Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 22

Thread: Stanley 720 Socket Chisels

  1. #1

    Stanley 720 Socket Chisels

    I'm a new poster, so maybe this isn't the place for this type of question. I have a set of 5 almost new chisels that include one 1 3/4" wide. I haven't been able to find one this size on any internet descriptions. Is that size rare or?? One source by Muster, 2003, doesn't show anything over 1 1/2". Would appreciate any help. Thanks. Ron.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Chevy Chase, Maryland
    Posts
    2,325
    Stanley definitely made 2" (i.e., over 1 1/2). I dunno about 1 3/4" specifically. I find those in big in-between sizes (larger than 1" but less than 2") to be tools I hardly ever find a use for. I either tend to need the standard sizes up to 1" or a honking big one - a 2". I could imagine some in-betweens being useful if you do stuff like post and beam or log cabin building.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    St. Charles, MO
    Posts
    255
    John Walter's guide does not mention a #720 that is 1 3/4 but it does not mention a 1/8 either and one of those was listed on the bay (in a set) the other day. the 1 3/4 is very rare for the 750 series (perhaps the rarest ) so I'm sure this is rare if legit. I just checked John Walter's guide again and it does not list a 1/8 for the 750 and I have one of those so not being in the guide doesn't mean it isn't real. I have a couple 720's that are 2 inches wide so I know they made them wide.
    Pat
    Last edited by Pat Zabrocki; 08-12-2011 at 6:29 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    246
    Rose Antique Tools has old stanley catalogs that are available for free download. A quick look will tell you exactly what sizes were produced.

    PJS

  5. #5
    I don't see where they were made, 1943 or 1958 catalogs. Mine may be more recent, ca. 1960's, don't really know. They do not have 720 number, just Stanley, Made In USA. The 1 3/4" Is 9" long (blade & socket). Ron.

  6. #6
    I recall Joel (TFWW) remarking that the 1 3/4" was the rare size for the #750. It was made but obviously in small quantities. Perhaps the #720 was the same.

    With regard use of sizes , I am with Sean. My preference is up to 1", in fact I prefer the balance of a 3/4" over the 1", and I only occasionally use a 1 1/2". I would not miss the larger sizes if they were not made.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  7. #7

    Here is a poor pic. of the 1 3/4". May not be a 720, I am sure no expert. Ron.


  8. #8
    Ron: go to page 8 (new tools) of the April 1934 Stanley Tools catalog -- Rose Antique Tools site PDF download at -- http://www.roseantiquetools.com/id16.html -- and you will find the No. 720 chisel listing that includes the 1 3/4" width. It also appears in my copy of the 1929 Stanley Tools catalog (the first time the 7xx series chisels were listed). My 1936 catalog does not list the 1 3/4" width for the 720 however, nor do any of my subsequent Stanley catalogs I own, leading me to believe that Stanley dropped that chisel width in the early 1930s.

    James
    Last edited by James Pickering; 08-12-2011 at 11:38 PM. Reason: added missing words

  9. #9
    Thanks, all, for the info. Looks like that size was indeed made in #720. I am quite surprised that my chisel set dates back to the 1930's, they don't look that old. I have had them for about 30 yrs, they must have been pampered the first 40 yrs. Ron.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Ellsworth, Maine
    Posts
    1,444
    That is a very nice set you have there Ron, in superb condition. And I'd have to disagree that my wide chisels are rarely used. I use my wide 2" chisel quite often when trying to make a channel for my saw to follow. I also use it to clean sawn surfaces that none of my planes can get at. There are many instances that come up that require the use of this chisel and am glad it is available to me. Not as used as my smaller chisels but used none the less.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    3,289
    Ignorant question. I don't know that much about Stanley chisels. Are they 720s or 750s or whatever, if they don't have that number stamped on them? Just curious.
    Where did I put that tape measure...

  12. Quote Originally Posted by Gary Herrmann View Post
    Ignorant question. I don't know that much about Stanley chisels. Are they 720s or 750s or whatever, if they don't have that number stamped on them? Just curious.
    My thoughts on this are at: http://jp29.org/wwstanchisels7xx.htm (with illustrations) -- supplemented by this note from my Stanley Nail Hammers page -- http://jp29.org/wwstanhammer.htm

    "It seems that Stanley changed the style and form of the markings from time to time. There are variances similar to those found on Stanley wood chisels. I have encountered hammers of this period with only STANLEY (in cartouche) or STANLEY (in cartouche) with MADE IN USA underneath. These variances can also be found in catalog illustrations although it should be noted that those illustrations do not always depict actual production tools."

    James
    Last edited by James Pickering; 08-13-2011 at 1:54 PM. Reason: added mising words

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    10,469
    Are they 720s or 750s or whatever, if they don't have that number stamped on them?
    This is a question without an answer. Quite often they are listed as being such on ebay without the numbering. Some buyers only want them with the numbers. I had one with numbers that I sold on ebay for not all that much. It was a nice chisel, but I think the collector market has driven up the price.

    I like my Buck Bros and Witherby chisels more than the Stanleys. That is just a personal opinion and has no basis in metallurgical testing.

    BTW, my larger than inch size chisels get used often. A lot of my work is with construction lumber and a 1-1/2" chisel is handy on a 2X.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    2,850
    Ron - Those are truly a pre WWII set of 720's in pristine condition, they would do quite well at a big auction like MJD's Live free or Die or Brown Auction Services. Sets of chisels with their original handles, rust-free blades and near full original length are uncommon, and collectors fight over them.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Ellsworth, Maine
    Posts
    1,444
    The handles look almost un touched in the blurry photo. That is a rare find for sure. I come across an occasional Stanley 720 or 750 at the Tool Barn but most of them are without a handle and if they do have one they are in rough shape. Not sure if you're a collector or not but like has been said these chisels will collect a very nice price on the right auction site. You could purchase top of the line new chisels and have $ left over with what these could go for.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •