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Thread: Exterior painting cedar posts: water repellent before oil primer necessary?

  1. #1

    Exterior painting cedar posts: water repellent before oil primer necessary?

    I am about to sand and finish some 6x6 cedar newel posts in my porch. I am planning to use oil based primer (at least two coats) and 100% acrylic topcoat (2 coats). I have read that it may be advisable to coat the cedar post with (paintable) water repellent / preservative before priming. How essential is that step? According to one water repellent can I saw, I would need to wait at least a week before the oil primer; however, I am in a bit of a hurry to finish this project. (The posts will be installed on top of adjustable post anchors and will therefore not contact the ground). Thanks

    (By the way, the posts haven't been installed yet, so I have access to all sides)
    Last edited by Carlos Arteta; 11-10-2009 at 5:54 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Dallas, Tx.
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    Paint. A temporary conditioner that will need continuous maintenance forever.
    Well it's true. However, if your posts are dry, you can prime with oil primer and top with two coats acrylic. I think the repellent acts as a sealer. I have never used it as such. I think your using two coats primer is due to the sponge effect of the cedar. That primer needs to really dry before you top coat. Read the instructions on the can. I hope you arn't using the Home center paint.
    Phil in Big D
    The only difference between a taxidermist and the taxman, is that the taxidermist leaves the skin. Mark Twain

  3. #3
    Thanks, Phil. I am using Benjamin Moore products. (BM Fresh Start Fast Dry Alkyd Primer 094, especially recommended for blocking the tannin bleed on cedar; then MoorGlo 100% Acrylic House & Trim Paint N096).

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carlos Arteta View Post
    Thanks, Phil. I am using Benjamin Moore products. (BM Fresh Start Fast Dry Alkyd Primer 094, especially recommended for blocking the tannin bleed on cedar; then MoorGlo 100% Acrylic House & Trim Paint N096).
    Step to the front of the class, Carlos. Post your finish product and good luck.
    Phil in Big D
    The only difference between a taxidermist and the taxman, is that the taxidermist leaves the skin. Mark Twain

  5. #5
    with oil primer and paint we used to 50/50 turps and blo
    then prime when dry (about a week)
    Fast drying primer never seems to soak in enough and hold as well as slow drying...

    thata be my 2

  6. #6
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    agree on the 50/50 turp and blo. not as big a deal on cedar, but the turp on other woods not only helps the blo dry faster, but, quite simply, is poisonous. so will be a good insect repellent and get rid of any fungus that might be around the wood.

  7. #7
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    I don't understand the preservative for cedar. It would certainly make sense other less rot-resistant species, such as fir.

    Do be sure to use a primer that clearly specifies that it blocks bleed-through for cedar and redwood. Many so-called "stain blocking" primers will not block cedar and redwood bleed-through.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Carlos Arteta View Post
    Thanks, Phil. I am using Benjamin Moore products. (BM Fresh Start Fast Dry Alkyd Primer 094, especially recommended for blocking the tannin bleed on cedar; then MoorGlo 100% Acrylic House & Trim Paint N096).
    Your plan is good, no need for anything else.
    If the posts are not sitting in water they and the paint will last a long time.

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