Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Performax drum sander for Radial Arm Saw

  1. #1

    Performax drum sander for Radial Arm Saw

    Have any of you used one of these? Do they work well? The price is right, but it is a 4 hour round trip. I'd like to know if it is worth spending half of my Saturday to go get it.





    Here's some additional information that may be helpful.
    • From what I can tell, it looks like a Performax 22-44 Pro without the table.
    • I intend to use this to thickness figured stock and thin stock for bent wood laminations.
    • I actually have the stuff to build one of the under the table mounted ones like they sell at Stockroomsupply.com, but I haven't finished it because:
      1. I really don't have the room.
      2. I'm not sure if I can control the thickness of the material using a sander without a height adjustment.
    So, I guess the real question is, should I spend my Saturday finishing the sander that I've already got, or do I drive to BFE to buy the one in the picture? The cost of both options is about the same. Which one will yield the most consistent and predictable thickness?
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    I have profound doubts that the design worked.
    The RAS just is not made to take the sort of upward force ion the arm that a drum sander will exert

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Snowflake, AZ
    Posts
    791
    I used to have the stand alone model. IMHO it wasn't worth anywhere close to what I paid as I could NEVER keep it aligned.
    The Stockroom supply "V" sander does the job for me. But, it isn't a thicknesser. I have used it as such and was pleased with the results. However, Many, many passes are required and you need a method of controlling the work so as to maintain an even swath across the work.
    The "V" sander is great for evening out glue ups and face frames, as well as sanding individual parts before glue up. It saves me mucho time.
    Gene
    Life is too short for cheap tools
    GH

  4. #4
    Gene,
    The stand alone models did seem to be pretty expensive. This one's only going for $150. To me, that's almost too good to pass up. In your experience with the stand alone model, if it were only $150, would you have been more impressed with the results?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Independence, MO, USA.
    Posts
    2,474
    Quote Originally Posted by Gene Howe View Post
    I used to have the stand alone model. IMHO it wasn't worth anywhere close to what I paid as I could NEVER keep it aligned.
    The Stockroom supply "V" sander does the job for me. But, it isn't a thicknesser. I have used it as such and was pleased with the results. However, Many, many passes are required and you need a method of controlling the work so as to maintain an even swath across the work.
    The "V" sander is great for evening out glue ups and face frames, as well as sanding individual parts before glue up. It saves me mucho time.
    I asked specifically about thicknessing with the v sander.

    Their response was a couple of options. For thick boards, they would recommend (or at least the presenter), running it through a planner, then final sanding with the v sander.
    For just a little bit, a reverse sled was recommended. For this, you have two boards, the thickness you want your final work (to the sides like fences), you then run the board over the sander, with a backer board. When the backer runs on the side fences, your at your thickness.
    This isn't going to be as fast as a thickness sander, but it was designed for different purposes.

    I was looking at the same sander as the original poster a few years back, and read how the one above (besides the flex issue) didn't do as well due to lack of something to consistently feed it in.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Mission, Texas
    Posts
    975
    I agree with Cliff. Even our big RAS 16" Delta experiences some flex with a dado head or moulder head. I think a sander would exert too much force and possible damage the saw.
    Just my opinion, as I have not seen such a setup.
    Mickey

  7. #7
    Thanks, guys. I'll give the V-groove sander a shot. It is probably better to have dedicated machines anyway.

    -Ben

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Sumter, SC
    Posts
    2,231
    These sanders were 22-44's. It actually sold as 4 kits. The sanding head, stand, motor and feed table. From the photo, This appears to be the sanding head only. Since it doesn't have a feed table, pass it up. I used one of the kits (actually all 4 kits) in my shop for several years and it did a good job. Initially, it did take a little while to make friends with the machine.


    Burt

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •