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Thread: Sandeply Plywood

  1. #1
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    Sandeply Plywood

    I was in the Depot today picking up a 11/32 drill bit and a new 40 tooth circular blade to fine tune my new Easy Smart with. It was raining, not a good time to be moving sheet materials but I decided to check out what they had anyway.

    I found this nice looking 1/2 and 3/4" plywood called Sandeply. It has a similar appearance to Birch Plywood. The HD guy at the construction desk claimed it was stainable and a good material for cabinets. The finish looks better than the Birch Ply I am use to seeing. The 1/2' is 7 ply and I believe the 3/4 is 9 ply. The price is very reasonable, about what good MDF costs.

    I am wondering if anyone here has used this to make cabinets with? I need a cabinets in my shop ASAP and I am wondering if this might be a suitable material?

  2. #2
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    I've used it for jigs and such and it'll do well for shop cabinets.

    BUT, Take note of the weight. If it feels lighter than any other plywood you'll find it doesn't hold screws well as it'd kinds soft. You may also find the thickness varies from batch to batch, i've seen ~.025 variation.

    Brian
    The significant problems we encounter cannot be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them.

    Never let your fears decide your fate

  3. #3
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    I have used it. Very much like appleply, which has a soft maple skin most of the time. It would be great for shop cabinets but I like the birch ply for good paint grade work, (is that an oxi-moron?). I think the birch machines cleaner and has a harder surface. Just my $.02.

  4. #4
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    Alpharetta GA ( Metro Atlanta GA )
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    I used Sandeply on my shop projects. It is half the cost of real birch, 7ply and I found very few problems with voids.

    My table saw base was done with Sandeply, HD poplar and 1/2" birch for the drawer fronts.



    This is the first real project I have completed that is finished and somewhat resembles a cabinet. I learned a lot !!!!!



    Here is a shot of the underside. You can see the sandeply sides to the boxes.



    A shot of one of the drawers. Thanks to Mark Singer for the idea to use pocket hole screws to assemble the drawers. They are really sturdy. I learned from Mark's last large post the the Pocket holes really should go on the front and back NOT the side panels. But that was part of the hugh learning process I went thru on this project.

    I think I would have been much happier using a gel stain instead of a the pentrating stain that I used.
    Bartee Lamar

  5. #5
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    Western Ma.
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    From Sandeply.com's web pages...

    Question...The Home Depot in <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-comffice:smarttags" /><st1lace><st1:City>harrisburg</st1:City>, <st1:State>PA</st1:State></st1lace> carries 4X8 sheets of 3/4" sandeply plywood. It's marked B/C. I am considering using this plywood for kitchen cabinet covers, however, I noticed that there are small voids in the inner layers (including the layer just below the exterior veneer layer).
    Could you tell me if this product is appropriate for cabinet construction. Do these voids pose a potential problem with denting, etc.
    Thanks


    Reply...
    The product standard for hardwood plywood permits small openings directly under the face due to the very nature of the raw material, but the voids do not usually present a problem. Sande plywood can be used for finished cabinets, although it can be tricky to stain and top coat. A wash coat of sealer thinned about one part sealer to 4 parts solvent applied to the surface, allowed to dry completely, then thoroughly sanded prior to staining would be advisable. (Try this on a scrap piece first to get the hang of it.) You may want to check out their birch plywood as well. Also, if the voids in the veneer core are a real worry, you may want to look at the MDF core birch plywood panels. Best of luck!

  6. #6
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    Great information, thanks! I suspected it was not as good as a "real" hardwood plywood but the piece I had the chance to inspect looked pretty good. Sounds like it should work for my intended use. Like Bartee, I need a saw support, cabinet, so maybe I will try a few sheets of it for that project.

  7. #7
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    I used SandeePly for the uppers in my shop and for the drawer boxes in my lowers and roll-around carts. It's commonly used as substrate for veneer in commercial shops where I worked. I've used it as substrate in my shop as well.
    Bill Arnold
    Membeer of MENSA USA
    Citizen of Texas residing in South Georgia.
    Ignorance is only skin deep, but stupid goes all the way to the marrow!

  8. #8
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    Portsmouth, VA
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    I bought a couple of sheets to make a light hood for a 92 gal corner fish tank. I used 1/2" for the sides and top and bent the 1/4" for the radius (34") on the front. The problems I found with the 1/4" was that the air driven brads pulled through and where I used glue and clamps to hold the end down, the surface veneer separated from the core. It also had some voids that became obvious when light shines through. Had I to do it over, I would have gone with some other 1/4 inch ply or perhaps the door skin material I have seen elsewhere. Surface of the plywood is nice, but it isnt the strongest stuff out there.

  9. #9
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    Charleston
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    I've used it for a complete built in for our FROG, Book cases, TV Cabinet, and a couple of sewing machine tables.

    It works machines easily and the paint finish is fine.

    BUT,

    I don't think I'd stain it.
    If you buy it use it right away. I've had some warpage (is that a word), and don't know if the material is more suseptable to ambiant air moisture than regular plywood. I've had birch ply stored in the same place (garage) and no problem with warpage).

    Obviously, band the edges.

  10. #10
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    Depot Plywood deal

    Since hearing on this thread that The Depot sometimes had $25 birch plywood I have been looking. I was about to buy some Sandeply yesterday when I noticed the sign next to it, "18MM birch plywood $25. Unfortunately the bin only had a few sheets of Sandeply in it. I asked & they checked inventory which said they had 45 sheets. After a long stall, lunch and the department manager arriving for work they finally determined they did not have any left. Having been put to a considerable amount of trouble by now I was not in a mood to walk away empty handed. Another stocking/inventory check revealed that 100 more sheets was due in soon.

    I have a receipt for 10 sheets of 18MM ply at $25 now. I will just keep checking till it shows up. My understanding is it tends to leave pretty fast. So next time you are in your Home Depot you might try to get them to check to see when the next shipment is due in. You may be able to reserve some.

  11. #11
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    I noticed in HD a week or 2 ago that there were 2 different Birch Plywoods in the 4' x 4' bin, one was something like 13 ply and the other was just 5 plus the veneers. The 4'x8' was all 5 ply.

  12. #12
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    The regular Birch plywood they carry in and around Atlanta runs something like $44 a sheet and has more plies compared to what I am gettings. At $25 a sheet I would expect that. I think the Birch ply will still have advantages over the Sandeply though. I know the $25 Birch is never there long.

  13. #13
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    Feb 2003
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    I've used and like sandply for jigs, shop cabinets and a few painted projects. It looks fine for out in the shop or under a coat of paint but I wouldn't use it for a quality project for inside the house.
    Kent Cori

    Half a bubble off plumb

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