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Thread: Phenolic veneer sheet

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Courtice, Ontario Greater Toronto Area
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    Phenolic veneer sheet

    Hello,

    Anyone know of a phenolic or similiar product in sheet form that can be properly glued to wood like a veneer. 1/16" or less..

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    You might look for a high-pressure laminate (aka formica) usually called cabinet liner. It is a thin laminate intended for use on the inside of cabinets and door panels. Glue with yellow glue in a vacuum press. I just measured a piece as .020" thick.

    Or if thin is more important than material, you could use sheet steel. You can easily find it in fairly thin sheets. The big-box stores carry it in small-area pieces. I've expoxied it to plywood in a vacuum press, and it has stayed stuck for a decade. I use West System epoxy.
    Last edited by Jamie Buxton; 12-05-2010 at 11:36 AM.

  3. #3
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    I forget to mention one key thing. I need to apply the phenolic sheet over plywood and then wood veneer over the phenolic.

    Thanks, Joel

  4. #4
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    I don't know how phenolic resin is formed and adheres to substrates, but I can tell you this common woodworking glues won't work. I bought a sheet of phenolic faced 3/4 ply a year or so ago and made shop fixtures with it...just like the FWW article suggested. My, now dedicated, out-feed table for the table saw was the largest. Until I had my bench I used the phenolic surface more generally and dried glue just pops right off it.

    You might consider getting some of the faced plywood for you application instead of trying to work with the very thin layers.

  5. #5
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    High pressure laminate (aka formica) is made from paper impregnated with phenolic resin, so it should meet your spec.

    Gluing formica to plywood is straightforward. Yellow glue bonds to the back face. However, gluing that wood veneer to the front may take some experimenting. Yellow glue just pops off the front of formica. I've never figured out what the formica manufacturers do to make the front face glue-impervious, but the back face glue-friendly. I suspect they've sanded the back face so there isn't a skin of phenolic resin on it, and the glue can grab the paper. You can try that on the front face, and see if it works.

  6. #6
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    Well, there is this stuff -- http://www.tapeease.com/DuraBack%20Phenolic.htm -- "phenolic-backed wood veneer." I've never used it. It is pricy, but it just might do both of your layers.

    What, pray tell, are you doing with these layers?

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Courtice, Ontario Greater Toronto Area
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    the phenolic backed veneer is exactly what I'm aiming for in its hiding quality

    Building loudspeaker cabinets with dados and end grain is exposed.
    Need to apply sheet material to cover end grain before veneering so grain wont show through veneer.

    Love price and selection of raw veneer along with ability to create(ie book match) many grain patterns over the backed veneers.
    I could use 1/8 mdf but hoping for something thinner and more rigid

    thanks, Joel

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Joel Wesseling View Post
    Need to apply sheet material to cover end grain before veneering so grain wont show through veneer.

    thanks, Joel
    Joel it sounds like the tail might be wagging the dog. If end grain is causing you problems, then perhaps it would be easier to miter your joints and avoid the end grain and all the complex work arounds.

    Have a look at one of the veneer books and see the various ways that have been proven to work in dealing with corners. One of the more conventional methods would probably be cheaper, easier, and more reliable.

    I know in gluing to melamine that the joint is not as strong as wood to wood, and suspect the phenolic would be similar. If you absolutely have to use the phenolic sheet, I would try using Unibond 800 glue. I have read it bonds well to phenolic. Spread it evenly, and leave it clamped for the full cure. It has a minimum temperature to cure, and will outgas formaldehide while curing so choose your location carefully.

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