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Thread: Veritas Pipe Vise - Think two could make you a twin screw?

  1. #1
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    Veritas Pipe Vise - Think two could make you a twin screw?

    As usual, my mid week boredom kicked in, so I decided to check out the "whats new" section of the LV site. Noticed this groovy little "pipe vise" . I've seen people makes vises out of pipe clamps, but I'd never heard an inkling that LV (or anyone) was going to market one specifically for this purpose. What say you? Over priced pipe-clamp OR really cool adaptation of an old idea?

    I like the looks of it and am wondering how easy it would be to set therelease lever/pedal (read instructions on site for clarification) to make a QR twin screw/moxon? Thoughts?

  2. #2
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    It is an interesting adaptation of existing equipment.

    If you want to see how it works and you have a pair of pipe clamps it wouldn't be hard to make a prototype to test out the design.

    Magnets mortised into a wooden mount and jaw could hold things in place for a trial period.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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    Yeah probably wouldn't be too hard to prototype. I got intrigued because I need to replace my tail vise (an only somewhat functional QR cast iron vise by Groz that worked quite well until I stupidly broke it). I've thought about doing something with pipe clamps before based on the Blum benches, but his way of using them is specific to his style of torsion box bench. This seemed like a good option for replacing my tail vise and then I got to thinking about other uses, which led me to my post about a twin screw. I feel like i've seen plans or a writeup somewhere for twin screw pipe clamp vises, but cant remember where. Anyway, was just kinda intrigued. I could always buy one and try it out as a tail vise and if I really like it then start considering how to use a couple more to make a twin screw. The more I think about it the more I think it would be quite easy to make a moxon vise out of these or even plain old pipe clamps, actually given that I have a Nicholson style bench, I could probably mount the bases on the back of my big apron and have a very quick to remove TS vise that mounts right into the front of my bench.
    Last edited by Chris Griggs; 05-16-2012 at 3:53 PM.

  4. #4
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    I believe that Fine Woodworking had a bench design based on pipe clamp vises that could be oriented several ways. The other thought for a demountable TS vice in an apron is to use the LV press screws. I used them in a Moxon and there's no reason why they couldn't be used for a demountable TS. The "nut" part of the assembly jam fits (from the back) into the apron of the bench -- when the TS chop is removed there are only the two holes in the apron visible. The press screws are $38 for a pair -- http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/pag...=1,43838,43845 .
    Last edited by Joel Goodman; 05-16-2012 at 5:35 PM.

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    SDC12554.jpgA "leg up"????

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joel Goodman View Post
    I believe that Fine Woodworking had a bench design based on pipe clamp vises that could be oriented several ways. The other thought for a demountable TS vice in an apron is to use the LV press screws. I used them in a Moxon and there's no reason why they couldn't be used for a demountable TS. The "nut" part of the assembly jam fits (from the back) into the apron of the bench -- when the TS chop is removed there are only the two holes in the apron visible. The press screws are $38 for a pair -- http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/pag...=1,43838,43845 .
    Yeah for a twin screw it might just better to KISS and use press screws, especially considering that the main use would be dovetailing - there's really no need for a QR function when your only clamping 1/2-3/4 boards 99% of the time. I just remembered I have one lying around somewhere already too, so I could actually just buy one press screw and be good to go there.

    I saw the pipe vise and the hamster in my brain started running in his wheel - still might try one for a tail vise but the press screws are tried and true for a small twin screw vises.

  7. #7
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    [QUOTE=Chris Griggs;1928346]Yeah for a twin screw it might just better to KISS and use press screws,

    Oh sure get my Hamster running then have a moment of practicality and change derections. ;~)

    It is a pretty neat tool with possibilitys. A BOB comes to mind.
    Good, Better, Best never let it rest
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  8. #8
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    Years ago I made a twin pipe clamp vise, and rigged a quick release activated by a foot pedal. It worked OK to clamp big things, but I had it in an end vise position and it didn't work as well to hold dogs while open. I think the Lee Valley version might anchor the jaw better than mine did. I replaced it with a standard quick release vise about when Schwarz published his Holtzapffel bench set up that way.

    The wing nut instead of a crank on the Lee Valley vise may be less painful to walk into, but would be slower. It might be good enough because you only need the quick release to open a pipe clamp mechanism -- it will push closed even without pressing the quick release, so you never need to crank very far. But because the quick release is less convenient it will only be used for large openings, so the quick cranking of a handle would likely be preferred over the wingnut.
    Last edited by Alan Schwabacher; 05-16-2012 at 9:06 PM.

  9. #9
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    I wonder why they used a wingnut instead of a small sliding-in-bar-hole type handle. The instruction specifically discuss "timing" the wingnut so thatwen you tighten it the wings sit horizontally and don't stick out above the block. Seems kinda inconvenient, although if you can put a high enough vice chop on it and still get good clamping pressure with dogs it wouldn't matter. I do however, wonder if Alans experience with trying to use a pipe clamp vise to clamp between dogs would also apply here.

    I do like regular old QR vises for end vises so I may just replace mine with another. I've also consider the inset vise but that would effectively shorten my bench which at 5 1/2 feet I really don't want to shorten. That's the appeal of QR end vises and the pipe vise to me - because they extend beyond the end of the bench they effectively lengthen it. I actually prefer wagon style vises to some extent because the entire work piece is supported by the bench, but again, I'd don't want to loose any length on my bench.

  10. #10
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    If you use the Veritas pipe vise for a twin screw vise the cost is $118( plus the cost of the pipe ) for a less than ideal system. You can buy a Veritas twin screw vise for $239. That's a difference of $121. In the end, the pipe vise isn't that great of a savings, so I'd go with the Veritas twin screw vise, which is a much better system.

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