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Thread: Restoring Stanley #190 Hand plane

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rockville, MD
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    Restoring Stanley #190 Hand plane

    I'm just getting around to restoring a Stanley #190 Hand plane which I inherited from my father-in-law. Wonderful man, Swedish cabinet maker. In doing some research, I've noticed it's missing a small piece, a depth setting device which is screwed into place, obviously to keep the blade at a consistent depth. I'm including two photos of my hand plane and one which I found which had the depth setting device. My question is: 1)probably impossible to come up with that part, but if not, how would I? 2) couldn't I just make something that I could screw into the hand plane that would be comparable to accomplish the same task? Thanks for any comments and suggestions.

    Don M
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  2. #2
    This stop is commonly missing from #190's, #78's and the other fillestar planes that Stanely produced. Thankfully though you're in luck, they are really not difficult to find.

    I did a quick search on ebay and found at least 5 of them right now up for sale or by it now around $10, which might be a tad high, but if you just want the piece and the thumb screw so you can finish the restoration it might be worth it to you.

    http://shop.ebay.com/?_from=R40&_trk...All-Categories

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Sebastopol, California
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    1,579
    As Jeremy indicates, these stops are pretty well interchangeable among the various similar planes that Stanley produced (180-182, 190-192, 78, 289). Besides deBay, you can no doubt get one from some of the online parts sellers. I've had good experiences with Walt Quadrato of Brass City Records and Tools (call him, don't e-mail him), Clarence Blanchard of Fine Tool Journal (e-mail fine), and Pete Niederberger (e-mail also fine. His prices are, generally, a little higher, but he's got darned near everything). Google will bring you contact information.

    Comments:
    1. The fastening screws for these came in two versions: a thumbscrew and, later, a screw with a big slotted head, knurled around the edge. Get the thumbscrew if you can; my experience is it works better (and doesn't require a tool, other than your thumb and one finger). The screw size/pitch is another one of those Stanley pre-standardized sizes.
    2. The screws don't come with a washer, but I find one under the head helpful. Best, if you can find one that fits, is a spring lock washer (also known as wavy washer). My hardware store and auto parts store carry them, but in metric sizes only; I just find one that fits. The outer diameter of these is sometimes too small to fit well, so you may need a thin flat washer too. The spring washer will let you get it tight enough to drag, loose enough to nudge into final depth. It also helps hold the depth when you tighten up*.
    3. Later stops often come glopped up with enough paint to cover a rock band tour bus (wrong color for schoolbus). This interferes with function; wire brush or sand it to a thin layer. It's OK if you get to shiny metal.

    *It can be very depressing to have it lose position in the middle of a long planing session, where you're trying to do one or more rabbets to a specific depth. I can testify to how depressing it can be.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rockville, MD
    Posts
    1,100
    Thanks guys, with help like this, the restoration should be a snap and I'll have another of Dad's hand planes to use and remember him when I do.

    Don M

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