Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 31

Thread: Jet 1442 Lathe Replacement Motor?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Colby, Washington. Just across the Puget Sound from Seattle, near Blake Island.
    Posts
    433

    Jet 1442 Lathe Replacement Motor?

    Night before last the damn thing just quit without warning. No rattle, no heat, no bogging down or even a slow start. It isn't that old, and has always performed perfectly. I was turning a bowl, shut it down to take a progress check, and when I switched it back on -- nothing.

    This a Jet 1442VSK (14" diameter, 42" width, 1 1/2 horsepower variable speed) and I checked everything I could in the shop. Yes I have power, no none of the wires came loose between the wall and the motor itself, and both of the starter capacitors seem to check out. The only thing I can think is something inside came loose or broke. I will take it to the local electric motor supplier/repair shop next week, but I'm expecting them to tell me it will cost a ton. While I wait for them to diagnose the problem I'd like to know what a replacement Jet unit will cost to help with the negotiation. Problem is, I can't for the life of me find a 1442 motor anywhere in the internet.

    Anyone have any ideas where I can find one? Any ideas what went wrong with my old one? What would you guys do?


    I should add, I'm going crazy being unable to throw a bowl this weekend! Help!
    Russell Neyman.

    Writer - Woodworker - Historian
    President, Olympic Peninsula Woodturners
    West Puget Sound, Washington State


    "Outside of a dog, there's nothing better than a good book; inside of a dog it's too dark to read."

  2. #2
    It may be the centrifugal starting switch inside the motor. It would be worth the trouble to take it apart and clean the contacts of that switch. Often they get jammed up with dust or the contacts get fouled enough they won't conduct current.
    _______________________________________
    When failure is not an option
    Mediocre is assured.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Eureka, Mo.
    Posts
    2,363
    I went through the same problem you described a few years ago with mine. After doing all the testing Jet customer service asked for they said the motor was bad and had me take the entire headstock to a local machinest who did this sort of repair for them. When I picked it up a few days later it turned out the motor was ok. Turned out dust had gotten into the on/off switch. It has quit twice on me since then with the same symptoms. All I do to fix it anymore is to put the shop vac nozzle over the switch and suck for a few seconds. Turn it on and go again. I sure hope this is all you need to do also.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Colby, Washington. Just across the Puget Sound from Seattle, near Blake Island.
    Posts
    433
    Bill and Dennis, thanks for taking the time to offer advice. Since I posted this (12:15 am last night) I went out and disassembled the starter end of the motor and, yes, there is wear on the centrifugal starting switch (Funny how much these contacts are similar to the old style points on the cars I grew up with!) and they were slightly mis-aligned, as well. I cleaned them, filed off the "burned" area, and reassembled it. Nothing still. I'm thinking the contact points themselves are fried. What does that unit do? Does it cut out the capacitor one the motor has fired up?

    And Bill-- I have power at the motor, so I know this isn't just the primary switch. Hmmm... I wonder if this could have something to do with the ground side. Gotta go back the the shop and tinker some more. Can't let go of this!

    Postscript: I share all these gory details of my battle not only to seek advice and input, but also in hopes that somebody else can avoid a few steps in the problem-solving process down the road.
    Russell Neyman.

    Writer - Woodworker - Historian
    President, Olympic Peninsula Woodturners
    West Puget Sound, Washington State


    "Outside of a dog, there's nothing better than a good book; inside of a dog it's too dark to read."

  5. #5
    I don't really have much to add, except that with OW's a common problem is the kill switch on the lower belt cover fails and the lathe won't go. That is easy to check by simply crossing the switch.

    Based on forum posts, a failed controller is much more common than a failed motor....Keep us apprised.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Mount Sterling, KY
    Posts
    2,241
    If you have not given the motor to the shop yet I would check the motor coils for continuity and for resistance to ground. The following assumes that the power is off and both line leads are disconnected from the motor. Continuity of individual coils should be very low, close to zero on most VOM resistance scales, probably on the order of single digit ohms on the lowest resistance scale. Resistance to ground (the motor's steel case) should not even move the VOM needle on the highest resistance scale. It might deflect for a second or so but should stabilize at very high resistance especially if the capacitors are still in the circuit. If you disconnect the caps there should be no deflection of the needle at all. If either of these readings are the opposite of that stated above the motor is hosed. You will either have to get a new one or get this one rewound. (new is probably cheaper for a motor this size) Here is a link that shows wire/terminal identification so that you can isolate individual coils. http://www.industrial-electronics.co...ification.html

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Luce View Post
    ...Based on forum posts, a failed controller is much more common than a failed motor....Keep us apprised.
    Ditto What Bill said.
    Last edited by James Combs; 09-04-2011 at 2:48 PM.
    ____________________________________________
    JD at J&J WoodSmithing
    Owingsville, Kentucky

    "The best things in life are not things."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    North central Pa Tioga Co.
    Posts
    686
    I had a motor on mine burn out,ordered a new motor from Jet. They where very helpful! Good luck ! G

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Colby, Washington. Just across the Puget Sound from Seattle, near Blake Island.
    Posts
    433
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Luce View Post
    I don't really have much to add, except that with OW's a common problem is the kill switch on the lower belt cover fails and the lathe won't go. That is easy to check by simply crossing the switch.

    Based on forum posts, a failed controller is much more common than a failed motor....Keep us apprised.
    Kill switch? Does the 1442 have one?
    Russell Neyman.

    Writer - Woodworker - Historian
    President, Olympic Peninsula Woodturners
    West Puget Sound, Washington State


    "Outside of a dog, there's nothing better than a good book; inside of a dog it's too dark to read."

  9. #9
    Russell,
    Jet has that motor priced at 385.00 on their site. You have to first know the part number (JWL1642-116) and you can search for that. Here is the link to the actual page: https://parts.maam.waltermeier.com/P...rt=JWL1642-116. I would definately check your ground. Also, is there a reset for the VSD? Sounds like it probably kicked out when you turned off the machine. I just read that in another post the other day. Good luck.
    "Count your age by friends, Count your life by smiles."

  10. #10
    I have a brand new Jet lathe motor that I can't use but need to get to my shop to get specifics for you.
    Sierra Madre Sawing and Milling
    Sierra Madre, California

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Colby, Washington. Just across the Puget Sound from Seattle, near Blake Island.
    Posts
    433
    Ed, mine is a 1442, 1 HP, Variable speed. The 1642 motor mounts differently, so it won't work. But I used your link and located my unit. I'm still very hopeful that this is just a fried starting capacitor or something simple. I wonder-- if I have to swap it, is there a 1 1/2 HP unit that would fit as an upgrade.

    Damion, I will look for a PM from you about the details of the motor you have. It could be the best thing to do is to just buy yours and forget this one.
    Last edited by Russell Neyman; 09-05-2011 at 12:41 AM.
    Russell Neyman.

    Writer - Woodworker - Historian
    President, Olympic Peninsula Woodturners
    West Puget Sound, Washington State


    "Outside of a dog, there's nothing better than a good book; inside of a dog it's too dark to read."

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Colby, Washington. Just across the Puget Sound from Seattle, near Blake Island.
    Posts
    433

    Bump.

    Still looking for suggestions that will get my machine turning again.
    Russell Neyman.

    Writer - Woodworker - Historian
    President, Olympic Peninsula Woodturners
    West Puget Sound, Washington State


    "Outside of a dog, there's nothing better than a good book; inside of a dog it's too dark to read."

  13. #13
    Russell; do you get any hum or twitch at all when you flip the switch? There is usually at least a little drama when a motor goes bad (sparks, smoke or noise). If there is no sound or movement at all, you probably have an open circuit (this could be inside the motor). If it hums any, then it is probably a capacitor or centrifugal starting switch. The switch energizes the capacitor and the start winding until the motor gets up to speed.
    _______________________________________
    When failure is not an option
    Mediocre is assured.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Colby, Washington. Just across the Puget Sound from Seattle, near Blake Island.
    Posts
    433
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Ford View Post
    Russell; do you get any hum or twitch at all when you flip the switch? There is usually at least a little drama when a motor goes bad (sparks, smoke or noise). If there is no sound or movement at all, you probably have an open circuit (this could be inside the motor). If it hums any, then it is probably a capacitor or centrifugal starting switch. The switch energizes the capacitor and the start winding until the motor gets up to speed.
    Nuttin, nada, nothing at all. No hum, no bump, no crackle at any time. It didn't even hesitate before it quit. Just wouldn't start that last time I flipped the switch. I've taken it apart and put it back together twice with no results. It's as quiet as a rock.
    Russell Neyman.

    Writer - Woodworker - Historian
    President, Olympic Peninsula Woodturners
    West Puget Sound, Washington State


    "Outside of a dog, there's nothing better than a good book; inside of a dog it's too dark to read."

  15. #15
    Well you definitely have an open circuit somewhere, you might rig up what I call a pigtail and hook the motor directly to a cord that could be plugged in to an outlet. That would at least verify that the problem is (or is not) actually the motor, I would hate for you to buy a motor only to find out the problem is not the motor. THE PIGTAIL IS FOR TESTING ONLY.
    _______________________________________
    When failure is not an option
    Mediocre is assured.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •