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Thread: Looking for a high-quality coping saw

  1. #1

    Looking for a high-quality coping saw

    I'm in the market for a new coping saw to replace the worn-out weak-framed one that I have used for half my life. To my suprise, I've found very little online that resembles a quality product. Most of them are made by Irwin, Groz, Stanley and similar companies, and all of the saws fall at or below the $12 price point. I was thinking that Veritas, Wade Garrett or Lie-Neilsen would make something but I've found nothing online.

    Looking for something with a solid frame, well made, nice wood handle. You know...Something I'd be proud to own and use, like I am with my nice planes.

    Anyone know of anything or anyone that makes them?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Brooklyn, NYC
    Posts
    501

    quality coping saw

    I now how you feel. I looked for a long time until I found an old Miller Falls at a flea market. Solid, machined parts, fine wood handle ect... I now that doesn't help your search any...

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Wingert View Post
    I'm in the market for a new coping saw to replace the worn-out weak-framed one that I have used for half my life....I was thinking that Veritas, Wade Garrett or Lie-Neilsen would make something but I've found nothing online.
    The one Lee Valley sells works fine for me...I'm no saw expert, but it was far superior to the cheap weak-framed one I had before.

    http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.a...=1,42884,42902

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    extreme southeast Nebraska
    Posts
    3,107
    I just made my own.

    Jr.
    Hand tools are very modern- they are all cordless
    NORMAL is just a setting on the washing machine.
    Be who you are and say what you feel... because those that matter... don't mind...and those that mind...don't matter!
    By Hammer and Hand All Arts Do Stand

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Tidewater, VA
    Posts
    538
    Harry, do you favor any brand/type blades in particular?
    Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing ever happened.
    - Churchill

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Williamsburg,Va.
    Posts
    9,681
    For many years I used a quick and dirty wooden coping saw I put together in the Musical Instrument Shop. I left it there. It was lighter weight than yours,Harry,but it worked fine,and got a lot of use,having no bandsaw.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    extreme southeast Nebraska
    Posts
    3,107
    Whatever the Hdwe store carries, small 1/2 horse town.

    LOL, preferably sharp ones.
    Jr.
    Hand tools are very modern- they are all cordless
    NORMAL is just a setting on the washing machine.
    Be who you are and say what you feel... because those that matter... don't mind...and those that mind...don't matter!
    By Hammer and Hand All Arts Do Stand

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    extreme southeast Nebraska
    Posts
    3,107
    I cut the coping saw blades up to fit my Neander Bandsaw Too. FWIW



    It does a real good job on some of the wee dovetails I sometimes cut in 1/4 material.
    Jr.
    Hand tools are very modern- they are all cordless
    NORMAL is just a setting on the washing machine.
    Be who you are and say what you feel... because those that matter... don't mind...and those that mind...don't matter!
    By Hammer and Hand All Arts Do Stand

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    707
    Aaron,
    I like this one:
    http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...r=coping%20saw
    It's the Olson saw that TFWW also sells. It's good quality and the blade is adjustable 360 degrees (I think, maybe only 180).
    It's inexpensive, but works really well. Pick up a pack of their blades while your at it.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Friesen View Post
    The one Lee Valley sells works fine for me...I'm no saw expert, but it was far superior to the cheap weak-framed one I had before.

    http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.a...=1,42884,42902
    Thank you Chris, I looked all over their site and nothing came up before I came here to ask. I'll be ordering this tomorrow. German made...They usually make good stuff and I've been happy with my other Veritas tools.

    Thanks to everyone, I appreciate the links and seeing the true NEander coping saw and bandsaw is amazing.

  11. #11
    The Olsen model sold by TFWW and Rockler. It looks to be less expensive at TFWW, and more blade options are available.

    http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/M...&Category_Code=

    or step up to their bowsaw:

    http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/M...&Category_Code=

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    2,790
    The English brand Eclipse is a decent saw; I've had mine for decades, probably, so I'm not entirely sure it's still available.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Bucks County PA
    Posts
    646

    Another vote for TFWW bowsaw

    Quote Originally Posted by Danny Thompson View Post
    The Olsen model sold by TFWW and Rockler. It looks to be less expensive at TFWW, and more blade options are available.

    http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/M...&Category_Code=

    or step up to their bowsaw:

    http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/M...&Category_Code=
    I know you're going to order a coping saw saw from LV, but I just thought I'd add this.

    I just finished building my second TFWW 12" bowsaw and think it's the neatest thing since sliced bread. You get 3 blades with the kit and the thinnest will let you cut seriously tight circles!
    Dominic Greco

  14. #14

    Coping Saw

    This saw is made by one of our members. It looks very nice.

    http://www.chestertoolworks.com/bowsaws.htm

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Country Club, MO, USA
    Posts
    897
    Another vote for the bow saw from TFWW:




    It is great when removing waste between tails and dovetails, and for tight-curve work. The 12-inch blades are quite amazing, thin-kerf, and cut beautifully.

    .

    Al
    http://www.sawmillcreek.org/images/buttons/fotc.gif
    Sandal Woods - Fine Woodworking

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