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Thread: Naval Jelly Question

  1. #1
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    Naval Jelly Question

    Before reading the forums, I went to HD to get something to remove some rust off a jointer. I got some naval jelly and followed the instructions precisely. It left a wierd discoloration on my jointer. Had I read the forum, I would have known this. Anyhow, does anyone know how to get this discoloration off? I have heard fine grit sandpaper and WD-40 from a couple of people, I have not tried this, is this the best way to go about this?

  2. #2
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    Bob,

    Be carful with the sand paper. I would use a scotch brite pad or some steel wool and the WD-40. Then make sure you clean the WD-40 real good with some alcohol or something that evaporates quickly, I use brake cleaner. If you dont get the WD-40 off completly and it gets on or in your wood it can and will mess up the finshing process.

  3. #3
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    Hmm, I tried that and did not get anywhere. I will put more elbow grease into it and try again.

  4. #4
    The grey discoloration actually helps protect the metal against further rusting.

    I agree that it looks awful but if you can live with it then it's good to leave it on.

  5. #5
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    I am going to find a way to get it off if I can, but have had no luck so far.

  6. #6
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    I would use a hard felt wheel on a drill, charged with some buffing compound. You can expect that to take a while. ;-)

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    Get a can of Bar Keepers Friend. It's a powder in a shake can. Cleaning supplies aisle in the supermarket.
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  8. #8
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    Naval jelly (phosphoric acid) reacts with the rust (iron oxide) to produce iron phosphate (and H2O). Iron phosphate is a rust preventative. So other than being unattractive, is not a bad thing.

    Most importantly, have you made sure you got all the jelly off the jointer? Its an acid so if its caught in any cracks / seams / etc, it could still be eating away at the metal.

  9. #9
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    From the horse's mouth

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Haskett View Post
    Before reading the forums, I went to HD to get something to remove some rust off a jointer. I got some naval jelly and followed the instructions precisely. It left a wierd discoloration on my jointer. Had I read the forum, I would have known this. Anyhow, does anyone know how to get this discoloration off? I have heard fine grit sandpaper and WD-40 from a couple of people, I have not tried this, is this the best way to go about this?
    Bob,

    From Locktite's Product Question's page:

    *******************
    I used Naval Jelly Rust Dissolver and got a white “haze” on the item I was refinishing. What should I do?

    The white haze occurs when small amounts of phosphoric and sulfuric acids oxidize. Simply alternate between hot and cold water rinses. Once oxidation stops, the haze will disappear.
    *******************

    After the haze is gone and the acids are neutralized I would dry the surface thoroughly and treat it with an appropriate topcoat like paste wax. Some folks use other products like Bosheild for this purpose.
    "Live like no one else, so later, you can LIVE LIKE NO ONE ELSE!"
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  10. #10
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    Looks like Charles has the answer, but removing the table to rinse would be a PITA. I'd just leave it. Definitely do not attack it with anything more abrasive than steel wool or a scotch brite pad.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Wiggins View Post
    Bob,

    From Locktite's Product Question's page:

    *******************
    I used Naval Jelly Rust Dissolver and got a white “haze” on the item I was refinishing. What should I do?

    The white haze occurs when small amounts of phosphoric and sulfuric acids oxidize. Simply alternate between hot and cold water rinses. Once oxidation stops, the haze will disappear.
    *******************

    After the haze is gone and the acids are neutralized I would dry the surface thoroughly and treat it with an appropriate topcoat like paste wax. Some folks use other products like Bosheild for this purpose.
    This may be the answer, but what I have I would most definately not describe as a white haze. It is a pink or brown very obvious discoloration.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Haskett View Post
    This may be the answer, but what I have I would most definately not describe as a white haze. It is a pink or brown very obvious discoloration.
    Its more than likely the iron phosphate, and water will not get rid of it. Its from a chemical reaction. You basically added a thin veneer of new material on your jointer where you formerly had rust.

    The loctite site is more than likely referring to a condition where the components in their rust remover have oxidized.

  13. #13
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    Well, in that case...

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Haskett View Post
    This may be the answer, but what I have I would most definately not describe as a white haze. It is a pink or brown very obvious discoloration.
    Bob,

    "Pink or brown" sounds like there is a lot of Naval Jelly left, not just residue.

    I would first try removing it with a relatively damp sponge, but if it is dried and that probably won't do it. I'd then use a damp Scotch Brite pad to loosen it and wipe clean with a damp sponge or cloth. Then wipe everything down with clean damp sponge or cloth to make sure you have all of the residue off. Then dry thoroughly.

    If you have any way to warm the metal above normal room temp (direct sunlight, halogen flood lamp, etc.) that would be good. That will help drive out the moisture and make it easier to wax, and easier for the wax to penetrate. You don't want to overheat it. You want it warm to the touch but not hot. Apply a thin, even layer of paste wax and allow it to cool and dry. A haze is a good indicator that it's cool and dry enough. Then buff it out by hand with a buffing pad or soft cloth. I'd apply a second coat of wax and buff it out again for good measure. You'll be pleased how much more easily your workpieces will move over the bed.
    "Live like no one else, so later, you can LIVE LIKE NO ONE ELSE!"
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  14. #14
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    Thanks. I got everything off last night with some fine steel wool, scott brite pad, brush, and some mineral spirits. Looks good as new now. But that was just the bed, now I have to work on the fence which has more rust on it than the bed did. Not sure if I should use the Naval Jelly again or try something else.

  15. #15
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    Bob, it is naval jelly. Only for use on aircraft carriers or your belly button.
    My humor for the day............
    Bill
    On the other hand, I still have five fingers.

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