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Thread: My latest segmented turning & photography effort.

  1. #1
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    My latest segmented turning & photography effort.

    I've been trying to get better at my photography and I needed to take pics of my latest piece. A similar one to my last piece but I liked the pattern so much that I thought I'd just mix it up a little. This one is Walnut, Mahogany, Bocote, Maple & Gabon Ebony. It's turned to a touch over 1/8" thick and it's approximately 7-1/2" x 7-1/2". It was turned entirely using the Glaser 10V with an Elsworth grind. For me, that shape is about the most universal you can ask for. Makes life so easy. If you photo guys don't mind, let me know what you think of the photography. I'm learning more every day.

    This was for my Dad for Christmas. 84yrs old and still going strong. God Bless him.
    What you listen to is your business....what you hear is ours.

  2. #2
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    This is an excellent piece of segmenting Bill, but the image is slightly underexposed, which causes a loss of color saturation and contrast. I assume the background is white in color, and a camera setting of +1 in exposure compensation for a reflective background like this should yield a more literal rendering of the subject. I'm curious about the 2 darker circles in the field- could be dirt on the lens elements, as spots on the camera chip would be sharper? Your lights are located at about the same height, and you could improve the balanced highlights by lowering the light on the L side.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Jamie Donaldson; 12-28-2011 at 8:35 PM.

  3. #3
    Bill, looks great from this end. And as you mentioned, I don't think anyone would dislike this shape. I admire segmented work but don't think I could pull it off in my shop, maybe someday.

  4. #4
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    That's a very nice bowl. It's a beautiful shape, wonderful colors and grain. I'm not good at photog either, but I'm guessing the back should be 'whiter?' Great work nonetheless!

  5. #5
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    That is a beautiful piece. I really love the colors you put together I'm sure your dad will love it.
    Comments and Constructive Criticism Welcome

    Haste in every craft or business brings failures. Herodotus,450 B.C.

  6. #6
    Bill, that is some really beautiful work!! Your joinery is superb, the color combinations very pleasing, and the form is very nice. I love the ebony rim and accents (kinda into rims right now!) Your Dad is going to love this piece.

  7. #7
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    Thanks very much for the info and for the compliments. I just looked at the lense, it was quite dusty. It's hard to keep anything clean around here. I'll make some adjustments and try again. Someday I'll get this photography thing figured out.
    What you listen to is your business....what you hear is ours.

  8. #8
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    Bill- make a series of exposures, and vary only the shutter speeds, not the f stops, and this is called "bracketing." Out of those images some will be overexposed with washed out color, and others will be too dark, but somewhere in the middle should be a keeper. I assume that you're not using that terrible "AUTO" setting!

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    No auto setting 8-), probably would be better than my manual stuff though.
    Ok, here's another try. let me know what you think. And thanks again my friends. I still see the 2 smudges and it seems to be lacking in definition. I wonder if it's dust behind the lense. I'll remove it and check.

    This seems a little better than the lower one. (That's it, I'm reading the instructions!)LMAO


    Last edited by Bill Wyko; 12-28-2011 at 9:25 PM.
    What you listen to is your business....what you hear is ours.

  10. #10
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    Dude!! You are a master of segments!!! If I ever hit Az on a trip, you are on my list of "Wanna turn like him" people!!! Just amazing!!!! And God bless your dad!!
    Your Respiratory Therapist wears combat boots

  11. #11
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    Bill - First, the form and segmenting are superb. Photo-wise, are the colors in this last photo of yours closer to real life than Jamies? There was a photo demo thread a few weeks ago that demo's several different lighting approaches on the same object Some photo technique demo's Of these, my favorites are the second (silver umbrella bounced light) and last (softbox strobe) setups. They were the best at taming highlights (which can be quite difficult to prevent), and seemed to give slightly deeper color to the object. With a darker form, you need to let more light in to the camera, so it helps to have a gray fabric drape, or graduated background so that it doesn't appear too bright in relation to the form itself, when the form is properly exposed.

    That said, I don't yet have a graduated background or set of umbrellas (now officially on my list), so I struggle to deal with the highlights too.

    Dan
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    -Woody Allen-

    Critiques on works posted are always welcome

  12. #12
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    Beautiful piece, Bill (as usual ). I think Jamie's comments are a good place to start.
    Your second attemt is a little darker, but the colors still seem washed out. My only advice would be to play around with your camera's settings. Take many photos - electrons are cheap. When you have several different photos, compare them side by side.
    Itís only work if somebody makes you do it.
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  13. #13
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    What ever you did, your copy looks like the real thing.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie Donaldson View Post
    This is an excellent piece of segmenting Bill, but the image is slightly underexposed, which causes a loss of color saturation and contrast. I assume the background is white in color, and a camera setting of +1 in exposure compensation for a reflective background like this should yield a more literal rendering of the subject. I'm curious about the 2 darker circles in the field- could be dirt on the lens elements, as spots on the camera chip would be sharper? Your lights are located at about the same height, and you could improve the balanced highlights by lowering the light on the L side.
    What you listen to is your business....what you hear is ours.

  14. #14
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    Pretty piece, Bill! The bocote is a great choice for segmenting with its uniform striping, and it smells good too!

  15. #15
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    As usual, your segmenting capabilities are impressive, your Dad will cherrish this one for sure.

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