Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: How I Changed Jet 1642 Bearing

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Sandia Park, NM
    Posts
    1,068

    How I Changed Jet 1642 Bearing

    Tools Needed:

    1/8” Allen Key
    3/16” Allen Key
    5/32” Allen Key
    4mm Allen Key
    ˝” socket
    Bonker of some ilk
    Dowl
    New Triple Sealed Nachi Bearings Kit #9706 and 9708 from VXB(on right)

    Tools.jpg
    Bearings.jpg

    Removal:
    1. Unplug the lathe.
    2. Loosen the 2ea 4mm set screws in hand wheel, then unscrew hand wheel.
    Hand Wheel.jpg
    3. Loosen the 3/16” screw in clamping nut on back of headstock
    Clamping Nut.jpg
    4. Raise the motor up to loosen tension on the belt, and tighten in place.
    5. Open access door. Remove belt off of lower motor pulley.
    6. Loosen the 2ea 5/32” set screws in the upper shaft pulley. Screws are 180 degrees out from each other
    Upper Drive Pully.jpg
    Last edited by Nate Davey; 12-27-2010 at 9:07 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Sandia Park, NM
    Posts
    1,068
    7. If you can reach it, loosen the setscrew in the locking collar, if not able, wait until step 10.

    8. Remove the 4ea 1/8” outer corner screws holding the LCD panel in. Gently pull the panel out and let it hang in front of the on/off switch. This gives you some needed room and protects the sensor.

    9. Now you want to get a wooden dowel or a wood square piece (pen blank size) that is just smaller than the hand wheel side of the spindle shaft.

    10. Place dowel at the hand wheel end of the spindle shaft and tap with a dead blow hammer or wooden mallet to force the spindle out the work side. You want to tap it until the end of the shaft is inside the headstock clear of the bearing. NOTE: If you weren’t able to loosen the setscrew in the locking collar, now is the time to do so.
    Control Panel.jpg

    11. At this point you should be able to pull from the work side of the shaft. You want to slowly pull the shaft out, but at the same time remove the locking collar and pulley and locking key on the inside of the headstock.

    12. Once you have the collar and pulley off the shaft, pull the shaft completely out.

    13. Remove the rear bearing being careful not to loose the wave washer behind it.
    Wave Washer.jpg
    14. Now remove the 4ea ˝” bolts from the shaft.
    Shaft.jpg

    15. If you were lucky like me, the front pulley started to slide down the shaft as I banged it out. If not you will need to get it started down the shaft. A bearing splitter would be the easiest way, but you may find a flat head screwdriver with a few taps will work as well.

    Reinstallation:
    (Not pictured as it is the opposite of Removal)
    1. Slide new front bearing down the shaft. It’s going to be tight at the bottom; here a bearing press would come in handy. I just set my bench vice too slightly over the shaft diameter, and set the bearing down on top of it (bearing already started on the shaft). Then I place a block of wood at the work end and tap gently to set it home against the flange. Using the ways of the lather is also on option.
    Ways.jpg

    2. Now reinsert the 4ea ˝” bolts and tighten till they are snug.

    3. Insert the handle end back into the headstock and slide the locking key, pulley and lock collar back on. Don’t worry about setting the screws on them just yet.
    Locking Key.jpg

    4. Now slip the belt over the shaft and pass the handle end though the motor side of the headstock.

    5. Place the wave washer on, and then the rear bearing. If you need to tap the bearing a bit, just make sure you didn’t push the front one back out.

    6. Before putting the clamping nut back on, line up the locking collar and tighten down the set screw. If needed, you can get it in place, make a mark for reference and back the shaft back out a tad so you can reach the set screw.

    7. With the shaft fully inserted from the work side, thread the locking clamp back on hand tight and then back off about a 1⁄4 of a turn. Tighten the clamp screw.

    8. Thread the hand wheel back on and tighten the 2 set screws.

    9. Now Place the belt on the high position on both pulleys. Take up slack in belt. Belt should be at a 90o angle to both pulleys and then tighten
    2ea 5/32” set screws on the shaft pulley.

    10. Carefully place the LCD panel back in and tighten the 4ea 1/8” screws. I found if I didn’t tighten them fairly snug the sensor did not function properly.

    11. Plug lathe in and start turning again!
    Last edited by Nate Davey; 12-27-2010 at 9:09 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Manistique, Michigan
    Posts
    1,039
    Excellent step by step procedure. Thank you for taking the time to document it.
    Rich Aldrich (The Yooper)

    65 miles SE of Steve Schlumpf.

    "To a pessimist, the glass is half empty; to an optimist, the glass is half full; to an engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be." Unknown author



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Eureka, Mo.
    Posts
    2,363
    VERY informative and nicely done. Thanks Nate!.Bill.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Columbia, MD
    Posts
    11,020
    Blog Entries
    1
    I never saw this answered in your other thread... why did you replace the bearings?
    Hi-Tec Designs, LLC -- Owner (and self-proclaimed LED guru )

    Trotec 80W Speedy 300 laser w/everything
    CAMaster Stinger CNC (25" x 36" x 5")
    USCutter 24" LaserPoint Vinyl Cutter
    Jet JWBS-18QT-3 18", 3HP bandsaw
    Robust Beauty 25"x52" wood lathe w/everything
    Jet BD-920W 9"x20" metal lathe
    Delta 18-900L 18" drill press

    Flame Polisher (ooooh, FIRE!)
    Freeware: InkScape, Paint.NET, DoubleCAD XT
    Paidware: Wacom Intuos4 (Large), CorelDRAW X5

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Sandia Park, NM
    Posts
    1,068
    Dan,

    The factory bearing are not sealed and usually the first thing to go, per my conversation with other Jet owners. Ounce of prevention I guess you could say.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Nate Davey View Post
    Dan,

    The factory bearing are not sealed and usually the first thing to go, per my conversation with other Jet owners.

    So how long does it take for them to go out?
    CarveWright Model C
    Jet 1642 EVS, Jet 1014
    Half-a-Brain

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Columbia, MD
    Posts
    11,020
    Blog Entries
    1
    Ah, preventative maintenance, so to speak. My 1642 is still in pieces on the floor, so I'll consider stuffing this bit of info away for when the day comes...
    Hi-Tec Designs, LLC -- Owner (and self-proclaimed LED guru )

    Trotec 80W Speedy 300 laser w/everything
    CAMaster Stinger CNC (25" x 36" x 5")
    USCutter 24" LaserPoint Vinyl Cutter
    Jet JWBS-18QT-3 18", 3HP bandsaw
    Robust Beauty 25"x52" wood lathe w/everything
    Jet BD-920W 9"x20" metal lathe
    Delta 18-900L 18" drill press

    Flame Polisher (ooooh, FIRE!)
    Freeware: InkScape, Paint.NET, DoubleCAD XT
    Paidware: Wacom Intuos4 (Large), CorelDRAW X5

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Sandia Park, NM
    Posts
    1,068
    I was starting to hear a knock so went ahead and took care of it while I was waiting for a few projects to dry. I don't use my lathe heavily but, as I said, I had a little time so upgraded the bearings

  10. #10
    So how old is your lathe?
    CarveWright Model C
    Jet 1642 EVS, Jet 1014
    Half-a-Brain

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Sandia Park, NM
    Posts
    1,068
    I've had it for 1.5 years.

  12. #12
    Nate - thanks for taking the time to put together the tutorial! I hope I don't ever have to replace the bearings but it is nice to know it can be done!
    Steve

    “You never know what you got til it's gone!”
    Please don’t let that happen!
    Become a financial Contributor today!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •