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Thread: Rough or smooth edges when edge gluing boards?

  1. #1

    Rough or smooth edges when edge gluing boards?

    Hey guys,

    This seems like a minor detail that I forgot which is best. I'll be jointing the edges of some 5'' wide boards together. One edge will be jointed and the other would be a straight line rip from the tablesaw, it might have some saw marks on it.

    Should I also joint this edge before glue up? Or leave the slightly rough edge so the glue better adheres.

    I'm thinking does leaving a somewhat rough edge help the glue bite into the other board as opposed to a smooth edge?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    The closer the two surfaces mate, the stronger the joint and the less noticeable the joint line.

    Smoothness is good as is tight clamp pressure.
    Howie.........

  3. #3
    Things like epoxy benefit from having something to get a grip on. I make PVA glue joints fit as well as possible. If your rip cuts leave marks you can see but, can't really feel; that's usually good enough for me. Irregularity of any degree will prevent a tight seam and therefor make them more visible or even have gaps; obviously not desired.
    “If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.” -- George Orwell


  4. #4
    I see, I see.

    This all makes more sense. I'll just lightly smooth the table saw rip edge with a sanding block before mating the edges. Thank you both for the input. Love this site.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    I no longer use the jointer for edge jointing glue-ups. I find that my Freud glue line rip blade leaves a ready for glue-up edge finish.
    82.7% of all statistics are made up on the spot. -- Steven Wright

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  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Page View Post
    I no longer use the jointer for edge jointing glue-ups. I find that my Freud glue line rip blade leaves a ready for glue-up edge finish.
    Do you mean you just rip each side of the board and it leaves a good finish? That's not a bad idea, espceially for those without a good jointer.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Yes. As long as the boards are flat and true, and I do not have to deal with any bow, I rip & glue. I get a very nice finish using my Unisaw and the Freud glue-line rip blade.
    82.7% of all statistics are made up on the spot. -- Steven Wright

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  8. #8
    Join Date
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    I'm with Brian on the Freud rip blade. It's one of the best tool investments I have ever made.

  9. #9
    If you lay your boards out, match up your grain and such, then fold the two boards back together, just like you're closing a book, and run both through the jointer together at the same time, you should have a perfectly matched glueing surfaces. The surface does not need to necessarily be rough, perfectly matched surfaces would do you better.

    With a panel made up of multiples of more than two boards, just keep doing it to each adjoining pair.
    Sierra Madre Sawing and Milling
    Sierra Madre, California

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Damon Stathatos View Post
    If you lay your boards out, match up your grain and such, then fold the two boards back together, just like you're closing a book, and run both through the jointer together at the same time, you should have a perfectly matched glueing surfaces. The surface does not need to necessarily be rough, perfectly matched surfaces would do you better.

    With a panel made up of multiples of more than two boards, just keep doing it to each adjoining pair.
    That's a great idea. Thank you.




    And I'm probably going to get that glue line rip blade by Freud as well. I wonder if they make them for circular saws too?

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    Also, clamp pressure is necessary of course, but you do not want to clamp the joint too tightly and squeeze out all of the glue. I firmly snug the clamps and leave it to dry.
    82.7% of all statistics are made up on the spot. -- Steven Wright

    Please help support the Creek.


  12. #12
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Damon Stathatos View Post
    If you lay your boards out, match up your grain and such, then fold the two boards back together, just like you're closing a book, and run both through the jointer together at the same time, you should have a perfectly matched glueing surfaces. The surface does not need to necessarily be rough, perfectly matched surfaces would do you better.

    With a panel made up of multiples of more than two boards, just keep doing it to each adjoining pair.
    Yep.. However, I no longer try to run them in pairs. I run them individually in the same "book page" orientation that Damon explained. The reason I changed is that I had a couple foot-faults keeping two boards together, and found it easier to do one at a time. Same principle, though - even if the jointer fence is one-half of one degree off dead-nuts perpendicular, you still get mating edges that leave the surfaces flat. White chalk triangle to orient everything, then run them through the jointer.
    Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more;
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Joeseph View Post
    I see, I see.

    This all makes more sense. I'll just lightly smooth the table saw rip edge with a sanding block before mating the edges. Thank you both for the input. Love this site.
    I was taught to never glue a sanded surface ... only a cut one ... the dust can pack i n the pores and prevent good adhesion ... of course, that info. was over 50 years ago, so take it for what it's worth. I follow it to this day, and have never had a problem. I joint both edges of a glueup.
    FINISHING : NO ART & VERY LITTLE SCIENCE ... just a learned skill that requires a bit of practice and patience ... anyone can learn it.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Wingard View Post
    I was taught to never glue a sanded surface ... only a cut one ... the dust can pack i n the pores and prevent good adhesion ... of course, that info. was over 50 years ago, so take it for what it's worth. I follow it to this day, and have never had a problem. I joint both edges of a glueup.
    Lucky I read that. I'm going to scratch the sanding idea then. Would be better to replace the sandpaper with a light block plane I suppose. Or just have the edge's already jointed from the jointer/saw.

  15. #15
    My first reaction is that you're over thinking this. I've been gluing up directly from the table saw for years. And I don't think it's possible to squeeze out glue so that you won't get a good glue joint. In my early days, I used extreme clamp pressure and never had a glue joint failure. You only need a very small amount of glue to hold two surfaces that are well fitted to each other.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

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