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Thread: Aniline Dye Source

  1. #1

    Aniline Dye Source

    Iíve been experimenting with Aniline dyes for a couple of months now and would like to find a good commercial source to purchase them in larger quantities (1/2 lb) than those offered by may of the retail woodworking shops. I asked a few of the major stain manufactures for their sources but have had no success. They seem to be very tight lipped about the subject! I wonder why?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Lewisville, NC
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    840
    Homestead Finishing sells the trandfast powder dyes in 8 oz. amounts.

    http://www.homesteadfinishingproduct...nsFastdyes.htm

    Jim

  3. #3

    Found a Source

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Tobias View Post
    Homestead Finishing sells the trandfast powder dyes in 8 oz. amounts.

    http://www.homesteadfinishingproduct...nsFastdyes.htm

    Jim
    Thanks Jim for the info. I think I found a better source. W. D. Lockwood in New York. Their website is http://www.wdlockwood.com/main.html. Does anyone have any experience with these people?

    Has

  4. #4
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    Jan 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Illi View Post
    Thanks Jim for the info. I think I found a better source. W. D. Lockwood in New York. Their website is http://www.wdlockwood.com/main.html. Does anyone have any experience with these people?

    Has
    I haven't used them but if you do let us know how you like the product. The prices are attractive.

  5. #5
    I second Van Huskey's request. Good luck.
    Doug, the Wood Loon - Acton, MA

  6. #6

    Lockwood Dyes

    I work for Lockwood, so I might be considered biased. I also love and make furniture, use the product whenever applicable, and highly recommend it as relatively inexpensive, and available in a huge range of colors and quantities. I'm going to be floating around this board a bit and can hopefully answer dye related questions (of any brand) as they pop up.

    Jesse
    Last edited by jesse ross; 03-02-2010 at 12:11 PM.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Van Huskey View Post
    I haven't used them but if you do let us know how you like the product. The prices are attractive.
    Do yourself a favor and use Lockwood as your dye source. Their product, pricing and support are excellent.

  8. #8

    Lockwood Dyes

    Thought I would report on the use of Lockwood Dyes. The company is excellent and their response time is great. They have good knowledge of the product and their quantity prices are as good as I could fine. The use of these dyes is the way to go. Color is very easily obtained with a little practice. Dyes are especially good on hardwoods that have tendency to blotch. Tinting finish coating is very easy. I recommend spray equipment to apply both dye and topcoats.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Mt. Pleasant, MI
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    2,885
    Good to have you around Jesse.

    Any experience ebonizing with dye as a base coat. I am going to do a couple picture frames and want to experiment with a couple different methods of ebonizing maple and oak.

    I'm thinking a very dark dye, followed up with a dark pigment stain.

    Joe
    For best results, try not to do anything stupid.

    Si vis pacem, para bellum - Vegetius De Rei Militari III (paraphrased)

    "So this is how liberty dies...with thunderous applause." - Padmť Amidala "Star Wars III: The Revenge of the Sith"

  10. #10
    Does anyone know whether the Lockwood dyes are lightfast?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    E. Hanover, NJ
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    374
    Lockwood Water Soluble Powders

    Excellent for deep penetration, fastness to light, and use under lacquer. They are suitable for any wood and most superior in results on hard, close grained woods, like maple, birch, etc. Any finishing material may be applied over them, as the color remains clear and free from smears under lacquer, shellac or varnish. Their great penetrating properties bring out beautiful contrasting grain effects between the soft and hard parts of the wood. Shaded and two-toned effects are obtained by varying the strength of the stain solution, by applying two coats of stain, or by manipulation of the spray gun.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Illi View Post
    Thought I would report on the use of Lockwood Dyes. The company is excellent and their response time is great. They have good knowledge of the product and their quantity prices are as good as I could fine. The use of these dyes is the way to go. Color is very easily obtained with a little practice. Dyes are especially good on hardwoods that have tendency to blotch. Tinting finish coating is very easy. I recommend spray equipment to apply both dye and topcoats.

    Thanks for reporting back! Sounds like a great source for a great product.

  13. #13

    Ebonizing

    Joe, Lockwood's Ebony Black is a good way to turn even the lightest woods jet black. A pigmented stain over top isn't necessary, but can come in handy with very open pored woods like oak and ash whose deep grains repel water, or when you wish to mute the grain a bit.

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