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Thread: Contact Cement: Latex vs Solvent Based

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    108

    Contact Cement: Latex vs Solvent Based

    I need to attach some 1/8" oak skins to the sides of kitchen cabinets. I've been told that solvent-based contact cement will hold up better than latex-based contact cement. I would like to use the latex stuff because the solvent-based contact cement sounds dangerous. I do have a cartrige-style respirator with VOC-rated filters if the votes are all in favour of the solvent-based.

    Some of the cabinets have unfaced particleboard. I will 'prime' these surfaces (and the skins) with a thinned down coat of contact cement, and let them dry overnight before applying the final coat.

    Some of the cabinets have melamine-faced particleboard. I will sand these surfaces with 80grit sandpaper on the orbital sander to 'rough up' the surface before applying CC.

    Steve

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Waterford, MI
    Posts
    4,673
    I've only used two kinds of the latex type and don't remember the brand name of either. I'll try calling the place where I bought the good one. If I can figure out what brand it was I'll update you. Anyway, the brand I bought at HomeDepot was lousy. The one I bought at a local cabinetmaker's supply was very good stuff and I wouldn't hesitate to use it again.
    Use the fence Luke

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    108
    What I've bought is Lepage 'green' contact cement in the yellow and green label.

    steve

  4. #4
    Steve,
    I have always preferred the solvent based, but the latex gets good reports by some serious woodworkers. BUT, I do not like your idea of priming over night. I believe the can spells out recoating sooner than that. In the case of solvent, the recoat was as soon as the first coat became a little beyond tacky...about an hour. I fear that if you go too long, it won't bond as well.
    My brand preference is Formica.
    John Lucas
    woodshopdemos

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Tacoma, WA
    Posts
    519
    I have had very good results with 3M fast bond 30 water based contact cement. It does take a while to dry (30 minutes accounting for the 30 in the name) but using a heat gun speeds the process considerably. Some stuff I have is about 4 years old and still holding strong (that's the oldest I've got).

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Cox
    I have had very good results with 3M fast bond 30 water based contact cement. It does take a while to dry (30 minutes accounting for the 30 in the name) but using a heat gun speeds the process considerably. Some stuff I have is about 4 years old and still holding strong (that's the oldest I've got).
    Yes. 3M fastbond is what I switched to about a year ago after having problems with Titebonds blue stuff. At $60.00 a gallon, it is good stuff. I double coat the substrate.


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