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Thread: Engraving a Old Gun Stock

  1. #1

    Engraving a Old Gun Stock

    So my question is
    I have an old 30/30 model 94 winchester that's been in my family for years.. It hasn't worked for probably 5 years.. Well my dad gave it to me to fix it up and get it working so he could use it to go hunting with.

    Since I have a laser engraver and I'm getting all the metal parts refinished I thought that it would be cool to engrave the stock of the gun..

    I've never done finished wood before so my question is should I sand all the finish off before I try to engrave it then refinish it or would it be ok to engrave it and just lightly sand and refinish..

    Thanks for the help in advance..

  2. #2
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    An already finished piece always seems to engrave better, it is easy to rub any residue caused by the lasering and stops charring as the laser does it's work. Because a gun stock is likely to encounter different weather conditions I would suggest a final thin top coat be done to protect the piece.

    I have seen stuff that has been done on wood and then varnished or laquered afterwards and sometimes the excess fluid 'pools' and takes away the beauty of the engraving. Which is another reason to have a final finish in mind, if it is waxing, it won't be much of a problem though.
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  3. #3
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    For what it's worth...

    Replacement stock/forend kits for Model 94's can be had fairly cheaply. Given the age of the wood/finish, you'll probably have to go all the way down to bare wood anyway. So I think before I'd (potentially) bugger up a semi-heirloom, I'd get new parts and work from there.
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  4. #4
    I actually ordered the replacement stocks which is what I'm working with, but they are already finished.. Thanks for the tips, and if anyone has any cool patterns other than the fish scale, or diamond fill in corel and would like to share then I'd be glad to use them

    Rich

  5. #5
    Here's a link to the Epilog site. http://www.epiloglaser.com/gun_stock_engraving.htm
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  6. #6
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    Be careful, you may decrease the "collectors" value of the gun if you engrave the original stock.

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    Not if the collector is the owner.

    Often the best collectibles are the ones you want to keep until you die... after that, it doesn't much matter how much it's worth.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Hintz View Post
    Not if the collector is the owner.

    Often the best collectibles are the ones you want to keep until you die... after that, it doesn't much matter how much it's worth.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Hintz View Post
    Not if the collector is the owner.

    Often the best collectibles are the ones you want to keep until you die... after that, it doesn't much matter how much it's worth.
    Exactly... I have a knife that was my dad's, a Frank Richtig, very collectible and fairly valuable ~ $2,500 or so. He paid $22.00 for it in 1942 and probably never gave it another thought, as to the value. He took it hunting when I was a kid and used it as a knife should be used. I didn't find out how much it was worth until a few years ago. Now it's in the safe. My nephew will get it when I die, hopefully he'll appreciate it's sentimental, not monetary, value.
    Last edited by Gary Hair; 03-17-2010 at 5:13 PM.
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