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Thread: Where are woodworking classes offered in Rhode Island

  1. #1

    Where are woodworking classes offered in Rhode Island

    I am looking to find out the best location to take woodworking classes in Rhode Island. I am 15, so keep that in mind(ie no $3k classes.) Taking the advice of some members, I think that I could benifit from some classes(and may help me convince the parents to let me set up a small shop.)

    I have down the key principles(ie don't cut your hand off nor drive a nail into your thumb...) but would like some instruction on construction techniques as well as hands on experience with shop equipment, to learn what I may want to invest in.

    Perferably in Northern RI. I was hoping a few of you might have some experience/suggestions.

  2. #2
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    RISD has this one:

    http://www.risd.edu/coursewin_main.c...02455&ID=18600

    Industrial Design

    ID 2455

    George Cooley Gordon

    WOOD I

    A basic course in woodworking covering material properties and joinery. Students are instructed on how to use woodworking tools and basic machinery. A series of small projects are to be built. Restricted to ID Majors, Sophomore requirement

    Semester:Spring

  3. #3
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    and this one....

    Industrial Design

    ID 2425

    George Cooley Gordon

    WOODWORKING WITH HANDTOOLS

    This exciting and physically active course will allow both the inexperienced and more advanced student to explore the active principles of how wood is worked and shaped. The first half of the course will cover the most important principles and woodworking tools. During the second half each student will develop a project of choice, based upon experience, to be completed by the end of Wintersession. The only electrically powered machine used in class will be a water wheel grinder.

    Semester:Winter
    ----
    I'd give them a call. They may have a whole program....

  4. #4
    What are ID Majors? I am still in High School(but due to taking CADII next year, I cannot take Woodshop)

    With that said, the classes would need to be evening/weekend...
    Last edited by Brendan Plavis; 04-10-2010 at 10:12 PM.

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  6. #6
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    ID is industrial Design, and if I have read the course book correctly those courses are restricted to ID majors of sophomore status minimum enrolled at RISD, but they may make exceptions for passionate students, or they may not?

    There is a school in CT, CT Valley School of Woodworking, that could be reached from northern RI and offers both night and weekend classes as well as summer classes, though your parents would have a heck of a drive. They also offer week long summer classes. Have you looked into any summer programs? Might fit into a students schedule better?

  7. #7
    I work during the summer all day every day... where do you think I get my computer/woodworking funds....

    Not to mention it says that students must be 18 or older... #$%%

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brendan Plavis View Post
    I work during the summer all day every day... where do you think I get my computer/woodworking funds....

    Not to mention it says that students must be 18 or older... #$%%
    I'd still call them.

    First, the 18/older thing may be something for which they make exceptions.

    2nd, it may be something you can do in a year or two, if/when your situation changes;

    3rd, they must have other recommendations, for your area.

  9. #9
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    Probably the biggest woodworking education I had in my life was from Tage Frid, who was a professor at RISD. I never met the man, but his books were my bible for a while. I highly recommend them for anybody learning woodworking. In addition to being very good, they're quite affordable (good for you), and you can read them on your own schedule (again good for you).

    http://www.amazon.com/Tage-Teaches-W...0959663&sr=8-1

  10. #10
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    Smile Woodcraft

    A quick google search reveals 21 classes at the woodcraft in Providence between now and August. Quite a few sound good. I'd Also check with them and find a local club. . .

  11. #11
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    Agree with Woodcraft.

    I used to go there when I was spending time in MA. Good folks, they may have some suggestions.

  12. #12
    Brendan,
    I learn a lot about designing/making by studying precedents, watching others work and reading/looking at books and magazines.

    The desk you've started is something, but you have a LOT to learn about fundamental construction techniques, hand and machine skills and design. Get to your local library and check out a few woodworking books, magazines and DVD's at a time. Check out videos at http://thewoodwhisperer.com/ and similar websites. Check your TV listings for The New Yankee Workshop, The Woodwright's Shop and similar programs. Look for some inexpensive old pieces of furniture (pre-1930's) at yard sales or thrift stores: take them apart (carefully) to learn how they were built then restore them.

    Get a few decent used hand tools (chisels, back saw, smoother plane, block plane) and a workbench (a most important tool!). Learn how to use and tune-up the tools, then start with small projects like boxes or side tables. Stop by a local cabinet or furniture shop and ask them if they sell or donate scraps or "shorts". Sell the small things you make and restore to friends, relatives and neighbors and reinvest the proceeds in more tools and additional stock.

    The Furniture Society is having their annual conference in Boston June 16-18. This event is a unique opportunity to rub shoulders with preeminent craftspersons. The Society offers passes for assistants who are in furniture programs, you could see if they still need people, maybe they'll make an exception.
    http://www.furnituresociety.org/furn...age=assistants

    Perhaps you can find a mentor or some references through the Woodworkers Guild of RI.
    http://www.wwgri.org/Start.htm

    It looks like the Community Education program at CCRI offers some woodworking classes to non-degree seeking students. Unfortunately it appears they are not offered this summer.
    http://www.ccri.edu/cwce/personal/
    http://www.ccri.edu/cwce/pdfs/CWCEspring10.pdf
    http://www.ccri.edu/cwce/pdfs/CWCEsummer2010.pdf
    Woodworking I
    You’ll learn about the basics of woodworking and how to operate machinery such as bench and radial arm saws, routers, shapers and planers. And we’ll cover home repair skills - projects you can do yourself - in this basic woodworking course. A $10 materials fee (check or money order) is due the first night of class made payable to Davies.

    Woodworking II
    After gaining your initial experience with basic tools and materials in Basic Woodworking I, you can move to this class which stresses advanced use of tools and materials in a project-oriented curriculum. Your instructor will teach and coach you through a step-by-step process to reach your personal goals, and you will learn more home repair secrets. Materials not included.

    Woodworking: Advanced Course
    This course is designed for completers of Woodworking I and II and anyone who wants to further develop their woodworking skills. Under the guidance of a certified instructor, you will learn advanced skills in constructing small projects or continue to work on unfinished projects in class or at home. Enjoy a hands-on experience in a comfortable, relaxed adult environment. Basic woodworking skills are required for this course. Materials not included.



    Here is a good list of woodworking schools/classes nationwide.
    http://www.woodworking-news.com/wood..._schools.shtml
    Last edited by Kevin Groenke; 04-11-2010 at 7:07 PM.

  13. #13
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    I would get involved with a local club, they often have very inexpensive (or free) evening classes. Your next option would be WWing store or community college classes. RISD is considered to be one of the top design schools in the country (and is over your $3k budget). It may be a great college option for you if you want to do WWing as a career.

  14. #14
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    Concur with looking into classes at Woodcraft. They have some beginning WWing classes that would be helpful.

    2nd the idea of finding a mentor or some guy in the neighborhood that has a shop where you can hang around a bit and ask questions. The idea of going though the Guild is good.

    Joining the local WWing club could provide you a mentor.

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