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Thread: Sorby Excelsior tools

  1. #1
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    Sorby Excelsior tools

    Has anyone used one of the new excelsior line of Sorby tools? I guess I'm kind of skeptical if these are better, they are titanium coated for longer edge durability.

    But whenever I buy new turning tools, I immediately sharpen them, as the factory edge is usually substandard. If you sharpen/grind them, doesn't the titanium coating get ground off, defeating its purpose?

  2. #2
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    That was my initial reaction too. On the other hand a cutting edge has TWO surfaces that meet and the quality of the edge is related to both. IMHO, if the flute is not well polished the edge will not be as good. I think the anodizing done on other tools (DT for example) would be about as effective though.
    Retired - when every day is Saturday (unless it's Sunday).

  3. #3
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    The gold colored titanium nitride coating on most cutting tool applications is actually fool's gold to lure suckers into buying said items! It is removed at the cutting edge with a first sharpening, so there is little reason for it in the first place, other than sales enhancement.

  4. #4
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    Jamie
    I have to differ with you. I have a small machine shop in my wood shop and use allot of Ti N coated end mills and they out last my HSS cutters by at lest 3 times. The cutting edge is the same as turning tools edges, two flats coming together to for a sharp angle. I use mostly all DT tools and would like to here from someone that trys these new tools. But I do believe it will make a difference. IMHO
    Comments and Constructive Criticism Welcome

    Haste in every craft or business brings failures. Herodotus,450 B.C.

  5. #5
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    But Harry, you're not sharpening those cutters are you? Once the TiN coating is ground away, the metal under it is no longer benefiting from the coating. TiN works well for sliding and cutting surfaces when the metal surface is not damaged by sharpening/grinding.

  6. #6
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    I could be all wrong but as an old machinist I say that once you put these tools to the grinding wheel you loose most of any plus the TiN coating had to offer.

    Sid
    A man who works with his hands is a laborer, a man who works with his hands and his mind is a craftsman, but a man who works with his hands, his mind and his heart is an artist.

    Louis Nizer

  7. #7
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    Your only loosing the coating on the bevel or bottom of the gouge the flute well still be coated and the wood rides on the bevel but is cut by the edge which is the inside of the flute at the edge of the bevel. Think about it,Coating will still be on the side that is cutting not the side that is rubbing.
    Drill bits coated with Ti N will cut better and last longer then untreated. And we all know that you can turn wood with the Drill Bit Tool from the WoodeNickel. I know that this sounds like another gimik from Sorby but thinking about it I believe it will Help the cutting edge,may not be a DT or Glaser but I do believe it's going to help. A may have to buy one to try it but don't know when.
    Comments and Constructive Criticism Welcome

    Haste in every craft or business brings failures. Herodotus,450 B.C.

  8. #8
    As a very curious person, I don't think I will try them out, unless others start to clamor about how great they are. I have used titanium coated drill bits and didn't find them any better than standard ones. My local diamond/CBN matrix style wheel makers have some electroplated type of surface coat that they want to try on my cutting tools. It does help the saw mill blades. I would think that if you sharpened on a wheel, you raise a burr, and if you hone off that burr, any advantage is gone.

    Doug's tools are anodized??? I know that is used on aluminum for oxidation protection, but is it done to the steels as well?

    robo hippy

  9. #9
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    Doug's tools aren't anodized, there is a coating that is built up due to the heat treating/ cryogenic tempering process (from my understanding.)
    I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination. Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world. ~ Albert Einstein

  10. #10
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    Interesting thread. I'd have to agree with Harry though. That does make sense, that the actual cutting edge in teh TiN surface.

    I'll throw this into the mix. I never heard of the TiN tools, and have never seen them on e-bay, which I regularly visit to find tools and low ball bid them. That means to me that a) no one actually buys them or b) whomever does buy them are happy they did and won't sell it. Oh I guess I'll have to add the most probable, c) they buy them, they suck, but most turners are tool collectors, and they don't resell them. Hope that someday they'll find an actual use of them. After all, I STILL have my Sorby spindlemaster. One of the more disapointing tool purchases I've made. I does make a good weeder though.

  11. #11
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    face slap! My mistake. The handles (aluminum) are anodized not the gouges themselves. Doug talked about the anodyzing being harder than the bare aluminum when he laser engraved a handle.
    Retired - when every day is Saturday (unless it's Sunday).

  12. #12
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    All Right
    I'm going to see if I can get one Monday,probably have to order it from England so might be a while till I can let you know anything.But will keep you all posted. I think I'll order a 1/2" bowl gouge that should let us know if the Ti N does any good.
    Comments and Constructive Criticism Welcome

    Haste in every craft or business brings failures. Herodotus,450 B.C.

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