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Thread: storing wooden planes

  1. #1

    storing wooden planes

    simply put, is it ok to store these in a tool cabinet with a dehumidifier, or should they be on shelving with some air circulation ?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    1,328
    Heck if I know, I just leave them scatterd all over my bench! When my wife asks why I don't put my tools away I just tell her I like to look at them.
    The Plane Anarchist

  3. #3
    Most of my wooden body planes have a wax finish from the maker.

    If you're storing them in a wooden cabinet, the humidity should be pretty constant.
    (I haven't a clue what Israeli weather is like - temperate?) The real risk is in seasonal change affecting the fit of the blade and wedge.

    I would suggest you tap out the iron and oil it, after daily use. That will inhibit rust formation.

    jim
    wpt, ma
    (where basements are damp, the way they should be...)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Charlotte, MI
    Posts
    1,194
    Mine live in my tool chests with no ill effects. No dehumidifying technology, other than a few silica packets thrown in my chisel and gouge tills.
    Your endgrain is like your bellybutton. Yes, I know you have it. No, I don't want to see it.

    Ask me why I use hand tools, and I'll tell you

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Belden, Mississippi
    Posts
    2,146
    I keep mine in a wooden chest (that's about 30 planes-big box). I keep the irons loose.
    Bll
    On the other hand, I still have five fingers.

  6. #6
    got it. so fine, they'll go (once I make them) in the tool cabinet I'm making now. my only form of humidity control is a some silica gel like product too, but it seems to work quite well. Israel has ALL (almost) kinds of whether, where I am it's pretty stable. extremely hot (can be 104+) in the summer and not too cold in the winter, I mean, nothing compared to NJ, and no where near freezing. humidity seems to be about 45-65%.
    correct me if I'm wrong but I think it's actually a good environment for woodworking.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    savannah
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    1,100
    It was good enough for Jesus.

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew N. Masail View Post
    got it. so fine, they'll go (once I make them) in the tool cabinet I'm making now. my only form of humidity control is a some silica gel like product too, but it seems to work quite well. Israel has ALL (almost) kinds of whether, where I am it's pretty stable. extremely hot (can be 104+) in the summer and not too cold in the winter, I mean, nothing compared to NJ, and no where near freezing. humidity seems to be about 45-65%.
    correct me if I'm wrong but I think it's actually a good environment for woodworking.
    It's sufficiently stout..


  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by john brenton View Post
    It was good enough for Jesus.
    But the Nazarene cabinetry market was undercut by cheap imports, so he had to teach instead.

    jim
    wpt, ma

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Eureka Springs, AR
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    788
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Matthews View Post
    But the Nazarene cabinetry market was undercut by cheap imports, so he had to teach instead.
    Although, I'm not sure things Jesus are all that relevant to a Jewish nation.

  10. #10
    Actually Jesus was a Jewish Rabbi..... If he was a carpenter, and worked outside here, him and his wood were nicely tanned that's for sure !

  11. #11
    So - what are you building, these days, MNM?

    jim
    wpt, ma

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Eureka Springs, AR
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew N. Masail View Post
    Actually Jesus was a Jewish Rabbi..... If he was a carpenter, and worked outside here, him and his wood were nicely tanned that's for sure !
    Was that a post mortem appointment?

  13. #13
    In thirty years I have had two planes that went out of tune from the environment. One was a Japanese jointer back in the 80s that got really bad. I kept it, but I didn't hold out much hope. It actually was pretty bad, but it is usable after I gained a lot more experience. Another was a pretty extreme plane that was made for a particular job, and is not really typical of anything most people have. Most planes are not adversely affected, and I have had a lot more trouble from planes that rusted than I have had problems with moisture on wood planes. Of course it depends on conditions. I have had shops in basements, and garages, and commercial buildings, the conditions have not been super stable, and I move the planes a to new homes several times a year. I do nothing special to store them. Wooden planes can be designed to exclude moisture change and make them very stable, if you have some really crazy conditions in mind.

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