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Thread: Beech Bowl with Zentangle (R) Pyrography

  1. #1
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    Beech Bowl with Zentangle (R) Pyrography

    Beech Bowl with pyrography. Finished with Bush Oil and Polyurethane. Around 8" (20cm) across. My first attempt at embellishing with Zentangle (R) patterns.


    Beech ZIA Bowl 01 by Eric Holmquist, on Flickr
    Eric Holmquist
    C&C Always Welcome

  2. #2
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    very nice, beech needs a little something, can you expand on the Zentangle (R) patterns, who, and when did they live. totaly ignorant about these patterns, but they attractive. what does the (R) stand for? its not copyrighted is it????

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by charlie knighton View Post
    very nice, beech needs a little something, can you expand on the Zentangle (R) patterns, who, and when did they live. totaly ignorant about these patterns, but they attractive. what does the (R) stand for? its not copyrighted is it????
    Zentangle (R) is a registered trademark for a meditative drawing technique that can produce some amazing patterns. One is free to use the patterns on other art forms (Zentangle Inspired Art). There are numerous books on the subject.
    Eric Holmquist
    C&C Always Welcome

  4. #4
    I have no clue as to Zentangle..but the design is appealing, and gives the bowl a step up in interest.
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  5. #5
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    I agree that the design is really appealling and really nice bowl.
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  6. I really llike it, makes an ordinary bowl into an elegant art forum.

  7. #7
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    That is very nice Eric, first class pyro work.

  8. #8
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    Very nice Eric, this art form definitly dresses up an otherwise unassuming piece of wood. While the form, finish and the bark inclusions might have carried this piece on their own, your embellishment elevates it to an objet d'art. I looked at the website for Zentangle (R) and I am intrigued by the possibilities. While I am not currently set up for pyrography, it is certainly something on my "gotta try that" list.
    Call me Jim, James seems so stuffy.
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  9. #9
    Nice bowl, and Zentangling can be quite compelling. I showed a couple of Lauren's tangles in a recent post, and will be demonstrating it as part of our demos at the AAW symposium. http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthre...pendant-photos
    Last edited by Alan Zenreich; 01-26-2013 at 8:49 PM.
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  10. #10
    One thing you might want to consider is putting more detail into the tangles. Your spaces between your lines would be a great canvas for smaller patterns and solid areas.
    Lathes: Nova DVR XP, Delta 46-460, Jet 1014vsi; Bader III 2"x72" belt grinder; Triton 2.25 router; CMT Industrio table; Jointech fence; SC planer; Dewalt miter; Delta 14" bandsaw; Festool TS55, MFT/3, CT22, ETS150/3, OF1400, PSB300EQ, CXS; Hegner Scrollsaw; JJ-6CS jointer; Grizzly 1023s cabinetsaw, Jet 17" drill press; Rigid OSS; 9" SandFlee; 3M AirStream & Breathe Easy PAPRs

  11. #11
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    Thanks everyone!

    Zentangle (R) patterns on turnings or flat work have pretty decent potential. I tried using fine line markers (Copic Multiliner) on wood and they bleed too much (Tried on hard maple pieces) so I went with pyro using a medium spear tip. This limits me to patterns that do not have a lot of tight radius curves, but there are enough patterns with mild curves to have a lot of fun. If I used a small ball tip, I could get the same effects as paper and ink, but I struggle to get smooth lines / curves with pyro unless I have a spear or skew tip.

    What Google searches I've done seem to indicate that the few people who play with Zentangle (R) patterns on wood, do so with pyro, probably for the same reasons I went that way. I have not given up on pens, I'll give Sakura Micron and Statdler a try and see if I can find some technique that lets me get crisp lines.
    Eric Holmquist
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Zenreich View Post
    One thing you might want to consider is putting more detail into the tangles. Your spaces between your lines would be a great canvas for smaller patterns and solid areas.
    I agree, but for now I am keeping it fairly simple while I get comfortable with using pyro instead of a pen, but hope to branch out and start laying down a "thread" and tangling around the thread for a more organic look. I'll probably do a couple more pieces with variations on this pattern before moving on.
    Eric Holmquist
    C&C Always Welcome

  13. #13
    Eric,

    Lauren is doing fine with the Pigma Micron pens and 'brush' pens on maple.
    We tried sealing the wood first with shellac, but she actually preferred the way the pens flow on raw wood.
    Lathes: Nova DVR XP, Delta 46-460, Jet 1014vsi; Bader III 2"x72" belt grinder; Triton 2.25 router; CMT Industrio table; Jointech fence; SC planer; Dewalt miter; Delta 14" bandsaw; Festool TS55, MFT/3, CT22, ETS150/3, OF1400, PSB300EQ, CXS; Hegner Scrollsaw; JJ-6CS jointer; Grizzly 1023s cabinetsaw, Jet 17" drill press; Rigid OSS; 9" SandFlee; 3M AirStream & Breathe Easy PAPRs

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Zenreich View Post
    Eric,

    Lauren is doing fine with the Pigma Micron pens and 'brush' pens on maple.
    We tried sealing the wood first with shellac, but she actually preferred the way the pens flow on raw wood.
    Thanks for the info, I tried a Pigma Micron 01 and liked the results, no bleeding of the lines. Now I have to play with finishes over the ink to see how that goes.
    Eric Holmquist
    C&C Always Welcome

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