be of some help?

    I would like to see a setup that is already working so i can get some ideas.

  6. #6
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    This is simple, Folks, he needs a SQUARE bit!!!












    Crown Molding: cut, cope, cuss, caulk, chill....

    Did you know SMC is user supported? Please help.

  7. #7
    LOL...

    I think I have an idea about how to do this.

    I take a rough outline of a grip and cut out a piece of MDF so that the grip fits perfectly inside the cut out. I then cut the hole I want to rout...sandwich the two together and rout out.

    What do you think?


    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Padilla View Post
    This is simple, Folks, he needs a SQUARE bit!!!













  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    Because router bits are round, you cannot route a square hole. It will have rounded corners. ...
    Actually that's not true. Its because the router has a center shaft and rotates, that is what makes it round. The bit could be square, triangular, whatever and it would still result in a round cut because the mechanics of a router.

    Not trying to be smart, just saying.
    Last edited by Keith Outten; 07-07-2009 at 4:24 AM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Murray View Post
    I have an accessory that came with my router. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00..._ya_oh_product I wonder if this could be of some help?

    I would like to see a setup that is already working so i can get some ideas.
    The little thing that looks a bit like a t-nut with a round top with serrations is the pattern-routing sleeve. You can mount that accessory in the base of your router, then put a straight bit through it. The sleeve rides around the inside of a hole cut out of a piece of plywood or mdf (your template), while the bit cuts out a slightly smaller hole in the workpiece.

    In fact, this "slightly smaller" feature is used to route both the recess and the insert with a bit more sophisticated pattern-routing bearing set. The sets have differently sized sleeves so that with one size, you route the recess, and with a smaller sleeve, you cut the insert out of a solid block of wood.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by David Keller NC View Post
    The little thing that looks a bit like a t-nut with a round top with serrations is the pattern-routing sleeve. You can mount that accessory in the base of your router, then put a straight bit through it. The sleeve rides around the inside of a hole cut out of a piece of plywood or mdf (your template), while the bit cuts out a slightly smaller hole in the workpiece.

    In fact, this "slightly smaller" feature is used to route both the recess and the insert with a bit more sophisticated pattern-routing bearing set. The sets have differently sized sleeves so that with one size, you route the recess, and with a smaller sleeve, you cut the insert out of a solid block of wood.
    cool...I'll have to check that out. I wondered what all that stuff was.

  11. If you're only doing one, it may just be easier to get out a sharp knife and chisel, especially since whatever patterning setup you use with a router is going to require some type of jig to hold the setup. If you have a dremel and base, you may be able to use that and might not have to build a jig.

  12. #12
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    An expensive way to go for one job -- but you could make a series of passes with a dedicated mortising machine. They come with a special bit that makes square holes. Or, they make a drill press attachment that does the same thing.

    Jason

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Murray View Post
    I am toying around with the idea of routing a rectangular pattern into a gun grip blank. I want to set a burl inside the rectangle, glue up and then shape for a gun grip.

    I am at a loss as how to build a jig to do this.

    Any thoughts?

  13. #13
    Join Date
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    Williamsburg,Va.
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    10,079
    I is possible to rout a square hole,if you are a machinist. On my Bridgeport,I can put an adjustable angle head on the quill (Quillmaster).Then,using a flat sided 60 degree pointed carbide cutter,looking straight down,the cutter is angled at 45 degrees into the corners,in turn,of the round cornered rectangular or square hole just milled. If the 60 degree cutter is also angled downwards at the correct angle,the cutting edge of the cutter will rest flat on each side of the corner once it has milled,or "routed" its way just enough to get the "round" corner milled out fully. In actual practice,this does not make a seamlessly milled out corner,perfectly blended with the inside sides of the hole. it does get you close enough to touch up with a file. This process also can square up the bottom corners of a blind hole without further angle adjustment.

    Maybe some woodworker can cobble up a jig to hold a router at the vertical and horizontal angles required,and also have a vertical slide on the router to enter the hole with. There are angular tip router bits sold. They do have to be 60 degree.

  14. #14
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    I just made grips for my 45. I traced the outline on the new wood and cut them out with the band saw. Then I screwed the old grips to the blanks and used the sander to shape them. I thought of using the router but nixed the idea.
    Never, under any circumstances, combine a sleeping pill, and laxative on the same night.

  15. #15
    First, make your inlay blank. It will need to have radiused corners that match your pattern bit( usually 1/4".) Next, take four pieces of wood, and surround pattern, pocket screw them together. Then take this assembly and use to guide the pattern bit. I like to use a 1/4" shank, 1/2" dia, 1/2" pattern bit from MLCS for this operation. You will be doing the same operation as fitting a router plate into a top. If corners have to be square, then inlay can be square, but some chisel work will be necessary to square the corners in gun stock.

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