Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Definition of terms - Stave vs Compound segment

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Rockledge, FL
    Posts
    42

    Definition of terms - Stave vs Compound segment

    What is the difference between a stave and a compound segment?

    Seems like a compound segment has both an angle and a bevel to each piece.

    If a 6"x1" has a 22.5 degree bevel on each of the long edges, it's called a stave.

    If the same piece of wood has a taper (1" on one end, 3/4" on the other), it's called a stave as well. It seems like this would be more of a compound segment/stave!

    I'm asking because I'm thinking about turning a segmented vase, and the term "stave" is used...but the segment (stave) has both an angle and a bevel to each piece.

    I'm thinking a compound tablesaw sled will meet my needs...but I would like to be sure!

    Thanks for any explanation you may be able to provide...as I'm confused...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Texas Hill Country, USA
    Posts
    1,937
    Though semi-confused after reading your question, I will try a stab at the answer.

    Generally anything that is taller than it is wide is going to be a stave. No matter how you cut the edge, it would still be a stave. If it is wider than it is tall, it would be a segment. I have never come across the term "compound segment", but could see where it could apply to a stave.

    A compound miter cut stave is made normally with one cut per side, taking into account two different angles. One is the miter cut (angle that the wood is presented to the blade) and one is the angle that the blade is tilted (bevel). The reason for the miter cut is really to save wood and make the project easier to turn. You would come out the same way if you just changed the blade angle and no miter cut, but your staves would be much thicker and you would be close to hollowing a solid piece of wood after your glue-up.

    I am sure someone will chime in that they cut staves on their grandfather's 6 HP bandsaw using an upright stave jig and homemade angle gauge, but to answer your other question, most staves are cut using a sled on the table saw.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Fort Pierce, Florida
    Posts
    2,423
    I believe the difference is grain orientation. In stave construction (think barrel or bucket construction) the grain runs vertical (end grain or spindle turning) while normal or compound segmentation the grain runs horizontal (face grain turning).
    Last edited by Thom Sturgill; 01-24-2010 at 2:17 PM. Reason: spelling
    Retired - when every day is Saturday (unless it's Sunday).

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Rockledge, FL
    Posts
    42

    Kind of what I thought

    Thanks, Robert!

    Your explanation of a stave is what I expected!

    A series of glued-up compound segments gives "rise" and expanded diameter to the completed ring, as in the base of a bowl.

    Essentially, a stave is a really TALL compound segment....

    I've turned quite a few segmented bowls and hollow forms, consisting of many segmented rings and compound segmented rings. So I'm familiar with those kinds of segments.

    The term "stave" was familiar...but not as it related to a vase's shape...narrower at the bottom and wider at the top!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Rockledge, FL
    Posts
    42

    Thanks!

    Thanks, Thom!

    That really solidifies the stave concept...grain runs top to bottom in the segment (sorry....stave!)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Chico, California
    Posts
    998
    I use the term coopered when I probably mean stave when gluing up hollow porch posts since there is usually no curve on the inside. I think of stave as being longer than it is wide or deep.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Forest, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    361
    As Thom said, the grain in a stave runs along the length. The term stave comes from the coopering trade, where barrels, kegs and buckets are made from staves. A wooden barrel or keg will usually be made from staves that are narrow at both ends and wider in the middle, which is a REALLY compound segment...

    To cut tapered and bevelled staves on the table saw will require a jig or sled that can be accurately set to "mirror" the first taper cut, since the blade on the saw can only tilt one way. I recall seeing a video of a sled that would work well for this a few years ago on the Fine Woodworking site. I cannot provide a link since accessing the site content now requires a registration or subscription.

    Good Luck!
    Bob

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Texarkana,Ar
    Posts
    43
    Quote Originally Posted by Walt Helms View Post
    Thanks, Robert!

    Your explanation of a stave is what I expected!

    A series of glued-up compound segments gives "rise" and expanded diameter to the completed ring, as in the base of a bowl.

    Essentially, a stave is a really TALL compound segment....

    I've turned quite a few segmented bowls and hollow forms, consisting of many segmented rings and compound segmented rings. So I'm familiar with those kinds of segments.

    The term "stave" was familiar...but not as it related to a vase's shape...narrower at the bottom and wider at the top!

    STAVE; A narrow strip of wood forming part of the sides of a barrel,tub,etc.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •