Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: HVLP for latex paint?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles, Calif.
    Posts
    2,005

    HVLP for latex paint?

    I want to get a turbine-type (no compressor) HVLP sprayer, but want something that will let me apply both clear finishes and latex paint.

    Any problems using one machine for both? I'm worried about little paint chunks getting into my clear finishes, even if I clean the bejeezus out of the thing after using paint.

    Jason

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Hood Canal, Washington
    Posts
    1,020
    Hi Jason

    You can spray latex paints with HVLP, but it is less than ideal. You will have to thin the paint significantly (like 20-25%). This results in paint which wants to run and drip on vertical surfaces. Latex/acrylic paint also has fairly tightly contolled chemistry and may not dry correctly if thinned that much. You might get lucky one time, then have a surface which remains permanently soft and tacky the next time.

    If you're thinking of painting furniture, an oil based paint like Satin Impervo will give much better results with HVLP. You can thin it all you want and it will dry nice and hard. If you're painting walls, rent an airless sprayer. Airless is designed for latex and will let you spray it undiluted.

    As an aside, I gave away my entry level HVLP (Rockler) and replaced it with a mid-sized compressor from craigslist. I bought several inexpensive LVLP sprayers, which are cheap and work much better IMO. I have dedicated sprayers for shellac, oil based and WB clear.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    La Plata, Maryland
    Posts
    199
    I've been spraying water base paint and water base poly for years now with my Accuspray 23K HVLP. It does a fantastic job. It's a little pricey ($750) but you get what you pay for. Using a lacquer nozzle, I just recently started spraying Target water base lacquer. Works like a charm!
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Larry, AKA Uncle Fester

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Southern Minnesota
    Posts
    1,442
    Jason,

    I have tried it with my gun it works but as mentioned above you need to thin it considerably and then it works ok. I used my gun to spray the celings of a couple of rooms in our house. For celings it did ok but I dont think I would want to do walls with that set up. It can be done but you need a gun designed for it, most air guns are designed for thinner finishes. I have a friend that was a house painter, interior. He used a $1000 electric machine that just sat above a 5 gallon bucket of paint. That machine was designed for think paint and it worked well.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Chandler, Arizona
    Posts
    203
    I use my hvlp rig to spray latex paint on entry doors all the time. They work great. No problems with paint in my clear finishes. I don't even clean my gun that good most of the time.

    Azcraig

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwestern Connecticut
    Posts
    6,190
    Quote Originally Posted by Craig McCormick View Post
    I use my hvlp rig to spray latex paint on entry doors all the time. They work great. No problems with paint in my clear finishes. I don't even clean my gun that good most of the time.

    Azcraig
    Craig, what tip size are you using, how much are you thinning and with what?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Tx.
    Posts
    1,335
    It's not recommended, Peter. You really break down the paint by thinning it so much. You'll need several coats if you do. This is discussed on the "Finish" side of the forum all the time. For spraying latex, an airless was invented.
    Phil in Big D
    The only difference between a taxidermist and the taxman, is that the taxidermist leaves the skin. Mark Twain

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Shoreline, CT
    Posts
    2,622
    Hard for HVLPs to spray "latex paint", but the ONLY thing that should ever receive "latex paint" is a wall. For furniture--and trim--you want a 100% acyrlic waterborne finish. In paint stores these are made with high visocity to make brushing and rolling easier and neater. But acyrilic waterbornes are available in versions are are ideal for spraying , though not at your big boxes or run of the mill paint stores, with HVLP sprayers. Products from Target or Enduro are examples. See www.homesteadfinishingproducts.com for one source.

  9. #9
    The standard nozzle set that's usually supplied with a turbine system, assuming you get just one nozzle setup is for clear finishes. To spray latex through 3 and 4 stage turbines you should use a 1.8mm-2.0mm nozzle setup. When using this size, you only need about 3-4 oz water per quart which is around 10%. I've never had to go past 15% tinning per quart which is 5 oz.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •