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Thread: A tool tray ... with a difference.

  1. #1

    A tool tray ... with a difference.

    I wanted a tool tray for my bench. Yes, really. However I did not want one that would fill with shavings, or become an obstruction when planing or clamping. It could not be in the middle or at the side of the bench.


    I had this idea when designing the bench that I would build a tray and, instead, attach it to the wall. During the course of my research, I also came across a photo of Chris Schwarz' tool-rack-across-the-window. This gave me an additional idea.


    When I declared the bench completed, this is the box I built for part of the tool tray ...





    Here is the bench now with the completed tool trays - yes, plural ... there are two trays.





    The first tray was attached to the wall so ...





    The second was placed in line with this one, to its right ...





    This tray is essentially a long slot, with the left side having dividers for chisels (these are adjustable for size) ...





    The other half has space for backsaws. While i have a saw till, the slotted tray is simply to hold tools that would otherwise take up space on the bench.





    The top of the tool trays are set a fraction below the top of the bench. When I need to plane across the bench, either the trays will be kept clear, or the bench can be pulled further back from the wall. At this stage there is enough clear room to work across the bench, and also to access the tools in the tray and on the wall.





    Regards from Perth


    Derek

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Burlington, Vermont
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    Looks nice, and handy as well, Derek.

    It took me until the last photo to realize that the chisel/saw one was held away from the wall a bit - I was just thinking sharp edges that close to the brick would not work for me until I realized how far away it's is.

    having been using my workbench top upside-down lately (in theory whilst fitting the tenons for the legs, amongst other things) I've been been enjoying having a series of holes in the back of the bench (my upside down dog holes in this case) to hold chisels and screwdrivers whilst I work. I'm thinking something akin to your setup may be in my future.

  3. #3
    Nice work on this project and very handy too.
    Best Regards,

    Gordon

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Ellsworth, Maine
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    I gotta ask, but what are the wood choices, specifically the light colored wood in the chisel/saw till. I assume it to be maple but the dark streaks kind of throw me off a bit.

    Nice work as always, and def it is something a little different.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    Williamsburg,Va.
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    Great work,Derek. Save some of that curly wood for guitars!

    Is that an outside wall?

  6. #6
    I gotta ask, but what are the wood choices, specifically the light colored wood in the chisel/saw till. I assume it to be maple but the dark streaks kind of throw me off a bit.

    Hi Tony

    The wood is Tasmanian Oak, often also called Tasmanian Ash. It is not a true oak, but a eucalypt (gum). It is one of the cheaper timbers around, and medium hard - about the same density as USA White Oak but has a little more interlocking in the grain. All the wood is Tassie Oak (we we call it), and the piece with the streaking is an example of how much variation there can be. Most is quite pale.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  7. #7
    Great work,Derek. Save some of that curly wood for guitars!

    Is that an outside wall?

    Thanks George. The curly Tassie Oak is unusual (for Tassie Oak). The wood is relatively cheap and when I need something for simple projects I go along to the local Borg (Bunnings) and buy a few lengths off the rack. They do not care about figure, etc. The boards are destined for DIY home repairs. The irony is that a lot of it comes quarter sawn. Very occasionally I find some that is curly, and grab it. It is quite beautiful and would be wasted cut up and nailed together as a kennel. I doubt, however, whether it would have good tonal characteristics for guitars. Does White Oak have?

    The wall is internal. Behind that is a spare bedroom (no one in the family wants to live there with me bashing and crashing in the garage/shop).

    Regards from Perth

    Derek



  8. #8
    I have found a purpose for the "space". This helps more than you can imagine.


    One of the planes that "floats" around the shop is my 36" jointer. I just have no place to park it permanently. It takes up this empty surface, then that empty surface ... getting moved around all the time.


    Now it has a home ...







    Just for reference, that blade (by Berg) is 3" wide.


    Regards from Perth


    Derek

  9. #9
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    Jan 2009
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    Fat chance our borgs would carry nice wood like that!!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Burlington, Vermont
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    Every now and then I'm surprised by what I find in the stack of maple at the local Lowes or HD.

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    I've occassionally found some fiddleback / tiger stripe maple at Home Depot. They don't rigorously sort that stuff, so sometimes it just gets in there. I usually find it in the medium widths - like 4 or 6".

  12. #12
    Nice work, Derek. The bench and tool trays look great.

    By the way, I tried to send you a message, but your PM box is full.

    Joe

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    I also get a lot of my tiger stripe maple at the local borg. I am constantly surprised by how much of the wood they have there is figured. Unfortunately very few of the boards are flat and need to be flattened and planed down. But most of the my work is pretty small scale anyways.

    I've also found a charge of figured red oak there a month or so ago. Im not a big fan of red oak, in fact I have never used red oak in a project, but this figured stuff really is something different that I've never seen. My wood hoarding character flaw took over and ended up taking all that was there. Now to figure out what to use it on.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Saratoga Springs, Utah
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    Derek,

    Nice work! Do you move your bench alot? It seems as though you have locked your bench into that spot and therefore only work on three sides. (And you do amazing work just on those three sides. I just wonder, as I have mine out in the middle of things and while I am not happy with the messy state of my shop, I like having access on all sides of the bench.

    Thoughts?
    Sawdust is some of the best learning material!

  15. #15
    nice work. dumb question - how are they attached to the wall? Sorry if i just missed it.
    that you also aspire to lead a quiet life, to mind your own business, and to work with your own hands, as we commanded you...
    1 Thessalonians 4:11

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