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Thread: Shingle making jig?

  1. #1
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    Shingle making jig?

    My wife and I decided that we are going to make our own siding shingles for our new house, and so I am on the prowl for jigs, either for sale commercially or home made. I like home made. I saw one working once that reset the block every cut in a semi production sort of setup, and that is what I had in mind.

    Let me know what you know or have seen on the net.

    Thanks, Larry

  2. #2
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    Wow, that's an ambitious undertaking, Larry; let us know how it goes.

    What kind of wood are you going to use?

  3. #3
    not a jig, a machine...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfKocMDCsQM

    Mike

  4. #4
    "not a jig, a machine..."

    There's nothing about the blades on those things that makes me even slightly uneasy....
    David DeCristoforo

  5. #5
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    Wow Larry you are ambitious. This is the kind of thing I did when I was younger. I made EVERYTHING myself. I gotta admit it would be fun. Of course it might be way cheaper to buy the shingles. Even if you have free seasoned wood it would take lots of time.

    A froe might be fastest if you consider all the set-up and expense.

    If you saw them are you thinking of a jig on a bandsaw?

  6. #6
    Don't want to hijack this thread, but take a second and check this machine out. Ya wanna talk about cool wood cutting machines?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=te3FBhdqgK8

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Joiner View Post
    Wow Larry you are ambitious. This is the kind of thing I did when I was younger. I made EVERYTHING myself. I gotta admit it would be fun. Of course it might be way cheaper to buy the shingles. Even if you have free seasoned wood it would take lots of time.

    A froe might be fastest if you consider all the set-up and expense.

    If you saw them are you thinking of a jig on a bandsaw?
    I am not all that ambitious, it will only be a 1000 sq ft house. Yes I was thinking bandsaw. I'll have to buy a larger one. My ex sold a Hitachi converted to an induction motor that would have been perfect with its double bearing guides and 2" blade, so I may look around for one of those used.

    I was looking at the air cylinders on my rabbiting machine yesterday and a jig came to me using air. It will be a sled with a tall fence pivoted in the middle at the point where the teeth meet the wood, and the ends will be pushed back and forth by air cylinders that are plumbed opposite, one pushing as one pulls. A third long travel cylinder will push the cedar block at the pivot point constantly, with light pressure so that the block tips back and forth with a foot pedal, and the clamp with another lever control. I have a vague idea for a air powered feed system, but can't see that clearly just yet.

    On the other hand, if there is one on the market.....

  8. #8
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    Larry

    August 13,14,15 there is an Old Engine Show in Buckley Mi, south of traverse city.

    They have a shingle mill that they demo at the show you might want to contact them they might be delighted to cut your shingles for you.

    http://www.buckleyoldengineshow.org/
    Thank You
    Ed

  9. #9
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    I made mostly hand split roof shakes and some siding many years ago when I volunteer at a local colonel restoration project.. It was a lot of work and it took quite a long time to master the technique - It was a little dangerous

    Did I mention........ it was slow!

    The tools need to be very sharp and the wood first rate.

    We also did saw some for a newer building -- only 200 years old -- I remember a lot of the cracking

  10. #10
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    Splitting with a froe is probably the best way. When I first came to Williamsburg,there was an old guy who demonstrated shingle making outdoors. I can't recall how he tapered them. Might have used a hatchet on their backsides. He used cypress logs sawed to shingle length.

    Call 757-229-1000,Colonial Williamsburg,and ask for Garland Wood. Leave him a message,and he should return your call. His housewrights make shingles when needed.

    I think you are in for a lot of work!

  11. #11
    Go to Woodmizer's site and take a gander at their shingle/lap siding attachment they sell for their bandsaws.
    Maybe that will give you some ideas.


  12. #12
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    George, Steve thanks for the number and tips. Ill check both out.

    I have a froe but I am after the sawn shingle look and the tightness. I have done small building with hand splits I made from the swamp to the roof, and some sawn shingles that I did freehand, but my hands are old and have ten percent less fingers now so I will make a jig, and that will allow my wife to run the setup as well. She is excited about it. Neither of us are afraid of work.

    I only need 13 square, its a small house, a replica of a railroad station actually. Board and batten would be more in line with the railroad station theme, but I am using stress skin panels so I don't feel I have a good enough nailer for boards. 1/2" OSB is all I will have for a nailer.

    I wanted to do an old school house, but I have a 24x56 foot basement to make use of and the old school would just not fit.

    Ed, I was just at the old flywheelers show in Boyne Falls, I will have to run over to Buckley. Are you going?

  13. #13
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    I do not think you would have a problem with the SSP -- 1/2 sheathing is quite standard.

    I have also seen horizontal nailer boards installed if you want an air space

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Godley View Post
    I do not think you would have a problem with the SSP -- 1/2 sheathing is quite standard.

    I have also seen horizontal nailer boards installed if you want an air space
    If I am to install vertical board and batten I always have horizontal nailers at no farther apart than 2'. I know the manufacturers of the panel will tell you it is ok to nail wood siding to the OSB, but that is a crock of ****. Shingles would be the most I would risk.

    The problem we have with the airspace here is that the space becomes a highway for bugs, and the next thing you know you have a two foot woodpecker ripping off your shingles

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