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Thread: Rubber feet on a cutting board

  1. #1

    Rubber feet on a cutting board

    So I was watching the newest episode of The Wood Whisperer yesterday and decided to build one of his cutting boards. His split because water got trapped under it and it made me think, Why can't I put small rubber feet on the bottom of the board at the corners to keep it up off the counter and let it dry out evenly. The only thing I can come up with is that it might warp in the middle since it isn't being supported but I could always just put a rubber foot in the middle also. What do you guys think?
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    Last edited by keith micinski; 08-03-2010 at 7:28 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Rubber feet on the corners are fine. IMHO one in the center will have no effect on warping.
    ________
    Ron

    "Individual commitment to a group effort--that is what makes a team work, a company work, a society work, a civilization work."
    Vince Lombardi

  3. #3
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    Get the self sticking plastic buttons. I've been using them for years. They only lift the board about 1/8 inch and, if the board has some weight, they don't slide around (I can't believe I'm actually giving you some advice, you saw stealer you)!!!

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by keith micinski View Post
    to keep it up off the counter and let it dry out evenly.
    Fine idea but I rather suspect that humidity trapped under it will still cause warping - though maybe less of it.

    I made a hot plate board some years ago from maple and mahog. It was long half inch strips with short 3" strips of mahog at the ends and in the middle.
    Pretty I thought. Lots of open space between the wood strips
    It traps and takes on moisture and warps anyway.


    One thing about end grain boards I have always wondered at is durability.
    The old school butcher's blocks were feet thick and bolted together. Modern end grain blocks are not so thick nor bolted together and of course being end grain are presenting the most inopportune side (end grain) to all the humidity. I've never made one, but I've wondered at this.

  5. #5
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    I've gotta agree with the other folks here. Short plastic or rubber feet (might are always about 3/16" high) will virtually eliminate slipping and moisture absorption. I've used these on end grain boards for nearly 10 years and the boards are still going strong.

    If you're new to end grain boards I would strongly suggest that some sort of finish be used to seal the end grain on both sides of the board. I use Waterlox, two coats, and it works well. An occasional rubdown with mineral oil keeps them looking good and shedding water.

    Have fun with your project.

    Doug

  6. #6
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    Many chefs use a non-slip pad under cutting boards like a piece of rubber shelf liner. I always use one and part of my post cutting ritual is to take care of my knives (like anyone with a decent knife should) and I just take care of the board at the same time, clean and wipe it down. I store my cutting boards on edge but if you leave them out water migration from the counter shouldn't be a big issue if you attach some feet, there shouldn't be any water left on the underside of the board from cutting if you take proper care of it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Hmmm....looks vaguely familiar:

    CIMG2809.jpg

    I built these in 2008 and I put the little rubber stick-on feet on each corner. So far, I haven't seen nor heard of any problems. Durability has been good as well.

  8. #8
    I am going to go with the little rubber feet then. I am using the General finishes Salad Bowl finish thinned out with 50 percent mineral spirits like Mark uses in the Video. That picture already has one coat on it. I am going to put one more on it then sand it with 400 grit and apply a final coat.

  9. #9
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    My cutting board is quite large 24 X 24 and stays at its position. I do clean up under it regularly, but it has been in place for 5+ years and has never warped. One should always take care of knives and boards when used. Those of us who consider ourselves excellent cooks and woodworkers too are sure to do this.

  10. #10
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    I've made 7 or 8 over the years with oldest being about 6 years old. I screwed good rubber feet to each corner and to my knowledge, they are all holding up well.

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    I use the rubber ones about an inch in diameter that have a metal washer embedded in them to hold the screw tightly.

    They look professional and will not fall off if the adhesive refuses to bond to the oil or wax.

    Dan

  12. #12
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    I always put rubber feet on all boards I have made (easy to take them up and they don't slip on the counters):
    cb3.JPGebay2.JPGcb4.JPG

  13. #13
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    I usually finish my boards with mineral oil, and find that eventually it dissolves the adhesive on the self stick rubber feet. The screw on ones are fine though. The other alternative is a small wooden plug or dowel.

  14. #14
    Join Date
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    My wife has a solid surface countertop material cutting board she loves. It has vinyl rubber-like pads on each corner. Without them, that thing will slide off the counter top. I found replacement clear vinyl pads at my local Ace hardware. They aren't expensive.
    Ken

  15. #15
    Join Date
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    Pittsford, NY
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    I started adding wooden and rubber feet to my cutting boards. I basically took a 1"x1" piece of stock, rounded over all four edges . . . then I just take " slices off.

    I just go with gluing them to the board. I thought about putting a screw in there, but they seemed to hold fairly well. Then I put the round anti skid sticky pads that you can get at any hardware store.

    I liked the added height to be able to get your finders underneath.

    -Brian
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