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Thread: Where to get rip chains?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Where to get rip chains?

    So, with a fellow Creeker over this past weekend, I realized that I need a rip chain for my chainsaw. I stopped by my local Stihl dealer asking for a rip chain. They looked at me like I had 3 heads! I explained what I meant. They called the manager over. I explained to him what I wanted. He said, not only "we don't carry them, and I Stihl doesn't make them", but also " you don't want to use your FarmBoss for that. You'll burn up the saw." I tried to explain that I'm not trying to cut up 10' logs on endgrain. I'm cutting 14 to 19" logs along the grain. ......... Blank stare. "Nope, Stihl doesn't make that."

    Hmmmmm, Tony had one on his Stihl. I've heard numberous people here talk about 'em.

    Where do you all get your rip chains? Or do you just take regular chains and file them at different angles?
    I drink, therefore I am.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Lafayette, IN
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    Usually a rip chain is also called a "skip-tooth" chain. And, yes, you can make your own by grinding off every other tooth on each side of the chain.

    If you're not doing a lot of ripping, it's probably not worth it. Just tilting the saw slightly will keep it from producing the long, clogging shavings. It also helps to get the log off the ground a little bit so that your saw can eject the shavings without plugging the chute.

    On edit: This may not be the exact chain you need, but it's a site and a start:

    http://www.baileysonline.com/itemdet...m=WP375%2033RP
    Last edited by Jason Roehl; 08-31-2010 at 6:02 PM.
    Jason

    "Don't get stuck on stupid." --Lt. Gen. Russel Honore


  3. #3
    Mike, I am very surprised that your dealer said that. My dealer sold me one when I bought my saw, a 260 Pro. There is a different color link cover to identify it. You will notice in the picture that the chain boxes are colored green and the other is yellow. I can't remember which is which but check another dealer. I use my rip all the time with no harm to my saw.
    Success is the sum of Failure and Learning

  4. #4
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    Feb 2007
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    Front Royal, Va.
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    Mike, I'll go to the outbuilding tomorrow and get the chain number off of the label I kept.

    Oh, and then I'll send it to you.

    Tony
    Tony

    "Soldier On"

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    My Stihl dealer said he'd be glad to get them for me, but that the don't regularly carry them or rerecommend them because they tend to break too often and too easily. Dunno if that was made up BS or true, but FWIW there's another county in the state of Stihl heard from.
    Last edited by Sean Hughto; 08-31-2010 at 8:55 PM.

  6. #6
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    Thanks, Tony, I'd appreciate it.

    Sean, sorry, don't know if it was the beer I just had or what, but I didn't quite follow your post. Please splain, if you have a dealer or something that is actually willing to order it, that would be awesome.

    Does this mean that most of you don't really use rip chains? Do you just use regular ones?
    I drink, therefore I am.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    Southern Maryland
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    Try these

    Baileys or Norwalk Power Supply both have them.

  8. #8
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    Jan 2008
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    Chicago Heights, Il.
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    I've ripped a lot of blanks with my 028 and did them with the safety chain that comes with the saw. I imagine a rip chain would be quicker, but I have never experience kick back and feel the I would rather cut a little slower but be safer.

  9. #9
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    Jan 2008
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    Bangor, PA
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    Mike,
    Are you trying to rip with the log standing on end or laying it down and sawing through the side. It makes a big difference. Ripping with the log on its side is quicker. It also helps if you rock the saw occasionally to help clear chips. You may not need a rip chain, even though they are available.

  10. #10
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    The latter, laying down and cutting through the side, not standing up. It was my impression that you kinda need (or at least it is way more efficient) to use a rip chain for this rather than a standard chain.

    If the general concensus is that most people don't use them (because of a lack of need, not because they don't want to spend the money) then I don't want to try to get something I don't need. But if the proper way to do it is to use a rip chain because it is faster (and still safe) then I'd like to get one.

    Darryl, I'll give them a looksee. Thanks.
    I drink, therefore I am.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Cornell,MI
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    Dealers told me that a rip chain is only available for the larger saws that take a 3/8" chain. My dealer recommended a full chisel chain. It's what we have been using for years to rip freehand craft lumber small enough for the bandsaw and works well for ripping bowl blanks.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Orleans, Cape Cod, Ma.
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    Rip chains are available, but not required to cut our turning blanks. I have owned and used dozens of chain saws over 45 years of construction and land clearing, but I don't propose to be an authority or expert, only experienced. However, cutting with the grain, log on its' side works okay with a standard "safety" chain (yellow, anti-kickback). A less safe but much better option is the non-anti kickback chain, with the green label (warning!). Chain saws are right up there with table saws as far as safety issues. They are both inherently dangerous. Use firm footing, proper balance, stay behind the saw, elevated work surface if possible, and no reaching.... to name a few tips. Proper maintenance will help a lot, and sharp "blades/chain" made for the task are vital. A standard non anti-kickback chisel tooth chain works great, but is dangerous when cutting near the tip of the bar. Below is just one of many links regarding chains.
    A very good link is: http://www.sawmillchainsaws.com/sawchains.htm
    Chainsaw Chain Types

    By: Gene Rodriguez, IIIThere are a number of chainsaw chain types, each designed for specific jobs or groups of chainsaw users. Pairing the right chainsaw chain type with the particular job is the best way to saw efficiently and lower the risk of injury or damage to the chainsaw.
    Know Your Chainsaw Chain Types

    • Low-Kickback - Low-kickback chains are designed to meet the government safety standards for kickback prevention when using a chainsaw. In The US, low-kickback chainsaw chains must meet or exceed ANSI standard ANSI B175.1. In Canada, low-kickback chains must meet or exceed the CSA Z62.3 standard. Low-kickback chains are a good choice for home use or light professional duty use.
    • Professional - Professional chainsaw chains are designed for durability and comfort when used over long periods of time. Professional chainsaw chains typically cut faster than other chains, requiring specialized training for safe use. Professional chainsaw chains come in number of "pitches" designed to fit chainsaw bars of different size. The available pitches for professional chainsaw chains are 0.325, 0.375 and 0.404.
    • Narrow Kerf - Narrow kerf chainsaw chains are narrower than standard chains. This narrow profile leaves a smaller channel (called a kerf) in the wood. Narrow kerf chainsaw chains are typically used on low powered chainsaws intended for light duty use.
    • Ripping - While most chainsaw chains are designed to cut perpendicular to the grain of the wood, ripping chainsaw chains are designed to cut parallel to the grain of the wood. This design feature makes ripping chains particularly useful when cutting boards from felled trees while using a chainsaw mill or similar attachment.
    • Self-Sharpening - Self-sharpening chainsaw chains are intended for use with chainsaws that have a self-sharpening feature. These types of saws are useful for cutting in abrasive conditions or by users who are not comfortable sharpening their own blades.

  13. #13
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    Mar 2009
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    Orleans, Cape Cod, Ma.
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    Sorry, but I believe that I mixed up the label colors for saw chain. Yellow is usually used for the more aggressive styles and green or blue is used for the "safer", less aggressive consumer saw chains. I have read that saws with a 3.8 c.i. engine or smaller must be sold with safety chain. After that, we are on our own.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Mason Michigan
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    I used to buy ripping chains from Granberg but now I just buy skip tooth chains from my Stihl dealer.
    A few hours south of Steve Schlumpf

  15. #15
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    Mar 2009
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    Chevy Chase, Maryland
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    My Stihl dealer said he doesn't like to sell "rip" chains because they break too easily, i.e., are dangerous and cause customer complaints.

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